• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Sun, 26.05.24

Search results


September 2015
Emad Matanes MD, Sari Boulus MD and Lior Lowenstein MD MS

Background: In the last decade the number of robotic devices and the medical procedures utilizing them increased significantly around the world.

Objective: To evaluate the implementation of robotic surgeries in Israel in various surgical disciplines.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study accessing information about the annual purchases of robots, the number of physicians trained for their use, and the number of robotic surgeries performed each year, according to indications of surgery and the disciplines of the operating medical staff. The data were taken from the database of Intuitive Surgical Inc.

Results: Six robots were purchased by six medical centers in Israel during the years 2008–2013. There are currently 150 physicians trained to use the robot in one of the simulators of Intuitive Surgical Inc. Of them, 104 are listed as active robotic surgeons. Most of these physicians are urologists, gynecologists, or general surgeons. The number of robotic surgeries increased each year in all fields in which it was implemented. In 2013, 975 robotic surgeries were performed in Israel. Of them, 52% were performed by urologists; 80% of which were radical prostatectomy. 

Conclusions: The use of robotic surgery increased considerably in Israel over recent years, in urology, gynecology, general surgery, and otolaryngology. Despite the lack of conclusive evidence of the advantages of robotic surgery over the laparoscopic approach, the market power and the desire to be at the technological forefront drive many medical centers to purchase the robot and to train physicians in its use.

 

April 2007
E. Markusohn, A. Roguin, A. Sebbag, D. Aronson, R. Dragu, S. Amikam, M. Boulus, E. Grenadier, A. Kerner, E. Nikolsky, W. Markiewicz, H. Hammerman and M. Kapeliovich

Background: The decision to perform primary percutaneous coronary intervention in unconscious patients resuscitated after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is challenging because of uncertainty regarding the prognosis of recovery of anoxic brain damage and difficulties in interpretation of ST segment deviations. In ST elevation myocardial infarction patients after OHCA[1], primary PCI[2] is generally considered the only option for reperfusion. There are few published studies and no randomized trial has yet been performed in this specific group of patients.

Objectives: To define the demographic, clinical and angiographic characteristics, and the prognosis of STEMI[3] patients undergoing primary PCI after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of medical records and used the prospectively acquired information from the Rambam Primary Angioplasty Registry (PARR) and the Rambam Intensive Cardiac Care (RICCa) databases.

Results: During the period March1998 to June 2006, 25 STEMI patients (21 men and 4 women, mean age 56 ± 11years) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were treated with primary PCI. The location of myocardial infarction was anterior in 13 patients (52%) and non-anterior in 12 (48%). Cardiac arrest was witnessed in 23 patients (92%), but bystander resuscitation was performed in only 2 patients (8%). Eighteen patients (72%) were unconscious on admission, and Glasgow Coma Scale > 5 was noted in 2 patients (8%). Cardiogenic shock on admission was diagnosed in 4 patients (16%). PCI procedure was successful in 22 patients (88%). In-hospital, 30 day, 6 month and 1 year survival was 76%, 76%, 76% and 72%, respectively. In-hospital, 30 day, 6 month and 1 year survival without severe neurological disability was 68%, 68%, 68% and 64%, respectively.

Conclusions: In a selected group of STEMI patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, primary PCI can be performed with a high success rate and provides reasonably good results in terms of short and longer term survival.

 







[1] OHCA = out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

[2] PCI = percutaneous coronary intervention

[3] STEMI = ST elevation myocardial infarction


Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel