• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Mon, 26.02.24

Search results


March 2022
Ortal Tuvali MD, Gal Sella MD, Dan Haberman MD, Valeri Cuciuc MD, and Jacob George MD

The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is multifactorial, mainly driven by complex inflammatory processes. Colchicine is an anti-inflammatory drug used in a variety of clinical settings. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the role of colchicine in atherosclerotic vascular disease and more specifically, its promising impact on the outcome of patients with stable and acute coronary syndrome and to review its effect in patients undergoing angioplasty. A literature review was performed using the search terms colchicine, coronary heart disease, or acute coronary syndrome, stable coronary disease. We accessed PubMed, Google scholar, and the Cochrane Library databases to search for studies. Patients with chronic coronary disease may benefit from treatment with low dose colchicine to reduce the occurrence of a cardiovascular event. Among patients with a recent myocardial infarction, colchicine treatment was associated with reduced ischemic cardiovascular events, although without a meaningful difference in mortality. Colchicine was found to be a promising agent that can be potentially integrated into the armamentarium of treatments for patients with atherosclerotic coronary disease pending careful patient selection

October 2010
R.O. Escarcega, J. Carlos Perez-Alva, M. Jimenez-Hernandez, C. Mendoza-Pinto, R. Sanchez Perez, R. Sanchez Porras and M. Garcia-Carrasco

Background: On-site cardiac surgery is not widely available in developing countries despite a high prevalence of coronary artery disease.

Objectives: To analyze the safety, feasibility and cost-effectiveness of transradial percutaneous coronary intervention without on-site cardiac surgery in a community hospital in a developing country.

Methods: Of the 174 patients who underwent PCI[1] for the first time in our center, we analyzed two groups: stable coronary disease and acute myocardial infarction. The primary endpoint was the rate of complications during the first 24 hours after PCI. We also analyzed the length of hospital stay and the rate of hospital readmission in the first week after PCI, and compared costs between the radial and femoral approaches.

Results: The study group comprised 131 patients with stable coronary disease and 43 with acute MI[2]. Among the patients with stable coronary disease 8 (6.1%) had pulse loss, 12 (9.16%) had on-site hematoma, and 3 (2.29%) had bleeding at the site of the puncture. Among the patients with acute MI, 3 (6.98) had pulse loss and 5 (11.63%) had bleeding at the site of the puncture. There were no cases of atriovenous fistula or nerve damage. In the stable coronary disease group, 130 patients (99%) were discharged on the same day (2.4 ± 2 hours). In the acute MI group, the length of stay was 6.6 ± 2.5 days with at least 24 hours in the intensive care unit. There were no hospital readmissions in the first week after the procedure. The total cost, which includes equipment related to the specific approach and recovery room stay, was significantly lower with the radial approach compared to the femoral approach (US$ 500 saving per intervention).

Conclusions: The transradial approach was safe and feasible in a community hospital in a developing country without on-site cardiac surgery backup. The radial artery approach is clearly more cost effective than the femoral approach.






[1] PCI = percutaneous coronary intervention



[2] MI = myocardial infarction


July 2009
D. Freimark, M. Arad, S. Matetzky, I. DeNeen, L. Gershovitz, N. Koren Morag, N. Hochberg, Y. Makmal and M. Shechter

Background: Chronic heart failure is associated with excessive hospitalizations and poor prognosis.

Objectives: To summarize the 5 year experience of a single-center CHF[1] day care service, detect the cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular events, and evaluate the safety of the treatments provided.

Methods: We retrospectively studied all patients admitted to the CHF day care service of the Sheba Medical Center between September 2000 and September 2005.

Results: Advanced (New York Heart Association class III-IV) CHF patients (n=190), mean age 65 ± 12 years and left ventricular ejection fraction 25 ± 11%, were treated for 6 hourly biweekly visits; 77% had ischemic and 23% had non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. Treatment included: intravenous diuretic combinations (91%), intermittent low dose (≤ 5 mg/kg/min) dobutamine (87%), low dose (≤ 3 mg/kg/min) dopamine (38%), intravenous iron preparation and/or blood (47%), and intravenous nitropruside (36%). Follow-up of at least 1 year from initiation of therapy was completed in 158 of 190 patients (83%). Forty-six (29.3%) died: 23% due to CHF exacerbation, 5.7% from infection, 4.4% from sudden cardiac death, 3.8% from malignancy, 2.5% from malignant arrhythmias, 1.9% from renal failure, 1.3% from stroke, and 0.6% from myocardial infarction. There were only 0.68 rehospitalizations/patient/year; the most frequent cause being CHF exacerbation (16.5%).

Conclusions: Our study demonstrates the safety and potential benefits of a supportive day care service for advanced CHF patients. Multidrug intravenous treatment, accompanied by monitoring of electrolytes, hemoglobin and cardiac rhythm, along with education and psychological support, appear to reduce morbidity in advanced CHF patients and may have contributed to the lower than expected mortality/hospitalization rate.






[1] CHF = chronic heart failure



 
April 2007
A. Eisen, A. Tenenbaum, N. Koren-Morag, D. Tanne, J. Shemesh, A. Golan, E. Z. Fisman, M. Motro, E. Schwammenthal and Y. Adler

Background: Coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in adults, and cerebrovascular disease is associated with the presence of symptomatic and asymptomatic CHD[1]. Several studies noted an association between coronary calcification and thoracic aorta calcification by several imaging techniques, but this association has not yet been examined in stable angina pectoris patients with the use of spiral computed tomography.

Objectives: To examine by spiral CT the association between the presence and severity of CC[2] and thoracic aorta calcification in patients with stable angina pectoris.

Methods: The patients were enrolled in ACTION (A Coronary Disease Trial Investigating Outcome with Nifedipine GITS) in Israel. The 432 patients (371 men and 61 women aged 40–89 years) underwent chest CT and were evaluated for CC and aortic calcification.

Results: CC was documented in 90% of the patients (n=392) and aortic calcification in 70% (n=303). A significant association (P < 0.05) was found between severity of CC and severity of aortic calcification (as measured by area, volume and slices of calcification). We also found an association between the number of coronary vessels calcified and the presence of aortic calcification: 90% of patients with triple-vessel disease (n=157) were also positive for aortic calcification (P < 0.05). Age also had an effect: 87% of patients ≥ 65 years (n=219) were positive for both coronary and aortic calcification (P = 0.005) while only 57% ≤ 65 (n=209) were positive for both (P = 0.081).

Conclusions: Our study demonstrates a strong association between the presence and severity of CC and the presence and severity of calcification of thoracic aorta in patients with stable angina pectoris as detected by spiral CT.

 






[1] CHD = coronary heart disease



[2] CC = coronary calcification


December 2005
R. Bitzur, D. Harats

Epidemiologic data demonstrate a long-linear realationship between low density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels and risk of coronary heart disease.

November 2005
M. Shechter, R. Beigel, S. Matetzky, D. Freimark, P. Chouraqui.
 Statins play an important role in the treatment and prevention of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. Currently, however, despite its important qualities, the use of statin therapy in the treatment of CAD patients ranges only between 30 and 60% in Europe, the United States and Israel. A wide gap still exists between the numerous scientific publications demonstrating the beneficial effects of statins and the low rate of implementing the guidelines in practice. A Medline search up to June 2005 on all prospective, double-blind, randomized clinical trials evaluating the impact of intensive statin therapy (any statin dose >40 mg/daily) on clinical outcomes after a 1 year follow-up revealed only eight trials. In all the eight trials, with a follow-up period of 12–60 months, intensive statin therapy was significantly more effective than and at least as safe as placebo or other standard statin regimens. Thus, based on the current evidence-based medicine, intensive statin therapy enables more patients with CAD to achieve the current National Cholesterol Education Program goal for low density lipoprotein, while ensuring a relatively high safety profile.


 

July 2005
G. Blinder, J. Benhorin, D. Koukoui, Z. Roman and N. Hiller
 Background: Multi-detector spiral computed tomography with retrospective electrocardiography-gated image reconstruction allows detailed anatomic imaging of the heart, great vessels and coronary arteries in a rapid, available and non-invasive mode.

