• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Thu, 18.04.24

Search results


May 2021
Lea Kahanov MD, José E. Cohen MD, Shifra Fraifeld MBA, Cezar Mizrahi MD, Ronen R. Leker MD, Samuel Moscovici MD, and Sergey Spektor MD PhD

Background: Superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery microvascular bypass (STA-MCA MVB) is an important strategy for the management of selected patients.

Objective: To present our 19-year experience with STA-MCA MVB.

Methods: Data for consecutive patients who underwent STA-MCA MVB from 2000–2019 due to moyamoya/moyamoya-like disease, complex intracranial aneurysms, or intractable brain ischemia due to internal carotid artery or MCA occlusive disease with repeated ischemic events were retrospectively analyzed under a waiver of informed consent. Key surgical steps and the important role of neuroendovascular interventions are presented. Surgical results and late outcomes were analyzed.

Results: The study included 32 patients (17 women [53%], 15 men [47%]), mean age 42.94 years (range 16–66). The patients underwent 37 STA-MCA MVB procedures during the study period: 22 with moyamoya/moyamoya-like disease (69%) underwent 27 surgeries (five bilateral); 7 patients with complex aneurysms (22%) and 3 patients with vascular occlusive disease (9%) underwent unilateral bypass. Five of seven aneurysms were treated with coiling or flow-diverter stent implant prior to bypass surgery; two were clipped during the bypass procedure. There were no surgical complications, no perioperative mortality, and no death from complications related to neurovascular disease at late follow-up. Transient neurological deficits following 7/37 surgeries (19%) resolved with no permanent neurologic sequelae. Transient ischemic attacks occurred only in the immediate postoperative period in four patients (11%).

Conclusions: In specific cases, STA-MCA MVB is a feasible and clinically effective procedure. It is important to preserve this technique in the surgical armamentarium

October 2020
Amal Silawy MD, Majed Odeh MD, Nina Borissovsky MD, and Gleb Slobodin MD
August 2012
R. Eichel, D. Arkadir, S.T. Khoury, A. Werber, S. Kahana-Merhavi, J.M. Gomori, T. Ben-Hur, J.E. Cohen and R.R. Leker
Background: Only 0.5% of stroke patients in Israel are treated with endovascular multi-modal reperfusion therapy (MMRT) each year.

Objectives: To assess our experience with MMRT over the last decade.

Methods: We analyzed data from our stroke registry of patients undergoing MMRT during 2002¨C2011. All patients underwent multi-parametric imaging studies including subtraction angiography according to a predetermined algorithm. Stroke severity was measured with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Disability was measured with the modified Ranking Scale (mRS) and classified as favorable (mRS ¡Ü 2) or unfavorable. Target vessel recanalization was determined with the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) scale.

Results: During the study period 204 patients were treated 166 of them had complete data sets including mRS scores at 90 days and were included in the analysis. Favorable outcomes at 90 days post-stroke were observed in 37% of patients and the mortality rate was 25%. Patients with favorable outcomes were younger, had significantly lower NIHSS scores on admission and discharge, and more often had complete target vessel recanalization (TIMI 3). On regression analysis the only factor associated with favorable outcome was TIMI 3, whereas increasing age and NIHSS scores on admission and discharge were predictors of poor outcome.

Conclusions: Our data show that MMRT can be successfully implemented in patients with severe stroke in Israel. More than a third of our patients with severe ischemic strokes who could not receive acute treatment were functionally independent after MMRT, demonstrating that this procedure is an important alternative for patients who are not candidates for intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or do not achieve recanalization with tPA.
January 2006
D. Tanne, U. Goldbourt, S. Koton, E. Grossman, N. Koren-Morag, M. S. Green and N. M. Bornstein

Background: There are no national data on the burden and management of acute cerebrovascular disease in Israel.

Objectives: To delineate the burden, characteristics, management and outcomes of hospitalized patients with acute cerebrovascular disease in Israel, and to examine adherence to current guidelines.

Methods: We prospectively performed a national survey in all 28 hospitals in Israel admitting patients with acute cerebrovascular events (stroke or transient ischemic attacks) during February and March 2004.

Results: During the survey period 2,174 patients were admitted with acute cerebrovascular disease (mean age 71 ± 13 years, 47% women; 89% ischemic stroke or TIA[1], 7% intracerebral hemorrhage and 4% undetermined stroke). Sixty-two percent of patients were admitted to departments of Medicine and a third to Neurology, of which only 7% were admitted to departments with a designated stroke unit. Head computed tomography was performed during hospitalization in 93% of patients. The overall rate of urgent thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke was 0.5%. Among patients with ischemic stroke or TIA, 94% were prescribed an antithrombotic medication at hospital discharge, and among those with atrial fibrillation about half were prescribed warfarin. Carotid duplex was performed in 30% and any vascular imaging study in 36% of patients with ischemic events. The mean length of hospital stay was 12 ± 27 days for ICH[2] and 8 ± 11 days for ischemic stroke. Among patients with ICH, 28% died and 66% died or had severe disability at hospital discharge, and for ischemic stroke the corresponding rates were 7% and 41% respectively. Mortality rates within 3 months were 34% for ICH and 14% for ischemic stroke.

Conclusions: This national survey demonstrates the high burden of acute stroke in Israel and reveals discordance between existing guidelines and current practice. The findings highlight important areas for which reorganization is imperative for patients afflicted with acute stroke.






[1] TIA = transient ischemic attack

[2] ICH = intracerebral hemorrhage


Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel