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עמוד בית
Tue, 23.07.24

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May 2024
Waseem Abboud DMD MD, Dror Shamir DMD MSc, Rania Elkhatib MD, Heli Rushinek DMD, Yoli Bitterman DMD MSc, Mati Cohen Sela DMD, Adir Cohen DMD MSc

Background: Condylar hyperplasia is a non-neoplastic overgrowth of the mandibular condyle. The disorder is progressive and causes gradual jaw deviation, facial asymmetry, and dental malocclusion. The only treatment capable of stopping hyperplastic growth is surgical condylectomy to remove the upper portion of the condyle containing the deranged growth center. When this procedure is conducted in proportion to the length of the healthy side it may also correct the jaw deviation and facial asymmetry.

Objectives: To assess the degree to which condylectomy corrects the asymmetry and to determine the proportion of patients after condylectomy who were satisfied with the esthetic result and did not desire further corrective surgery.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of patients who underwent condylectomy that was not followed by corrective orthognathic surgery for at least 1 year to determine the degree of correction of chin deviation and lip cant. Patient satisfaction from treatment or desire and undergo further corrective surgery was reported.

Results: Chin deviation decreased after condylectomy from a mean of 4.8⁰ to a mean of 1.8⁰ (P < 0.001). Lip cant decreased after condylectomy from a mean of 3.5⁰ to a mean of 1.5⁰ (P < 0.001). Most patients (72%) were satisfied with the results and did not consider further corrective orthognathic surgery.

Conclusions: Proportional condylectomy could be a viable treatment to both arrest the condylar overgrowth and achieve some correction of the facial asymmetry.

January 2024
Bassam Abboud MD, Ron Dar MD, Zakhar Bramnick MD, Moaad Farraj MD

Gastric perforation secondary to foreign body ingestion is rare. While obvious signs of acute abdomen usually lead to a prompt diagnosis by emergency department (ED) staff, this can be delayed in non-responsive or mentally disabled patients. An altered pain perception has been described in schizophrenia, as part of a complex phenomenon, which is thought to be unrelated to changes in nociceptive pathways. Cognitive impairment and negative symptoms may strongly influence the patient’s expression of pain [1].

February 2019
Waseem A. Abboud DMD, Sahar Nadel DMD, Sharon Hassin-Baer MD, Abigail Arad MD, Alex Dobriyan DMD and Ran Yahalom DMD

Background: Drooling is the unintentional loss of saliva from the mouth, usually caused by poor coordination of the swallowing mechanism. It is commonly seen in patients with chronic neurologic disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), cerebral palsy, and stroke, as well as in patients with cognitive impairment and dementia.

Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injections into the parotid and submandibular salivary glands for the treatment of drooling.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of the medical records of 12 consecutive patients treated with botulinum toxin injections into the parotid and submandibular glands for the first time. The primary outcome variable was the subjective improvement of drooling on a 5-point scale. Secondary outcome variables were duration of the therapeutic effect, request to undergo additional treatment, and adverse events.

Results: Of 12 patients, 8 (67%) reported considerable improvement after treatment, 3 reported slight improvement, and 1 reported development of dry mouth. All patients stated that they felt the effects 1 week after the injections; the mean duration of the therapeutic effect was 4.5 months (range 3–9 months). One patient suffered from local hematoma and ecchymosis that did not require medical care. Another patient complained of difficulty swallowing, which did not require medical treatment and resolved spontaneously within 1 month.

Conclusions: Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injections into the parotid and submandibular glands seem to be a safe and effective therapy for the treatment of drooling. Further long-term prospective studies with varying doses are warranted.

July 2016
Waseem Abboud DMD, Sahar Nadel DMD, Noam Yarom DMD and Ran Yahalom DMD

Background: Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders affect roughly 5% of the population. Chronic closed lock is one of the more common temporomandibular disorders and is characterized by limited mouth opening and various degrees of joint pain and dysfunction. 

Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of arthroscopic lysis and lavage of the TMJ to treat limited mouth opening in patients suffering from chronic closed lock. 

Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of the medical records of 47 patients with chronic closed lock treated with arthroscopic lysis and lavage. Patients were diagnosed preoperatively with closed lock of the TMJ and were unresponsive to previous conservative therapy. Three outcome variables were used to assess the efficacy of treatment: maximal mouth opening, subjective evaluation of overall improvement by the patient (on a 3 grade scale: “excellent,” “fair,” and “poor”), and length of hospital stay. In addition, complications were reported. 

Results: The maximal mouth opening values increased from a mean of 27 ± 4.7 mm preoperatively to a mean of 38 mm ± 5.4 mm postoperatively. The subjective evaluation of overall improvement was “excellent” in 15 patients (32%), “fair” in 21 (45%), and “poor” in 11 (23%). Success was defined as a maximal mouth opening of 35 mm or more after arthroscopy, and not reporting a “poor” result in the subjective evaluation. This was achieved in 36 patients, yielding a success rate of 77%. The mean length of hospital stay was less than one day (0.78 days). The complication rate was low (8%) and all complications resolved within 2 weeks. 

Conclusion: Arthroscopic lysis and lavage is a simple, safe, and efficient minimally invasive intervention for the treatment of chronic closed lock of the TMJ. 

 

November 2008
Ophir Lavon, MD, Yael Lurie, MD, Benjamin Abbou, MD, Bishara Bishara, MD, Shlomo Hanan Israelit, MD PhD and Yedidia Bentur, MD.
February 2007
December 1999
Eduard Kaykov MD, Benyamine Abbou MD, Scott Friedstrom MD, Doron Hermoni MD and Nathan Roguin MD
 Background: Previous work has suggested an association between Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and coronary artery disease. The infection was demonstrated by titers of antibodies - enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or immunofluorescence, and polymerase chain reaction - and by the findings of C. pneumoniae in the atherosclerotic plaque.

Objectives: To evaluate the association between chronic infection with C. pneumoniae, as measured by a high titer of IgG antibody, and CAD. Our study was designed to explore the relationship between seropositivity to C. pneumoniae and serious coronary events, and to assess whether or not there may be an additional association between established cardiovascular factors and infection with this organism.

Methods: The serum of 130 patients with proven CAD was tested for the presence of IgG antibodies to C. pneumoniae using an ELISA test. A titer ≤1:64 using the microinfluorescence method, the recognized "gold standard," correlates with a positive result when using the ELISA method. The mean age was 57 (40-65 years). The patients, 82% male and 18% female, had either myocardial infarction (n=109) or unstable angina (n=21) 6 months before the investigation (range 3-24 months). The serum for the control group was obtained from 98 blood donors from the same area matched for age 52 (40-58 years) and sex. The donors had no known cardiac history.

Results: In the CAD group 75% of patients were positive for C. pneumoniae compared to 33% in the control group (P=0.001). No increased correlation could be demonstrated between traditional risk factors and C. pneumoniae infection, except in those patients with diabetes mellitus. We found a lower prevalence of IgG antibody to C. pneumoniae in the diabetes subgroup than in other subgroups (P<0.006), but a higher prevalence than in the control group.

Conclusions: We demonstrated a more than twofold increase in seropositivity to C. pneumoniae among patients suffering serious coronary events, and this trend was independent of gender, age or ethnic group. These findings suggest that chronic C. pneumoniae infection may be a significant risk factor for the development of CAD, but this correlation should be investigated further.

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CAD= coronary artery disease

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