Objectives: To investigate the spectrum of findings in 32 consecutive patients with chest pain who underwent CT coronary angiogram in order to determine the clinical situations that will benefit most from this new technique.

Methods: Thirty-two patients with chest pain were studied by MDCT[1] using 4 x 1 mm cross-sections, at 500 msec rotation with pitch 1–1.5, intravenous non-ionic contrast agent and a retrospectively ECG-gated reconstruction algorithm. The heart anatomy was evaluated using multi-planar reconstructions in the axial, long and short heart axes planes. Coronary arteries were evaluated using dedicated coronary software and the results were compared to those of the conventional coronary angiograms in 12 patients. The patients were divided into four groups according to the indication for the study: group A – patients with high probability for coronary disease; group B – patients after CCA[2] with undetermined diagnosis; group C – patients after cardiac surgery with possible anatomic derangement; and group D – symptomatic patients after coronary artery bypass graft, before considering conventional coronary angiography.

Results: Artifacts caused by coronary motion, heavy calcification and a lumen diameter smaller than 2 mm were the most frequent reasons for non-evaluable arteries. Assessment was satisfactory in 83% of all coronary segments. The overall sensitivity of 50% stenosis was 74% (85% for main vessels) with a specificity of 96%. Overall, the CTCA[3] results were critical for management in 18 patients.

Conclusions: Our preliminary experience suggests that CTCA is a reliable and promising technique for the detection of coronary artery stenosis as well as for a variety of additional cardiac and coronary structural abnormalities.


 


[1] MDCT = multi-detector computed tomography

[2] CCA = conventional coronary angiography

[3] CTCA = CT coronary angiogram


November 2002
Jorge Rouvier, MD, Claudio Gonzalez, MD, Alejandra Scazziota, PhD and Raul Altman, MD

Background: Elevated fibrinogen, considered an independent risk factor for coronary disease, stratifies an individual as high risk for coronary disease. A risk marker requires little intra-individual variability during a long period.

Objectives: To establish intra-individual variability of fibrinogen levels in patients with coronary disease.

Methods: We investigated fibrinogen levels prospectively in four blood samples drawn from 267 patients with a history of arterial disease (arterial group) and from 264 patients with cardiac valve replacements (valvular group). The samples were taken during the course of 78.7 and 78.8 days from the arterial and valvular groups respectively.

Results: Marked intra-individual dispersion with a reliability coefficient of 0.541 was found in the arterial group and 0.547 in the valvular group. The Bland-Altman test showed low probability to obtain similar results in different samples from the same individual. These results show large intra-individual variability, with similarities in the arterial as well as in the valvular group.

Conclusions: It is not possible to stratify a patient by a specific fibrinogen dosage.

January 2001
Rasmi Magadle, MD, Paltiel Weiner, MD, Alexander Sotzkover, MD and Noa Berar-Yanay, MD
April 2000
Edward G. Abinader MD FRCPI, Dawod S. Sharif MD, Leonid Kharash MD and Kira Mamedov MD

Background: The arrival of 610,000 new immigrants to Israel from the former Soviet republics accounted for 58% of the population growth in the early 1990s.

Objective: To compare the coronary angiographic findings and risk factors between the new immigrants and local Jewish and Arab patients in this era of cost containment.

Methods and Results: A total of 550 consecutive patients - 314 Jews, 95 new immigrants and 141 Arabs - were catheterized and analyzed during a 5 month period in 1995. Of this group 403 were males (73%). The mean age was 63.6±10.2 years among new immigrants, 62.4±9.4 among Jews, and 55.1±10.9 among Arabs (P<0.05). Immigrants, including those under age 60, had the highest prevalence of multivessel disease (88.7%). Arabs had a high prevalence of single vessel disease (34.6%) and a low prevalence of multivessel (65.4%) and left main coronary disease (5.6%). Age, gender, risk factors and ethnic origin in descending order were determinants of the extent of coronary angiographic disease as revealed by multiple regression analysis.

Conclusion: New immigrants had the most extensive angiographic coronary involvement, while Arab patients were younger and had less severe coronary artery disease. More intensive risk factor modification may have a major impact on disease progression particularly in the new immigrant subgroup. 

Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel