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עמוד בית
Sun, 23.06.24

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December 2021
Yuval Avda MD, Jonathan Modai MD, Igal Shpunt MD, Michael Dinerman MD, Yaniv Shilo MD, Roy Croock MD, Morad Jaber MD, Uri Lindner MD, and Dan Leibovici MD

Background: Patients with high-risk prostate cancer are at higher risk of treatment failure, development of metastatic disease, and mortality. There is no consensus on the treatment of choice for these patients, and either radical prostatectomy (RP) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is recommended. Surgery is less common as the initial treatment for high-risk patients, possibly reflecting the concerns regarding morbidity as well as oncological and functional outcomes. Another high-risk group includes patients with failure of previous EBRT or focal treatment. For these patients, salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) can be offered.

Objectives: To describe our experience with surgery of high-risk patients and SRP.

Methods: This cohort included all high-risk patients undergoing RP or SRP at our institution between January 2012 and December 2019. We reviewed the electronic medical charts and collected pathological, functional, and oncological outcomes.

Results: Our cohort included 39 patients; average age was 67.8 years, and average follow-up duration was 40.9 months. The most common postoperative morbidity was transfusion of packed cells. There were no life-threatening events or postoperative mortality. Continence was preserved (zero to one pad) in 76% of the patients. Twenty-three patients (59%) had undetectable prostate specific antigen levels following the surgery, 11 (30%) were treated with either adjuvant or salvage EBRT, and 12 patients (31%) were found with no evidence of disease and no additional treatment was needed.

Conclusions: Radical prostatectomy and SRP are safe options for patients presenting with high-risk prostate cancer, with good functional and oncological outcomes.

April 2019
Or Friedman MD, Ehud Fliss MD, Amir Inbal MD, Ehud Arad MD, Jacob Frand MD and Yoav Barnea MD

Background: There are several methods for primary breast reconstruction following oncologic resection, including alloplastic and autologous-based reconstruction. Major complications that can lead to re-operation and reconstruction failure occur in up to 25% of the patients and necessitate salvage procedures.

Objectives: To present the authors' experience using a pedicled latissimus dorsi (LD) flap for the salvage of complicated and impending failed breast reconstruction.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted of all patients who underwent breast reconstruction salvage by means of an LD flap in our institution during a 5-year period. Demographic, oncologic, surgical, and postoperative data were collected and analyzed.

Results: Seventeen patients underwent breast reconstruction salvage with the LD flap. Fourteen patients had alloplastic reconstruction and three patients had autologous reconstruction. Postoperative complications included wound infection in three patients, minor wound dehiscence in two, and donor site seroma in two. One case of postoperative infection required re-operation with exchange of the implant with a tissue expander. All breast reconstructions were salvaged using the LD flap. Only one patient complained of functional limitations in using the arm of the harvested LD.

Conclusions: The LD flap is a valuable and reliable flap for alloplastic or autologous breast reconstruction salvage and has a high rate of salvage success despite the challenging surgical environment. This flap offers a good cosmetic reconstruction outcome with relatively low donor-site morbidity and high patient satisfaction.

February 2019
Einat Levy MSc MD, Eyal Sela MD, Vadim Letichevsky MD and Ohad Ronen MD

Background: The currently accepted treatment for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) is systemic steroids as first-line and intratympanic steroids as salvage therapy. Intratympanic (IT) treatment is applied worldwide in many different ways with no universally accepted protocol.

Objectives: To present the current disparity in ISSHL management and to discuss the necessity for establishing a common national protocol.

Methods: In 2014 we conducted a national survey by sending questionnaires on ISSHL management to otologists in every otolaryngology department in the country.

Results: The majority of otolaryngology departments (56%) admit patients with sudden sensorineural hearing. Almost two-thirds (61%) of departments recommend supplementary initial treatment in addition to systemic steroids. None of the medical centers offer intratympanic steroid treatment as primary therapy, but 94% offer this treatment as a salvage therapy. Fewer than half the medical centers (44%) consider the maximal period for intratympanic therapy to be 4 weeks since hearing loss appears. Almost half (48%) the departments use intratympanic steroids once every 5–7 days, usually in an ambulatory setting. Almost half (44%) the medical centers tend to use not more than four courses of IT steroids. In 44% of departments an audiogram is performed at the beginning and at the end of the intratympanic course.

Conclusions: Our results demonstrate a variability among Israeli medical centers in many aspects of intratympanic treatment. We believe this reinforces the need for a comparative international study in order to establish a standard protocol.

July 2017
Carlo Salvarani MD, Robert D. Brown Jr MD MPH and Gene G. Hunder MD
January 2017
Benjamin Spieler BA, Jeffrey Goldstein MD, Yaacov R. Lawrence MD, Akram Saad MD, Raanan Berger MD PhD, Jacob Ramon MD, Zohar Dotan MD, Menachem Laufer MD, Ilana Weiss MA, Lev Tzvang MS, Philip Poortmans MD PhD and Zvi Symon MD

Background: Radiotherapy to the prostate bed is used to eradicate residual microscopic disease following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer. Recommendations are based on historical series. 

Objectives: To determine outcomes and toxicity of contemporary salvage radiation therapy (SRT) to the prostate bed. 

Methods: We reviewed a prospective ethics committee-approved database of 229 patients referred for SRT. Median pre-radiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was 0.5 ng/ml and median follow-up was 50.4 months (range 13.7–128). Treatment was planned and delivered using modern three-dimensional radiation techniques. Mean bioequivalent dose was 71 Gy (range 64–83 Gy). Progression was defined as two consecutive increases in PSA level > 0.2 ng/ml, metastases on follow-up imaging, commencement of anti-androgen treatment for any reason, or death from prostate cancer. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and multivariate analysis was performed using STATA. 

Results: Five year progression-free survival was 68% (95%CI 59.8–74.8%), and stratified by PSA was 87%, 70% and 47% for PSA < 0.3, 0.3–0.7, and > 0.7 ng/ml (P < 0.001). Metastasis-free survival was 92.5%, prostate cancer-specific survival 96.4%, and overall survival 94.9%. Low pre-radiation PSA value was the most important predictor of progression-free survival (HR 2.76, P < 0.001). Daily image guidance was associated with reduced risk of gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity (P < 0.005). 

Conclusions: Contemporary SRT is associated with favorable outcomes. Early initiation of SRT at PSA < 0.3 ng/ml improves progression-free survival. Daily image guidance with online correction is associated with a decreased incidence of late toxicity.

 

July 2015
Mauro Calvani MD, Valentino Giorgio MD, Monica Greco MD and Stefano Miceli Sopo MD
June 2015
Sandy Mpho Mosenye MBChB, Josè Antonio Moulton Alvarez MD, Rafael Enrique Cruz Abascal MD, Matthew N. Tanko MBBS FMCPath (Nig), Francesca Cainelli MD and Sandro Vento MD
May 2014
Bonaguri Chiara PHD, Orsoni Jelka Gabriella MD, Russo Annalisa PHD, Rubino Pierangela MD, Bacciu Salvatore MD, Lippi Giuseppe MD Melegari Alessandra PHD, Zavota Laura MD, Ghirardini Stella AO and Mora Paolo MD

Background: Cogan’s syndrome (CS) is a rare autoimmune vasculitis characterized by ocular inflammation and sensorineural hearing loss. CS is divided into a “typical” form with non-syphilitic interstitial keratitis and audiovestibular symptoms, and an “atypical” form with ocular involvement affecting structures other than the cornea. Anti-Hsp70 antibodies were found at variable levels in patients presenting with various forms of autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss (ASNHL).

Objectives: To assess the correlation between anti-Hsp70 antibodies and specific ASNHL subgroups.

Methods: We divided 112 subjects into four groups: 14 subjects with typical CS, 24 with atypical CS, 55 with ASNHL, and 19 control subjects (healthy subjects and patients with systemic autoimmune diseases but no sensorineural hearing or audiovestibular alterations). Patients were tested for serological autoimmunity markers including anti-Hsp70.

Results: Positivity of the anti-Hsp70 antibody test was highest in the typical CS group (92.9%) and lowest in the control group (5.2%). The test was positive in 52.7% of patients in the ASNHL group and 16.6% in the atypical CS group. The paired comparison analysis between groups showed that sensitivity of anti-Hsp70 in the typical CS group was significantly higher, as compared to the other three study groups.

Conclusions: Anti-Hsp70 antibodies can be considered a serological marker of “typical” CS. “Atypical” CS is conceivably a sort of “melting pot” of different forms of autoimmune diseases still characterized by ocular inflammation and sensorineural hearing loss but whose antigenic characteristics need to be further defined.

December 2013
Fernando Salvador, Ana Margarida Antunes, Joana Cunha and Carlos Dias
January 2012
Mauro Calvani, MD, Iride Dello Iacono, MD, Valentina Giorgio, MD, Stefano Miceli Sopo, Valentina Panetta, MD and Salvatore Tripodi, MD.

Background: The diagnostic gold standard for food allergy is an oral food challenge (OFC) with the suspected food. Usually, an OFC is stopped at the onset of mild objective symptoms for fear of severe reactions. However, there is no consensus on this issue.

Objective: To investigate the effectiveness and side effects of a new model of oral milk challenge in order to increase the diagnostic accuracy of cow¡¯s milk protein allergy and reduce the number of many useless elimination diets. This model is characterized by a conservative diagnostic protocol and ¡°step-up cow’s milk administered dosing.¡± The secondary aim was to investigate possible factors influencing severe reactions.   

Methods: Sixty-six children (median age 1 year, range 1¨C18) with suspected immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated cow’s milk allergy performed a conservative oral food challenge (OFC), i.e., the OFC was continued even in the presence of subjective, even repeated, or mild local or multiple organ objective symptoms. If the first objective reaction occurred when the quantity of milk was > 10 ml, the investigator would decide whether to continue the OFC or prescribe a gradual increase in milk feeding at home.

Results: Symptoms developed during the OFC in 42.4% of the children. Local, generalized and severe generalized reactions developed in 11 (16.7%), 11 (16.7%) and 6 (9.1%) children, respectively. Only 14/28 (50%) who developed objective symptoms during the OFC were considered to be affected by cow’s milk allergy. In the remaining 14 both subjective and objective symptoms developed and the OFC was continued without the emergence of additional symptoms. Epinephrine was administered to 6 of the 28 children (21.4%) who developed objective symptoms. All but one had subjective symptoms following the early doses of milk, whereas all children who later tolerated milk had their first subjective or mild symptoms following doses ¡Ý 10 ml.

Conclusions: This new model of oral milk challenge criteria led to frequent severe allergic reactions hence its use in daily practice seems inadvisable. However, our study provides evidence that a severe allergic reaction does not invariably occur if the offending food continues to be administered after the onset of symptoms. If mild symptoms appear at doses higher than 10 ml, continued milk administration, on the same day or in subsequent days, seems to facilitate the development of tolerance and may reduce the number of useless elimination diets.


September 2011
D.A. Galvan, K. Matsushima and H.L. Frankel

Ultrasonography in the intensive care unit (ICU) has become a valuable tool for expeditiously, safely and effectively diagnosing and treating a myriad of conditions commonly encountered in this setting. Most surgeons are familiar with FAST (focused assessment with sonography in trauma) and can readily grasp the fundamentals of a limited or directed ultrasonographic exam. Thus, with appropriate training and practice, surgeons can utilize this tool in visualizing, characterizing and treating life-threatening conditions in their role as intensivists in the surgical ICU (SICU). In this review we will discuss the role of ultrasonography in evaluating the acute cardiac status of a patient in the SICU as well as its use in general critical care for assessing the thoracic, abdominal and vascular systems.
 

June 2011
M. Garcia-Carrasco, C. Mendoza-Pinto, C. Riebeling, M. Sandoval-Cruz, A. Nava, I. Etchegaray-Morales, M. Jimenez-Hernandez, A. Montiel-Jarquin, A. Lopez-Colombo and R. Cervera

 Background: The prevalence of vertebral fractures in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) ranges between 20% and 21.4%, and patients with these fractures have impaired walking and activities of daily living. Moreover, clinical and radiological vertebral fractures have been associated with increased mortality.
 Objectives: To compare the quality of life of patients with SLE[1] with and without vertebral fractures.

Methods: The study group comprised 140 women with SLE undergoing screening for vertebral fractures using a standardized method. SLE disease activity and organ damage were measured by the Mexican Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (MEX-SLEDAI) and Systemic International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology damage index (SLICC), respectively. The QUALEFFO and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale were used to measure health-related quality of life and depression, respectively.

Results: The median age of the 140 patients was 43 years (range 18–76); disease duration was 72 months (range 6–432); 49.7% were menopausal. Thirty-four patients (24.8%) had vertebral fractures (≥ 1), mostly in the thoracic spine. Patients with vertebral fractures had a higher mean age (49.5 ± 13.4 vs. 41 ± 13.2 years, P = 0.001) and disease damage (57.1% vs. 34.4%, P = 0.001). The global QUALEFFO score was not different between the vertebral fractures group and the non-vertebral group. The only significant difference in the QUALEFFO items was in physical function (P = 0.04). A significant correlation was found between the severity of vertebral fractures and the QUALEFFO pain (r = 0.27, P = 0.001) and physical function (r = 0.37, P = 0.02) scores. The number of vertebral fractures correlated only with physical function (r = 0.01).

Conclusions: The HRQOL of women with SLE is low, regardless of whether they have vertebral fractures or not, but patients with vertebral fractures have worse physical function compared to those without. Strategies to improve the HRQOL of patients with SLE with or without vertebral fractures are necessary.






[1] SLE = systemic lupus erythematosus



 
March 2011
O. Beyar Katz, A. Ben Barak, G. Abrahami, N. Arad, Y. Burstein, R. Dvir, S. Fischer, J. Kapelushnik, H. Kaplinsky, A. Toren, S. Vilk-Revel, M. Weintraub, I. Yaniv, S. Linn, B. Futerman and M. Weyl Ben-Arush

Background: Survival in T cell lymphoblastic lymphoma has improved over the past 30 years, largely due to treatment protocols derived from regimens designed for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Objectives: To assess the outcome of the NHL-BFM-95 protocol in children and adolescents hospitalized during the period 1999–2006.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective multi-institutional, non-randomized study of children and adolescents up to age 21 with T cell lymphoma admitted to pediatric departments in six hospitals in Israel, with regard to prevalence, clinical characteristics, pathological characteristics, prognostic factors, overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS). All patients had a minimal follow-up of one year after diagnosis. The study was based on the NHL[1]-BFM[2]-95 protocol.

Results: At a median follow-up of 4 years (range 1–9 years), OS and EFS for all patients was 86.5% and 83.8%, respectively. OS was 86.7% and 83.3% for patients with stage III and stage IV, respectively, and EFS was 83.3% and 83.3%, respectively. EFS was 62.5% for Arab patients and 89.7% for Jewish patients (P = 0.014). Patients who did not express CD45 antigen showed superior survival (P = 0.028). Five (13.5%) patients relapsed, four of whom died of their disease. Death as a consequence of therapy toxicity was documented in one patient while on the re-induction protocol (protocol IIA).

Conclusions: Our study shows that OS and EFS for all patients was 86.5% and 83.8%, respectively.






[1] NHL = non-Hodgkin lymphoma



[2] BFM = Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster


October 2010
R.O. Escarcega, J. Carlos Perez-Alva, M. Jimenez-Hernandez, C. Mendoza-Pinto, R. Sanchez Perez, R. Sanchez Porras and M. Garcia-Carrasco

Background: On-site cardiac surgery is not widely available in developing countries despite a high prevalence of coronary artery disease.

Objectives: To analyze the safety, feasibility and cost-effectiveness of transradial percutaneous coronary intervention without on-site cardiac surgery in a community hospital in a developing country.

Methods: Of the 174 patients who underwent PCI[1] for the first time in our center, we analyzed two groups: stable coronary disease and acute myocardial infarction. The primary endpoint was the rate of complications during the first 24 hours after PCI. We also analyzed the length of hospital stay and the rate of hospital readmission in the first week after PCI, and compared costs between the radial and femoral approaches.

Results: The study group comprised 131 patients with stable coronary disease and 43 with acute MI[2]. Among the patients with stable coronary disease 8 (6.1%) had pulse loss, 12 (9.16%) had on-site hematoma, and 3 (2.29%) had bleeding at the site of the puncture. Among the patients with acute MI, 3 (6.98) had pulse loss and 5 (11.63%) had bleeding at the site of the puncture. There were no cases of atriovenous fistula or nerve damage. In the stable coronary disease group, 130 patients (99%) were discharged on the same day (2.4 ± 2 hours). In the acute MI group, the length of stay was 6.6 ± 2.5 days with at least 24 hours in the intensive care unit. There were no hospital readmissions in the first week after the procedure. The total cost, which includes equipment related to the specific approach and recovery room stay, was significantly lower with the radial approach compared to the femoral approach (US$ 500 saving per intervention).

Conclusions: The transradial approach was safe and feasible in a community hospital in a developing country without on-site cardiac surgery backup. The radial artery approach is clearly more cost effective than the femoral approach.






[1] PCI = percutaneous coronary intervention



[2] MI = myocardial infarction


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