• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Sun, 26.05.24

Search results


April 2000
Arnon D. Cohen MD, Yoram Cohen MD, Maximo Maislos MD and Dan Buskila PhD

Background: Previous studies have suggested that prolactin may serve as an indicator of disease progression in breast cancer.

Objectives: To evaluate the use of PRL as a serum tumor marker in patients with breast cancer.

Methods: PRL serum level was determined in 99 breast cancer patients and compared with CA 15-3 serum level.

Results: Elevated serum level of PRL (>20 ng/ml) was found in 8 of 99 patients (8.1%). A stratified analysis of prolactin levels according to therapy revealed that PRL levels was increased in 8 of 55 untreated patients (14.5%), but not in patients who received hormonal or chemotherapy in the 3 months preceding the test (0/42 patients, P=0.009). However, mean PRL level was similar in patients with no evidence of disease activity and in patients with active disease (10.2 vs. 8.2 ng/ml, NS). In comparison, CA 15-3 mean level was significantly lower in patients with no evidence of disease as compared to patients with active disease (18.2 vs. 144.7 units/ml, P<0.001). PRL level was increased in 6 of 60 patients (10%) with no evidence of disease and in 2 of 39 (5.2%) with active disease (NS). In comparison, CA 15-3 level was increased in 3 of 60 patients (5%) with no evidence of disease and in 24 of 39 (61.5%) with active disease (P<0.001).

Conclusions: PRL levels are decreased following hormonal or chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer and there is no correlation between PRL serum level and the state of disease. Further studies are needed to clarify a possible clinical significance of hyperprolactinemia in a subset of patients with breast cancer.

____________________________________

PRL = prolactin

March 2000
Israel Hodish, MD, David Ezra, MD, Hanan Gur, MD, Rephael Strugo, MD and David Olchovsky, MD
January 2000
Zvi Fireman MD, Leonid Trost MD, Yael Kopelman MD, Arie Segal MD and Amos Sternberg MD

Background: Previous studies have published controversial results regarding a connection between Helicobacter pylori infection and colorectal cancer. One possible mechanism is increased gastrin secretion in subjects infected with H. pylori, insofar as gastrin is known to be a trophic factor for the colonic mucosa.

Objectives: To investigate a possible role of gastrin secretion in H. pylori infection associated with colorectal cancer, and determine whether H. pylori infection is a factor in this disease.

Methods: The serum gastrin levels and the presence of H. pylori IgG antibodies were measured in 51 colorectal cancer patients and 51 control subjects. The cancer patients were also tested for carcinoembryonic antigen and CA 19-9.

Results: H. pylori IgG antibodies were found in the serum of 41 (80.4%) of the cancer patients compared to 32 (62.7%) of the control subjects (P=0.05). A significant correlation was found between CA 19-9 (γ=0.3432, n=49, P=0.01) and seropositive H. pylori IgG antibodies in the serum of the cancer patients (odds ratio 2.43, and 95% confidence limit 0.99-5.95), but none between CEA and H. pylori IgG antibodies nor between the serum gastrin level and the presence of colorectal cancer.

Conclusions: The results of this study indicate a significant association between seropositive H. pylori IgG antibodies and elevated CA 19-9 in colorectal cancer patients, but no correlation between the serum gastrin level and the presence of this cancer. H. pylori seropositivity is more prevalent in patients with colorectal cancer.
 

Isabel Zvibel, PhD, Yaron Mintz, MD, Shlomo Brill, MD, Zamir Halpern, MD and Moshe Papa, MD
September 1999
Derek Le-Roith, MD, Michael Karas, MD, Shoshana Yakar, MD, Bao-He Qu, MD, Yiping Wu, MD, and Vicky A. Blakesley, MD.
Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel