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May 2023
Haim Krespin MD, Lior Saban MD, Eran Israeli MD, Mordechai Shimonov MD, Tomer Greener MD

Pancreaticopleural fistula (PPF) is a rare complication of pancreatitis and usually constitutes a diagnostic challenge. There are many causes for recurrent and chronic pancreatitis, with the main etiology being alcohol and choledocholithiasis [1]. However, the association between pancreatic divisum (PD), a common congenital anomaly of the pancreas that is rarely symptomatic, and complications of pancreatitis is still not firmly established [2]. Furthermore, the optimal management of PPF is still uncertain due to its rarity [3]. We describe a rare case of a 45-year-old woman with recurrent pancreatitis that presented with a PPF on the background of PD, successfully managed with conservative treatment. The purpose of this report is to highlight the rare association between PPF and PD together with the excellent response to conservative therapy.

August 2021
Yaniv Steinfeld MD, Roi Akian MD, Alexey Rovitsky MD, Natalia Puchkov MD, and Yaniv Keren MD

Background: In recent years, treatment for Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) went through radical changes: from the conservative non-weight bearing approach to a functional protocol. This functional protocol allows complete weight bearing after only 2 weeks by placing the foot in a plastic boot in tapered down equines and using interchangeable wedges under the heel. This change of approach has dramatically lowered the rate of re-rupture.

Objectives: To describe our preliminary results with this functional protocol and to assess outcome measures in the functional conservative treatment.

Methods: The study comprised 15 people who were evaluated clinically and by sonograph. We measured calf circumference, ankle joint range of motion (ROM), and single-leg heel-rise test (SLHRT). In addition, standard scoring methods (Achilles Tendon Rupture Score and Physical Activity Scale) were examined.

Results: In our cohort 14 people successfully gained SLHRT. The mean Achilles Tendon Rupture Score functional questionnaire and Physical Activity Scale physical activity questionnaire score was 85.6 of 100, and 4.7 of 6, respectively. There were no significant differences in ankle ROM compared to the uninjured limb. There was statistically significant reduction in the calf circumference and soleus muscle thickness sonographically.

Conclusions: It seems that the conservative functional treatment of ATR demonstrates good functional outcomes, with the patients returning to close to normal activity, although noted muscle wasting and weakness. This protocol presents a true alternative to surgery and should be considered for most non-insertional Achilles tendon tears

December 2014
Yaron S. Brin MD, Ezequiel Palmanovich MD, Eran Dolev MD, Meir Nyska MD and Benyamin J. Kish MD

Background: A clavicular fracture accounts for 2.6%–5% of adult fractures. Fractures in the middle-third (OTA 15-B) represent 69%–82% of all clavicular fractures. There is no consensus among orthopedic surgeons regarding treatment for these fractures; many support conservative treatment even for displaced middle-third clavicular fractures, while others choose operative treatment.

Objectives: To assess the attitudes of orthopedic surgeons regarding treatment of displaced mid-shaft clavicular fractures.

Methods: We conducted a survey in which we interviewed orthopedic surgeons from various countries during the 2012 EFORT meeting in Berlin. The questionnaire included an X-ray of a displaced middle-third clavicular fracture, as well as questions regarding the surgeon’s proposed treatment plan.

Results: A total of 177 orthopedic surgeons completed the questionnaire; 49% preferred operative treatment for a displaced middle-third clavicular fracture. Among the orthopedic trauma specialists, 58% suggested operative treatment, as did 82% of shoulder specialists. Most surgeons preferred a locking plate for fixation.

Conclusions: The treatment approach for a displaced middle-third clavicular fracture seems to be evenly split between conservative and operative approaches. The tendency toward operative treatment was even more remarkable among orthopedic trauma specialists and shoulder specialists who completed the questionnaire. Most surgeons prefer a locking plate as a fixation system for this type of fracture. 

December 2009
O. Barak, R. Elazary, L. Appelbaum, A. Rivkind and G. Almogy

Background: Current treatment options for acute calculous cholecystitis include either early cholecystectomy, or conservative treatment consisting of intravenous antibiotics and an interval cholecystectomy several weeks later. Percutaneous drainage is reserved for patients in whom conservative therapy failed or as a salvage procedure for high risk patients.

