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עמוד בית
Tue, 25.06.24

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June 2020
Ilan Merdler MD MHA, Mustafa Gabarin MD, Itamar Loewenstein MD, Sivan Letourneau MD, David Zahler MD, Aviram Hochstadt MD, Yishay Szekely MD, Shmuel Banai MD and Yacov Shacham MD

Background: Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for primary reperfusion in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has largely been superseded byf primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and is estimated to be performed in ≤ 5% of STEMI cases.

Objectives: To compare early CABG (within 30 days following admission) and primary PCI outcomes following STEMI.

Methods: We analyzed a retrospective cohort of patients hospitalized with acute STEMI for early reperfusion therapy between January 2008 and June 2016. Short- and long-term outcomes were assessed for patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI vs. early CABG as reperfusion therapy.

Results: The study comprised 1660 STEMI patients, 38 of whom (2.3%) underwent CABG within 30 days of presentation. Unadjusted 30-day mortality was more than twice as high in the CABG group (7.5%) than in the PCI group (3.3%); however, it did not reach statistical significance. Similar results were demonstrated for mortality rates beyond 30 days (22% vs. 14%, P = 0.463). All patients undergoing CABG beyond 72 hours following admission survived past 2 years. Multivariate analysis found no differences between the two groups in long-term mortality risk. propensity score matched long-term mortality comparison (30 days–2 years) yielded a 22% mortality rate in the CABG groups compared with 14% in the PCI group (P < 0.293).

Conclusion: Early CABG was performed in only a minority of STEMI patients. This high-risk patient population demonstrated worse outcomes compared to patients undergoing PCI. Performing surgery beyond 72 hours following admission may be associated with lower risk.

December 2019
Dror B Leviner MD, Guy Witberg MD, Amir Sharon MD, Yosif Boulos BsC, Alon Barsheshet MD, Erez Sharoni MD, Dan Spiegelstein MD, Hana Vaknin-Assa MD, Dan Aravot MD, Ran Kornowski MD and Abid Assali MD

Background: Current guidelines for choosing between revascularization modalities may not be appropriate for young patients.

Objectives: To compare outcomes and guide treatment options for patients < 40 years of age, who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) between 2008 and 2018.

Methods: Outcomes were compared for 183 consecutive patients aged < 40 years who underwent PCI or CABG between 2008 and 2018, Outcomes were compared as time to first event and as cumulative events for non-fatal outcomes.

Results: Mean patient age was 36.3 years and 96% were male. Risk factors were similar for both groups. Drug eluting stents were implemented in 71% of PCI patients and total arterial revascularization in 74% of CABG patients. During a median follow-up of 6.5 years, 16 patients (8.6%) died. First cardiovascular events occurred in 35 (38.8%) of the PCI group vs. 29 (31.1%) of the CABG group (log rank P = 0.022), repeat events occurred in 96 vs. 51 (P < 0.01), respectively. After multivariate adjustment, CABG was associated with a significantly reduced risk for first adverse event (hazard ratio [HR] 0.305, P < 0.01) caused by a reduction in repeat revascularization. CABG was also associated with a reduction in overall repeat events (HR 0.293, P < 0.01). There was no difference in overall mortality between CABG and PCI.

Conclusions: Young patients with coronary disease treated by CABG showed a reduction in the risk for non-fatal cardiac events. Mortality was similar with CABG and PCI.

July 2015
Michael Papiashvili MD, Ehud Deviri MD, Ilan Bar MD and Lior Sasson MD

Background: The efficacy of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy in patients with previous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery is controversial.

Objectives: To investigate whether skeletonized left internal mammary artery (LIMA) mobilization contributes to the development of severe adhesions, which will affect what type of lung surgery (open or closed procedure) will be required in the future.

Methods: Eight patients (mean age 73.9 years) with previous CABG surgery using a LIMA to left anterior descending (LAD) graft underwent left-sided lobectomy for operable non-small cell lung carcinoma. 

Results: The lobectomy by thoracotomy rate was 62.5% (5 patients), generally in patients with tumors in the left upper lobe or in patients post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy, while the video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy rate was 37.5% (3 patients). Mean hospital stay was 8.3 days. There was no mortality or major morbidity, apart from six minor complications in four patients (50%) (air leak, atrial fibrillation, atelectasis, pneumonia). 

Conclusions: Patients with operable non-small cell lung carcinoma following CABG surgery who need left upper lobe resection do not benefit from the video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery technique due to significant adhesions between the LIMA to LAD graft and the lung. The method of preserving a small portion of the lung on the LIMA to LAD graft may help during left upper lobe resections. Adhesions in the left pleural space after LIMA mobilization appear to generally minimally affect left lower lobe video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery.

 

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