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עמוד בית
Wed, 19.06.24

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May 2022
Herman Avner Cohen MD, Maya Gerstein MD, Vered Shkalim Zemer MD, Sophia Heiman MD, Yael Richenberg MD, Eyal Jacobson MD, and Oren Berkowitz PhD PA-C

Background: On 18 March 2020, the Israeli Health Ministry issued lockdown orders to mitigate the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Objectives: To assess the association of lockdown orders on telemedicine practice and the effect of social distancing on infectious diseases in a primary care community pediatric clinic as well as the rate of referrals to emergency departments (ED) and trends of hospitalization.

Methods: Investigators performed a retrospective secondary data analysis that screened for visits in a large pediatric center from 1 January to 31 May 2020. Total visits were compared from January to December 2020 during the same period in 2019. Visits were coded during the first lockdown as being via telemedicine or in-person, and whether they resulted in ED referral or hospitalization. Month-to-month comparisons were performed as well as percent change from the previous year.

Results: There was a sharp decline of in-person visits (24%) and an increase in telemedicine consultations (76%) during the first lockdown (p < 0.001). When the lockdown restrictions were eased, there was a rebound of 50% in-person visits (p < 0.05). There was a profound decrease of visits for common infectious diseases during the lockdown period. Substantial decreases were noted for overall visits, ED referrals, and hospitalizations in 2020 compared to 2019.

Conclusions: COVID-19 had a major impact on primary care clinics, resulting in fewer patient-doctor encounters, fewer overall visits, fewer ED referrals, and fewer hospitalizations

December 2021
Noa Berar Yanay MD, Muhammad Abu Arisha MD, and Yaron Berkowitz MD

Background: Hip fracture is common in elderly patients and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Acute kidney injury (AKI) following hip fracture may have additional impact on clinical outcomes.

Objectives: To investigate the incidence of AKI, the risk factors for its occurrence and impact on mortality, timing of surgery, and length of hospitalization (LOS) in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery.

Methods: We retrospectively examined the records of patients who underwent hip fracture surgery between 2013 and 2017. All patients had a baseline serum creatinine value and at least one later value. AKI was defined according to KDIGO guidelines.

Results: The study included 511 patients. Mean age was 72.6 years, 325 males (63.4%); 151 (29.5%) had baseline eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73m2. Of these, 87 (17%) developed AKI. Older age, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and chronic heart condition were significantly more common in patients who developed AKI. Patients with AKI had increased 30-day mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 3.96, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.62–9.7, P = 0.003) and mortality at one year (HR 2.72, 95%CI 1.5–4.9, P = 0.002). AKI was associated with surgery delay > 48 hours (HR 2.241, 95%CI 1.206–4.165, P = 0.011). Mean LOS was 10.9 days and 8 days for patients with AKI and without, respectively, P < 0.0001.

Conclusions: AKI is a common complication in patients with hip fracture and is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality, delayed surgery, and longer hospitalization. Interventions identifying and monitoring patients at risk may contribute to improve the outcomes

January 2019
Ariel S. Berkowitz MD, Tzahi Neuman MD, Shahar Frenkel MD PhD, Ron Eliashar MD, Jeffrey M. Weinberger MD and Nir Hirshoren MD
July 2010
D.I. Nassie, M. Berkowitz, M. Wolf, J. Kronenberg and Y.P. Talmi
July 2008
C. Hartman, D. Berkowitz, B. Weiss, R. Shaoul, A. Levine, O. Eshach Adiv, R. Shapira, A. Fradkin, M. Wilschanski, A. Tamir and R. Shamir

Background: A polymeric diet rich in transforming growth factor-beta 2 used as a single nutrient has been shown to induce remission in 79% of children with Crohn's disease.

Objectives: To summarize the experience of several pediatric gastroenterology units in Israel using a TGFβ2[1]-enriched polymeric diet (Modulen IBD) supplementation in children and adolescents with Crohn's disease.

Methods: In a retrospective study we reviewed the charts of 28 children with Crohn's disease (10 girls, 18 boys) who received, in addition to conventional treatment, Modulen IBD™ as a supplement to their regular nutrition. These children were compared with 18 children supplemented with standard polymeric formula (Ensure Plus®) and 18 children without formula supplementation. We recorded clinical manifestations, growth, and the Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index before and after initiation of the polymeric diet.

Results: The Modulen-treated children showed a significant decrease in PCDAI[2] from 34.3 to 15.7 (P < 0.0001). A significant decrease in PCDAI was recorded also in the Ensure Plus group, from 35 to 22 (P = 0.02) but not in the non-supplemented group. Significant improvements in body mass index (P = 0.01) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (P = 0.03) were recorded at follow-up (median 3.4 months) only in the Modulen IBD group.

Conclusions: In this cohort of children with Crohn's disease, supplementation of the diet with Modulen IBD as well as supplementation with Ensure Plus was associated with a decrease in PCDAI. The children supplemented with Modulen IBD also showed improvement in BMI[3], suggesting an additional advantage of nutritional therapy in children with this disease.






[1] TGF-β2 = transforming growth factor-β2

[2] PCDAI = Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index

[3] BMI = body mass index


June 2008
I. Kassis, Y. Kovalski, D. Magen, D. Berkowitz and I. Zelikovic

Background Voiding cystourethrogram is performed 3–6 weeks after urinary tract infection. This prolongs the interval of prophylactics, reducing the likelihood of performing the procedure.

Objectives To investigate the yield and potential risks/benefits of early compared to late-performance VCUG[1] after UTI[2].

Methods We conducted a prospective study of 84 previously healthy children < 5 years old admitted from October 2001 to November 2002 with first documented UTI. We then divided the 78 patients who had VCUG into two groups and compared them to a control group:  group A – 49 children in whom VCUG was performed within 10 days, group B – 29 children in whom VCUG was performed > 10 days after UTI, and a historical control group C – 82 children in whom VCUG was performed > 4 weeks following UTI.

Results VCUG was performed in 48/48 (100%), 6/35 patients (17.1%), 34/116 patients (29.3%) and vesicoureteral reflux was demonstrated in 38.8%, 37.9%, 39% in groups A, B, C respectively. No significant difference was found between these groups in terms of incidence of VUR[3] and severity and grading of reflux within each group. One case of UTI secondary to VCUG occurred in a patient in whom the procedure was performed 4 months after the diagnosis.

Conclusions Performing VCUG early does not influence detection rate, severity of the VUR, or risk of secondary infection; it shortens the period of prophylactic use and increases performance rate of VCUG, thereby minimizing the risk of failure to detect VUR. The traditional recommendation of performing VCUG 3–6 weeks after the diagnosis of UTI should be reevaluated.






[1] VCUG = voiding cystourethrogram

[2] UTI = urinary tract infection

[3] VUR = vesicoureteral reflux


April 2003
A. Kugelman, Y. Grief, R. Gerhoni-Baruch, D. Berkowitz, L. Anthon Best, L. Guralnik and L. Bentur
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