Objective: To identify clinical and radiographic factors leading to failure of conservative treatment.

Methods: We prospectively collected data on consecutive patients admitted with the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. Parameters were compared between patients who were successfully treated conservatively and those who required percutaneous cholecystostomy. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors for failure of conservative treatment. 

Results: The study population comprised 103 patients with a median age of 60 who were treated for acute cholecystitis. Twenty-seven patients (26.2%) required PC[1]. On univariate analysis, age above 70 years, diabetes, elevated white blood cell count, tachycardia (> 100 beats/min) at admission, and a distended gallbladder (> 5 cm transverse diameter) were found to be significantly more common in the PC group (P < 0.001). WBC[2] was higher in the PC group throughout the initial 48 hours. On multivariate analysis, age above 70 (odds ratio 3.6), diabetes (OR[3] 9.4), tachycardia at admission (OR 5.6), and a distended gallbladder (OR 8.5) were predictors for cholecystostomy (P < 0.001). Age above 70 (OR 5.2) and WBC > 15,000 (OR 13.7) were predictors for failure of conservative treatment after 24 and 48 hours (P < 0.001). 

Conclusions: Age above 70, diabetes, and a distended gallbladder are predictors for failure of conservative treatment and such patients should be considered for early cholecystostomy. Persistently elevated WBC (> 15,000) suggests refractory disease and should play a central role in the clinical follow-up and decision-making process for elderly patients with acute cholecystitis.


 




[1] PC = percutaneous cholecystostomy



[2] WBC = white blood cells



[3] OR = odds ratio


May 2005
E. Segev, D. Keret, F. Lokiec, A. Yavor, S. Wientroub, E. Ezra and S. Hayek
 Background: The preferred conservative treatment for congenital idiopathic clubfoot deformity remains a controversial issue.


Objectives: To compare the outcomes of two groups of CICF[1] patients who underwent two different treatment protocols.

Methods: The study cohort included 72 infants treated in our hospital from August 1998 to December 2002. Group 1 comprised 40 infants (61 clubfeet) who were treated by a traditional method (a modification of the Kite and Lovell technique), and group 2 consisted of 32 infants (48 clubfeet) who were treated with the Ponseti technique. Both groups were similar in age, gender and severity of the deformity (Dimeglio scoring system)

Results: After an average follow-up of 54.9 months (range 44–68), 35 (57%) clubfeet in group 1 required surgical intervention and 27 (44%) clubfeet had a residual deformity at last follow-up. In the Ponseti group, 45 (94%) clubfeet were fully corrected at last follow-up (average 29.2 months, range 16–45) while 3 (6%) clubfeet had residual deformity and required surgery. Tendo-Achilles tenotomy was performed with no complications in 47 clubfeet (in group 2) at an average age of 2.4 months (range 2–4 months).

Conclusions: Even after a relatively short follow‑up period, our success rate with the Ponseti approach already appears to be significantly higher and to bear fewer complications than the traditional treatment, in agreement with the results published by other medical centers. We now endorse the Ponseti technique of conservative manipulative treatment for congenital idiopathic clubfoot in our department.


 





[1] CICF = congenital idiopathic clubfoot


September 2004
I. Dudkiewicz, A. Oran, M. Salai, R. Palti and M. Pritsch

Background: Adhesive capsulitis, also termed “frozen shoulder,” is controversial by definition and diagnostic criteria that are not sufficiently understood. The clinical course of this condition is considered as self-limiting and is divided into three clinical phases. Several treatment methods for adhesive capsulitis have been reported in the literature, none of which has proven superior to others.

Objectives: To evaluate the long-term follow-up of patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis who were treated conservatively.

Methods: We conducted a long-term follow-up (range 5.5–16 years, mean 9.2 years) of 54 patients suffering from idiopathic adhesive capsulitis. All patients were treated with physical therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

Results: An increased statistically significant improvement (P < 0.00001) was found between the first and last visits to the polyclinic in all measured movement directions: elevation and external and internal rotation.

Conclusions: Conservative treatment (physical therapy and NSAIDs[1]) is a good long-term treatment regimen for idiopathic adhesive capsulitis.






[1] NSAIDs = non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs


June 2004
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