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עמוד בית
Tue, 23.07.24

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January 2014
Johad F. Khoury, Myriam Weyl Ben-Arush, Michael Weintraub, Elisha Waldman, Boris Futerman, Eugene Vlodavsky and Sergey Postovsky
 Background: In osteosarcoma the histological response, measured by the percentage of tumor necrosis, constitutes one of the most significant predictive factors, with better survival in patients whose tumor necrosis is ≥ 90%.

Objectives: To determine if the decrease rate of serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP) levels during the first month of neoadjuvant chemotherapy could serve as a predictive indicator of tumor necrosis and clinical outcome.

Methods: We analyzed the medical files of 53 osteosarcoma patients (19 females, 34 males) (median age 16 years, range 8–24); the disease was metastatic in 12 and localized in the other 41.

Results: The histological responses were good in 38 patients (71.7%) and poor in 15 (28.3%). At a median follow-up of 50 months, 34 patients (64.2%) had no evidence of disease and 19 (35.8%) had died from the disease. High levels of SAP at diagnosis correlated with worse survival (P = 0.002). There was no difference in overall survival between patients whose SAP decrease rate was > 25% and those with a rate < 25% (P = 0.14). Among female patients, "rapid" SAP responders had better survival than "slow" responders (P = 0.026). In patients with metastases the SAP decrease rate was positively correlated with survival (P = 0.042).

Conclusions: There was no evidence that "rapid" SAP responders had a higher percentage of tumor necrosis than "slow" responders, although female "rapid" SAP responders had a better prognosis than "slow" responders. Patients with metastases at presentation and "rapid" SAP response had better prognoses.

November 2008
Ophir Lavon, MD, Yael Lurie, MD, Benjamin Abbou, MD, Bishara Bishara, MD, Shlomo Hanan Israelit, MD PhD and Yedidia Bentur, MD.
April 2001
Arie Regev, MD, Rafit Drori, MD, Gerald M. Fraser, MD and Yaron Niv, MD

Background: Alkaline tide is the transient increase in blood and urine pH following stimulation of gastric acid secretion. It is attributed to HC03 release from parietal cells in parallel with H+ secretion. The enzyme carbonic anhydrase is thought to be responsible for HC03 production from CO2 and 0H in the parietal cell.

Objective: To examine the effect of pretreatment with the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide, on the alkaline tide phenomenon.

Methods: Ten patients with dyspepsia and demonstrable alkaline tide were tested on three separate days. The pH and base excess were determined in arterialized venous blood before and 45 minutes after an intramuscular injection of pentagastrin. The pH of the urine was measured before and 120 mm after pentagastrin injection. Measurements were performed after pentagastrin alone on day 1 following pretreatment with acetazolamide 60 mm before pentagastrin on day 2, and after the administration of acetazolamide alone on day 3.

Results: Following the administration of pentagastrin alone, the blood base excess increased by 1.61 +0.2 mEq/L (mean + standard deviation) and the calculated alkaline tide at 45 mm was 33.99 ±4.49 mEq. On day 2 with prior adminis­tration of acetazolamide, base excess decreased by 0.21 + 0.39 mEq/L, and the calculated alkaline tide was -3.28±7.57 mEq, which was significantly lower than on day 1 (P=0 0001). On day 3, following acetazolamide alone, the base excess values decreased by 0.53~0.2 mEq/L and the alkaline tide was -10.05 +3.33 mEq there was no significant difference compared with day 2 (P= 0.44).

Conclusion: Pretreatment with acetazolamide abolished the alkaline tide induced by pentagastrin. This finding supports the view that carbonic anhydrase has a major role in the alkaline tide phenomenon.

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