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עמוד בית
Tue, 25.06.24

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January 2022
Ron Skorochod B MED Sc, Daniel Fink MD, Victoria Doviner MD, and Gideon Nesher MD
May 2016
Dan Meir Livovsky MD, Orit Pappo MD, Galina Skarzhinsky PhD, Asaf Peretz MD AGAF, Elliot Turvall MSc and Zvi Ackerman MD

Background: Recently we observed patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) or chronic reflux symptoms (CRS) who developed gastric polyps (GPs) while undergoing surveillance gastroscopies for the detection of either esophageal varices or Barrett's esophagus, respectively.

Objectives: To identify risk factors for GP growth and estimate the gastric polyp growth rate (GPGR).

Methods: GPGR was defined as the number of days since the first gastroscopy (without polyps) in the surveillance program, until the gastroscopy when a GP was discovered.

Results: Gastric polyp growth rates in CLD and CRS patients were similar. However, hyperplastic gastric polyps (HGPs) were detected more often (87.5% vs. 60.5%, P = 0.051) and at a higher number (2.57 ± 1.33 vs. 1.65 ± 0.93, P = 0.021) in the CLD patients. Subgroup analysis revealed the following findings only in CLD patients with HGPs: (i) a positive correlation between the GPGR and the patient's age; the older the patient, the longer the GPGR (r = 0.7, P = 0.004). (ii) A negative correlation between the patient's age and the Ki-67 proliferation index value; the older the patient, the lower the Ki-67 value (r = -0.64, P = 0.02). No correlation was detected between Ki-67 values of HGPs in CLD patients and the presence of portal hypertension, infection with Helicobacter pylori, or proton pump inhibitor use.

Conclusions: In comparison with CRS patients, CLD patients developed HGPs more often and at a greater number. Young CLD patients may have a tendency to develop HGPs at a faster rate than elderly CLD patients.

April 2011
R. Inbar, E. Santo, A. El-Abid Subchi, J. Korianski, Z. Halperin, R. Greenberg and S. Avital

 

Background: Esophageal perforations and postoperative esophageal leaks are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality and pose a difficult therapeutic challenge. 

Objectives: To evaluate the outcome of removable self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) as a treatment for postoperative leaks and perforations of the esophagus and stomach.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of all patients in one medical center who underwent temporary insertion of a covered plastic stent for postoperative leaks and perforations of the esophagus and stomach from June 2009 to February 2010. Data were retrieved from hospital and outpatient clinical data charts. Data included indication for insertion, post-insertion outcome including stent complications, and follow-up after stent removal.

Results: The indications for stent insertion were postoperative leak in four patients and postoperative esophagopleural fistula in one patient. Three of the patients had a leak at the gastro-esophageal junction following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. In all cases the stent insertion was completed successfully. In three patients the stent migrated distally. In two of these three it was repositioned or replaced endoscopically, and in the third it was excreted in the feces. Stents were removed electively after 6 to 7 weeks. All patients recovered fully and were discharged from the hospital.

Conclusions: SEMS insertion may have an important role in the management of postoperative leaks and perforations of the esophagus and stomach and should be considered in such cases.
 

February 2002
Eilon Shany, MD, David Greenberg, MD and Eliezer Shahak, MD
March 2001
Eliad Karin, MD, Riad Haddad, MD and Hanoch Kashtan, MD
July 2000
Boaz Sagie, MD, Hanoch Kashtan, MD and Yoram Kluger, MD
December 1999
Hagith Nagar, MD
 Background: Gastrointestinal duplications are rare, benign congenital lesions that may occur at any location along the alimentary tract and generally require surgical intervention. Presenting symptoms may be quite varied even among patients with the same anomaly.

Objective: To review the clinical presentation of gastrointestinal duplications and present our experience with such lesions over the past decade.

Methods: The records of all patients treated for gastrointestinal duplications at a tertiary hospital during 1987 through 1996 were collected, and relevant published literature reviewed.

Results: In the nine patients with gastrointestinal duplications, six were in the small bowel and one each in the cecum, colon and esophagus. Presenting clinical features were varied and often subtle. Perinatal ultrasonography, radioscintography and computerized tomography were useful in some cases, while in others the correct diagnosis was established only at surgery.

Conclusions: Alimentary tract duplications are uncommon, and may present as solid or cystic tumors, intussusception, perforation or gastrointestinal bleeding. A high index of suspicion is required when dealing with such cases. Appropriate investigations, including imaging techniques, should be directed toward adequate and planned surgery.

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