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Sat, 13.04.24

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March 2020
Misgav Rottenstreich MD MBA, Ortal Reznick MD, Hen Y. Sela MD, Alexander Ioscovich MD, Sorina Grisaro Granovsky MD PhD, Carolyn F. Weiniger MD and Sharon Einav MD MSc

Background: Admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) is an objective marker of severe maternal morbidity (SMM).

Objectives: To determine the prevalence of obstetric ICU admissions in one medical center in Israel and to characterize this population.

Methods: In this retrospective study the files of women coded for pregnancy, birth, or the perinatal period and admission to the ICU were pulled for data extraction (2005–2013).

Results: During the study period, 111 women were admitted to the ICU among 120,279 women who delivered babies (0.09%). Their average age was 30 ± 6 years, most were multigravida, a few had undergone fertility treatments, and only 27% had complicated previous pregnancies. Most pregnancies (71.2%) were uneventful prior to admission. ICU admissions were divided equally between direct (usually hemorrhage) and indirect (usually cardiac disease) obstetric causes.

Conclusions: The indications for obstetrics ICU admission correlated with the proximate causes of maternal arrest observed worldwide. While obstetric hemorrhage is often unpredictable, deterioration of heart disease is foreseeable. Attention should be directed specifically toward improving the diagnosis and treatment of maternal heart disease during pregnancy in Israel.

June 2017
Ella Even-Tov, Itzhak Koifman, Vladimir Rozentsvaig, Leonid Livshits and Peter Gilbey

Background: Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) has become a standard technique for critically ill patients who require long-term ventilation. The most common early post-operative complication is bleeding related to anatomical variation in vasculature. The procedure is performed at the patient's bedside unless this is deemed unsafe and then the accepted alternative is open tracheostomy in the operating room. 

Objectives: To evaluate the use of pre-procedural ultrasound to aid in the decision of whether PDT in critical care patients should be performed at the patient's bedside or by open surgical tracheostomy.

Methods: Patients were jointly evaluated by a critical care physician and a head and neck surgeon. Based on this evaluation, the method of tracheostomy was determined. Subsequently, pre-procedural ultrasound examination of the anterior neck was performed. The final decision whether to perform PDT or open surgical tracheostomy was based on the ultrasound findings. Changes in management decisions following ultrasound were recorded. 

Results: We included 36 patients in this prospective study. Following ultrasound examination, the management decision was changed in nine patients (25%).

Conclusions: Pre-procedural ultrasound for critically ill patients undergoing tracheostomy can influence management decisions regarding the performance of tracheostomy. 

 

November 2013
D. J. Jakobson and I. Shemesh
 Background: Goal-oriented ultrasound examination is gaining a place in the intensive care unit. Some protocols have been proposed but the applicability of ultrasound as part of a routine has not been studied.

Objectives: To assess the influence of ultrasound performed by intensive care physicians.

Methods: This retrospective descriptive clinical study was performed in a medical-surgical intensive care unit of a university-affiliated general hospital. Data were collected from patients undergoing ultrasound examinations performed by a critical care physician from January 2010 to June 2011.

Results: A total of 299 ultrasound exams were performed in 113 mechanically ventilated patients (70 males, mean age 65 years). Exams included trans-cranial Doppler (n=24), neck evaluation before tracheostomy (n=15), chest exam (n=83), focused cardiac echocardiography (n=60), abdominal exam (n=41), and comprehensive screening at patient admission (n=30). Ultrasound was used to guide invasive procedures for vascular catheter insertion (n=42), pleural fluid drainage (n=24), and peritoneal fluid drainage (n=7). One pneumothorax was seen during central venous line insertion but no complications were observed after pleural or abdominal drainage. The ultrasound study provided good quality visualization in 86% (258 of 299 exams) and was a diagnostic tool that induced a change in treatment in 58% (132 of 226 exams).

Conclusions: Bedside ultrasound examinations performed by critical care physicians provide an important adjunct to diagnostic and therapeutic performance, improving quality of care and patient safety. 

September 2011
D.A. Galvan, K. Matsushima and H.L. Frankel

Ultrasonography in the intensive care unit (ICU) has become a valuable tool for expeditiously, safely and effectively diagnosing and treating a myriad of conditions commonly encountered in this setting. Most surgeons are familiar with FAST (focused assessment with sonography in trauma) and can readily grasp the fundamentals of a limited or directed ultrasonographic exam. Thus, with appropriate training and practice, surgeons can utilize this tool in visualizing, characterizing and treating life-threatening conditions in their role as intensivists in the surgical ICU (SICU). In this review we will discuss the role of ultrasonography in evaluating the acute cardiac status of a patient in the SICU as well as its use in general critical care for assessing the thoracic, abdominal and vascular systems.
 

September 1999
Avishai Ziser, MD, Ludmila Guralnik, MD, Robert Markovits, MD, Yousif Matanis, MD, and Genia Mahamid, MD.
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