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עמוד בית
Sun, 25.02.24

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July 2019
Yarden Yavne MD, Anas Kabaha MD, Tsufit Rosen NDSF, Irit Avisar RN LLB MHA, Hedi Orbach MD, Daniela Amital MD MHA and Howard Amital MD MHA

Background: Fibromyalgia is a syndrome of unknown etiology that is characterized by widespread pain, which severely impairs quality of life. Several forms of occupational and alternative therapy have demonstrated beneficial effects in fibromyalgia patients.

Objective: To assess the effects of participation in a floral design course on physical and psychiatric symptoms in a cohort of fibromyalgia patients.

Methods: This study was conducted as an observational study. Women diagnosed with fibromyalgia over the age of 18 were recruited to participate in one of two 12-week flower design (floristry) courses. Demographic details, disease activity indices, and anxiety and depression scores were calculated for all participants at baseline, week 12, and study completion. Physical and mental health of the two groups were compared throughout the study time-points.

Results: The study was completed by 61 female fibromyalgia patients who were included in the final analyses; 31 patients participated in the first floristry course and 30 in the second. Significant improvements in the 36-Item Short Form Survey physical and mental health components, visual analog scale, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores for the entire study population and for each group separately could be seen following participation in each floristry course.

Conclusions: Participation in a floristry course may lead to a significant improvement in pain and psychiatric symptoms in fibromyalgia patients. These findings highlight the potential benefit of utilizing occupational therapy programs, such as a floristry course, for improving quality of life in fibromyalgia.

February 2016
Mohamed Atamney MD, Dan Gutman MD, Eyal Fenig MD, Haim Gutman MD and Inbal Avisar MD
October 2013
L. Avisar, A. Shiyovich, L. Aharonson-Daniel and L. Nesher
 Background: Sudden cardiac death is the most common lethal manifestation of heart disease and often is the first and only indicator. Prompt initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) undoubtedly saves lives. Nevertheless, studies report a low competency of medical students in CPR, mainly due to deterioration of skills following training.

Objectives: To evaluate the retention of CPR skills and confidence in delivering CPR by preclinical medical students.

Methods: A questionnaire and the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) were used to assess confidence and CPR skills among preclinical, second and third-year medical students who had passed a first-aid course during their first year but were not retrained since.

Results: The study group comprised 64 students: 35 were 1 year after training and 29 were 2 years after training. The groups were demographically similar. Preparedness, recollection and confidence in delivering CPR were significantly lower in the 2 years after training group compared to those 1 year after training (P < 0.05). The mean OSCE score was 19.8 ± 5.2 (of 27) lower in those 2 years post- training than those 1 year post-training (17.8 ± 6.35 vs. 21.4 ± 3.4 respectively, P = 0.009). Only 70% passed the OSCE, considerably less in students 2 years post-training than in those 1 year post-training (52% vs. 86%, P < 0.01). Lowest retention was found in checking safety, pulse check, airway opening, rescue breathing and ventilation technique skills. A 1 year interval was chosen by 81% of the participants as the optimal interval for retraining (91% vs. 71% in the 2 years post-training group vs. the 1 year post- training group respectively, P = 0.08).

Conclusions: Confidence and CPR skills of preclinical medical students deteriorate significantly within 1 year post-training, reaching an unacceptable level 2 years post-training. We recommend refresher training at least every year.

 

April 2008
S. Berestizschevsky, D. Weinberger, I. Avisar and R. Avisar
December 2006
R. Avisar, R. Friling, M. Snir, I. Avisar and D. Weinberger

Background: The prevalence and incidence of blindness in Israel appear to be comparable to other western countries. Comparisons are difficult because of different definitions of blindness, and the uniqueness of the Israeli registry for the blind.

Objective: To characterize the population who were registered as Blind in Israel in the years 1998–2003 and estimate the prevalence and incidence of blindness by age and causes of blindness.

Methods: A retrospective review of the annual report of the National Registry for the Blind in Israel between 1998 and 2003 identified 21,585 blind persons who received a certificate for blindness. Blind persons are identified by ophthalmologists throughout Israel and referred to the Registry of the Blind if they have a visual acuity of 3/60 or worse, or a visual field loss of < 20 degrees in their better eye. This report includes prevalence data on 21,585 persons enrolled in this review still alive and living in Israel in 2003. We estimated the prevalence rate of blindness nationwide and the incidence rate for each cause of blindness for every year.

Results: The main leading causes of blindness in Israel in 1998 were (in percent of the total number of newly registered patients): age-related macular degeneration (20.1%), glaucoma (13.8%), myopic maculopathy (12%), cataract (10.4%), diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy (10.1%), and optic atrophy (7.9%), and in 2003, 28%, 11.8%, 7.4%, 6.5%, 14.4% and 6.5% respectively.

Conclusions: The results indicate that the incidence of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy in Israel is increasing, while that of glaucoma, myopic maculopthy, optic atrophy and cataract is decreasing.

April 2003
O. Nevo, E. Avisar, A. Tamir, M.S. Coffler, P. Sumov and I.R. Makhoul

Background: Multifetal pregnancy reduction has been implemented for improving the outcome of multifetal pregnancies. Recent studies reported no difference in pregnancy outcome between reduced twins and non-reduced twins, but the neonatal course and subsequent outcome in reduced twin pregnancies were not well documented.

Objective: To compare the neonatal course and outcome, as well as the gestational and labor characteristics, in twins from reduced multifetal pregnancies and in non-reduced twins.

Methods: This is a retrospective case-control study of the neonatal course of twins from reduced multifetal pregnancies. We found 64 mothers with multifetal pregnancy reduction who delivered twins during 1989–1997; 64 gestational age-matched non-reduced twin pregnancies served as controls. The following neonatal variables were examined: major malformations; small birth weight for gestational age; and neonatal morbidities including respiratory distress syndrome, apnea, pneumothorax, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, hyperbilirubinemia, sepsis, necrotizing enterocolitis, retinopathy of prematurity, seizures, intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, ventriculomegaly, and hydrocephalus. In addition, we evaluated several neonatal interventions (surfactant replacement, mechanical ventilation, phototherapy, total parenteral nutrition), and some laboratory abnormalities (thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, anemia, and hypoglycemia), duration of hospitalization, and neonatal mortality.

Results: Gestational and labor variables were not significantly different between multifetal pregnancies reduced to twins and non-reduced twin pregnancies. The neonatal morbidity and mortality were not significantly different between twin neonates from multifetal pregnancy reduction and non-reduced control twins.

Conclusions: Multifetal pregnancy reduction to twins appears to bear no adverse effect on the intrauterine course of the remaining fetuses or their neonatal course and outcome when born after 28 weeks of gestation.
 

November 2001
Rahamim Avisar, MD, Aharon Arnon, MD, Erez Avisar, BSc and Dov Weinberger, MD

Background: The time to recurrence after surgical removal of primary pterygium (pterygium) and the association between the rate of recurrence and the postoperative interval remain unclear.

Objective: To determine the amount of follow-up time needed to identify recurrence in patients after surgical removal of pterygium.

Methods: We rviewed the files of 143 patients (143 eyes) with recurrent pterygium to determine the interval from surgery to recurrence.

Results: Almost all (91.6%) of the recurrences appeared by 360 days after surgery.

Conclusions: One year is the optimal follow-up time to identify recurrence of pterygium.

January 2000
Rahamim Avisar MD, Nissim Loya MD, Yuval Yassur MD and Dov Weinberger MD

Background: Previous work has suggested an association between increasing size of pterygium and increasing degrees of induced corneal astigmatism.

Objectives: To assess the quantitative relation between pterygium size and induced corneal astigmatism using a computerized corneal analysis system (TMS II) and slit-lamp beam evaluation of pterygium size, and to conclude whether corneal astigmatism is an early indication for surgical intervention.

Methods: We evaluated 94 eyes of 94 patients with unilateral primary pterygium of different sizes, using TMS II and slit-lamp beam measurements of the size of the pterygium (in millimeters) from the limbus to assess parameters of pterygium size with induced corneal astigmatism. Best corrected visual Snellen acuity was performed.

Results: Primary pterygium induced with-the-rule astigmatism. Pterygium extending 16% of the corneal radius or 1.1 mm or less from the limbus produced increasing degrees of induced astigmatism of more than 1.0 diopter. Significant astigmatism was found in 16.16% of 24 eyes with pterygium of 0.2 up to 1.0 mm in size, in 45.45% of 22 eyes with pterygium of 1.1 up to 3.0 mm in size (P≤0.0004), and in 100% of 3 eyes with pterygium of 5.1 up to 6.7 mm in size (P=0.0005). We found that visual acuity was decreased when topographic astigmatism was increased.

Conclusions: When primary pterygium reaches more than 1.0 mm in size from the limbus it induces with-the-rule significant astigmatism (≥1.0 diopter). This significant astigmatism tends to increase with the increasing size of the lesion. Topographic astigmatism tends to be improved by successful removal of the pterygium. These findings suggest that early surgical intervention in the pterygium may be indicated when the lesion is more than 1.0 mm in size from the limbus.

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