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עמוד בית
Sun, 23.06.24

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May 2013
S. Billan, O. Kaidar-Person, F. Atrash, I. Doweck, N. Haim, A. Kuten and O. Ronen
 Background: The role of induction chemotherapy in advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is under constant debate. Surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapies are part of the treatment strategy in these patients, but their sequence remains to be defined.

Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of induction chemotherapy with docetaxel-cisplatin-5-flurouracil (TPF) followed by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with concomitant chemotherapy (CRT) or cetuximab (ERT) in the treatment of patients with advanced SCCHN.

Methods: We reviewed the data of all patients with advanced SCCHN, stage III and IV, treated in 2007–2010. Tolerability was assessed and scored according to the proportion of patients completing the planned study protocol. Toxicity was scored using the U.S. National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (version 4) for classification of adverse events.

Results: The study included 53 patients. TPF was initiated at a reduced dose in 13 patients (25%). Twenty-two patients (41.5%) received primary prophylaxis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) and 42 (77%) completed treatment according to schedule. During the induction phase one patient (2%) died and 24 (45%) had one or more grade 3-4 complications. The number of patients who developed neutropenia was lower in the group that received primary GCSF prophylaxis. Secondary dose reductions were required in 21% of the patients.

Conclusions: Induction TPF was associated with grade 3-4 toxicity. Prophylaxis with GCSF should be part of the treatment regimen.

 

January 2013
M. Weyl Ben-Arush, A. Ben Barak, R. Bar-Deroma, S. Ash, G. Goldstein, H. Golan, H. Houri, D. Waldman, N. Nevo, R. Bar Shalom, A. Berniger, A. Nevelsky, A. Toren, I. Yaniv and A. Kuten
 Background: Palliative treatment of refractory neuroblastoma remains a significant clinical problem.

Objectives: To retrospectively determine the clinical response to 131I-MIBG therapy at low doses in patients with refractory neuroblastoma.

Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of 10 patients with neuroblastoma treated with 131I-MIBG at Rambam Health Care Campus from 1994 to 2012. Clinical data, number of 131I-MIBG courses delivered, toxicities, and clinical responses were reviewed. MIBG scan was performed after each course.

Results: Twenty-one courses of 131I-MIBG were delivered to 10 patients (3 girls, 7 boys). Their mean age was 3.8 years (range 1.5–6 years). All patients received several protocols of chemotherapy including the high dose form. Three patients received three courses of 131I-MIBG with a minimum of 6 weeks between each course, five patients received two courses, and two patients received only one course. An objective response to the first course was obtained in nine patients and to the second course in six of eight, and in three children who underwent the third course the pain decreased. One patient has no evidence of disease, four are alive with disease, and five died of the disease. No unanticipated toxicities were observed.

Conclusions: Low dose 131I-MIBG is an effective and relatively non-toxic treatment in neuroblastoma disease palliation. Rapid and reproducible pain relief with 131I-MIBG was obtained in most of the children. Treatment with systemic radiotherapy in the form of low dose 131I-MIBG was easy to perform and effective in cases of disseminated neuroblastoma, demonstrating that this primary therapy can be used for palliative purposes.

September 2012
D. Hershko, R. Abdah-Bortnyak, A. Nevelsky, E. Gez, ,G. Fried, and A. Kuten

Background: Local recurrences after breast-conserving surgery occur mostly at the site of the primary carcinoma. The main objective of postoperative radiotherapy is sterilization of residual cancer cells. Whole-breast radiotherapy is the standard of care, but its utility has recently been challenged in favor of radiotherapy limited to the area at highest risk of recurrence. Intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOeRT) is an innovative technique for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) that is applied to selected patients affected by early breast cancer.

Objectives:  To describe our experience with IOeRT at the Rambam Health Care Campus in Haifa since we began utilizing this modality in 2006.

Methods: From April 2006 to September 2010, 31 patients affected by unifocal invasive duct breast carcinoma ≤ 2 cm diameter received wide local resection followed by intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons. Patients were evaluated for early and late complications, and other events, 1 month after surgery and every 3 months thereafter for the duration of the first 2 years.

Results: After a mean follow-up of 36 months, seven patients developed mild breast fibrosis and three suffered from mild postoperative infection. Rib fractures were observed in four patients before routine lead shielding was initiated. Additional whole-breast irradiation was given to four patients. None of the patients developed local recurrences or other ipsilateral cancers. Similarly, no contralateral cancers or distant metastases were observed.

Conclusions: Intraoperative electron radiotherapy may be an alternative to external beam radiation therapy in an appropriate selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients. However, long-term results of clinical trials are required to better evaluate the indications and utility of this technique in the management of breast cancer.
 

April 2011
S. Billan, R. Abdah-Bortnyak, H. Cohen, R. Bar-Shalom, J. Guilburd, M. Kraus, A. Kuten and M. Weyl Ben Arush
April 2009
August 2003
E. Rosenblatt, N. Meushar, R. Bar-Deroma, K. Drumea, M. Stein, J. Zidan and A. Kuten

Background: There are radiobiologic and technical advantages to the use of interstitial brachytherapy alone or as an adjunct to external beam radiotherapy in the postoperative treatment of soft tissue sarcomas.

Objectives: To review the experience of the Rambam Medical Center in implementing interstitial brachytherapy in the treatment of 32 patients with soft tissue sarcomas.

Methods: Thirty-two patients with variously located soft tissue sarcomas were managed with a combination of surgery and brachytherapy of the tumor bed, with or without EBRT[1]. In 27 of 32 patients, brachytherapy catheters were placed intraoperatively, while in 5 patients the implant was performed as a separate postoperative procedure. Twenty-seven patients received low dose-rate brachytherapy with iridium-192 seeds. Five patients received fractionated high dose-rate brachytherapy using the microSelectron machine.

Results: With a median follow-up of 36 months, the overall local control rate was 87.5%. Four of 32 patients (13%) failed locally at the implant site, and 6 (19%) developed lung metastasis. Two of the five patients with lung metastasis had a local recurrence as well. At the time of analysis, eight patients had died of sarcoma (disease-specific mortality rate was 25%), while three had died of intercurrent causes. The 5 year actuarial disease-free survival rate was 56%, and the 5 year actuarial overall survival was 70%. Five patients (16%) developed severe wound complications following surgery/brachytherapy, and six patients (19%) developed late local toxicity (fibrosis and telangiectasia).

Conclusions: Wide local excision followed by interstitial brachytherapy has resulted in an 87.5% local control rate with a 17% local complication rate.

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[1] EBRT = external beam radiotherapy


October 1999
Edward Rosenblatt MD, Jamal Zidan MD, Ofer Ben-Izhak MD and Abraham kuten MD
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