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עמוד בית
Fri, 01.03.24

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April 2023
Avshalom Oziri MD, Michael Schnapper MD, Adi Ovadia MD, Shirli Abiri MD, Gila Meirson MD, Ilona Brantz RN, Osnat Blass Oziri, Diana Tasher MD, Avigdor Mandelberg MD, Ilan Dalal MD

Background: The global refugee crises have raised concerns among medical communities worldwide; nonetheless, access to healthcare has rarely been studied even though refugees are a medically high-risk group.

Objectives: To compare pediatric department admission rates from the pediatric emergency department (PED) of refugees and Israelis.

Methods: We compared data from refugee and Israeli children admitted to the pediatric department at Wolfson Medical Center in Israel between 2013–2017.

Results: A total of 104,244 patients (aged 0–18 years) came to the PED. Admission rate to the pediatric department for refugees was 695/2541 (27%) compared to 11,858/101,703 (11.7%) Israeli patients (P < 0.001). Hospital stay for patients 0–2-years of age was 3.22 ± 4.80 days for refugees vs. 2.78 ± 3.17 for Israelis (P < 0.03). Re-admission rate within 7 days was 1.3% for refugees and 2.6% for Israelis (P < 0.05). Dermatological diseases (e.g., impetigo and cellulitis) were more frequent in refugees (23.30% vs. 13.15%, P < 0.01); however, acute gastroenteritis and respiratory diagnoses were more common in Israelis (18.52% vs. 11.72%, P < 0.05 and 14.84% vs. 6.26%, P < 0.01, respectively). Neurological diseases (e.g., febrile convulsions) were also more frequent in Israelis (7.7% vs. 3%, P < 0.05). Very significantly, 23% of refugees had no healthcare coverage, while only 0.2% of the Israelis had none (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: We found significant morbidity in refugees compared to the local Israeli pediatric population, highlighting the need for different approaches for each population.

January 2015
Adi Ovadia MD, Aharon Kessel MD, Esther Leshinsky-Silver PhD and Ilan Dalal MD
November 2010
December 2008
V. Gazit, D. Tasher, A. Hanukoglu, Z. Landau, Y. Ben-Yehuda, E. Somekh, I. Dalal

Background: Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is dominated by a Th1 response whereas atopic diseases such as asthma, eczema and allergic rhinitis are characterized by a Th2 response. Because it is known that Th1 and Th2 cells reciprocally counteract each other, it can be speculated that the prevalence of Th2-mediated diseases is lower in patients with a Th1-mediated disease.

Objectives: To compare the prevalence of atopic diseases among children with IDDM[1] and age-matched controls.

Methods: The study group comprised 65 children with IDDM attending the pediatric endocrinology clinic at the Wolfson Medical Center. The control group consisted of 74 non-diabetic children who presented at the emergency room due to an acute illness (burns, abdominal pain, fever, head trauma). Patients were asked to complete a detailed questionnaire on their history of personal and familial atopic and autoimmune diseases. In addition, a total serum immunoglobulin E concentration and the presence of IgE[2] antibodies to a panel of relevant inhalant allergens were analyzed.

Results: Children with IDDM and their first-degree relatives had a significantly higher prevalence of other autoimmune diseases such as thyroiditis and celiac as compared to controls. The two groups had a similar prevalence of atopic diseases with respect to history, total serum IgE, or the presence of IgE antibodies to a panel of relevant inhalant allergens.

Conclusions: The prevalence of atopic diseases in IDDM patients was similar to that in the normal population. Our results suggest that the traditional Th1/Th2 theory to explain the complexity of the immune response is oversimplified. 

 

 






[1] IDDM = insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

[2] Ig = immunoglobulin


June 2006
A. Ballin, A. Osdachi, A. Klivitsky, I. Dalal and M. Lishner
Background: Community-acquired bronchopneumonia in children is frequently accompanied by extreme leukocytosis, whereas in adults with the same diagnosis a high leukocyte count is uncommon. Data regarding differences in the serum levels of inflammatory cytokines between children and adults are limited.

Objectives: To compare leukocyte counts and blood levels of various inflammatory cytokines in children and adults diagnosed with community-acquired bronchopneumonia.

Methods: We prospectively evaluated all pediatric and adult patients admitted for bronchopneumonia based on clinical and chest X-ray findings.. Blood was drawn for complete blood count and serum concentration of the following cytokines: granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, interleukins-6, 8 and 10, interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor, as well as matrix metalloproteinase-9 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

Results: There were 31 children and 32 adults. The patients in both groups had similar parameters of infection severity. None of them required admission to the Intensive Care Unit. Mean (± SD) leukocyte counts in the pediatric and adult groups were 21,018/mm (± 10,420) and 12,628/mm (± 6735) respectively (P = 0.02). Age was inversely correlated with leukocytes in the pediatric group (P = 0.0001). A significant inverse correslation was also found between age and platelet counts. Although cuytokine levels in both groups were not significantly different, age was

Conclusions: The immune response in community-aquired bronchopneumonia is, at least partly, age-dependent.

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