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עמוד בית
Sat, 22.06.24

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August 2019
Khalil Salame MD, Alon Grundshtein MD, Gilad Regev MD, Morsi Khashan MD, Ran Lador MD and Zvi Lidar MD

Spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) is commonly used as an effective therapeutic modality for a range of cervical symptoms. However, in rare cases, cervical manipulation may be associated with complications. In this review we present a series of cases with cervical spine injury and myelopathy following therapeutic manipulation of the neck, and examine their clinical course and neurological outcome. We conducted a search for patients who developed neurological symptoms due to cervical spinal cord injury following neck SMT in the database of a spinal unit in a tertiary hospital between the years 2008 and 2018. Patients were assessed for the clinical course and deterioration, type of manipulation used and subsequent management. A total of four patients were identified, two men and two women, aged 32–66 years. In three patients neurological deterioration appeared after chiropractic adjustment and in one patient after tuina therapy. Three patients were managed with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion while one patient declined surgical treatment. Assessment for subjective and objective evidence of cervical myelopathy should be performed prior to cervical manipulation, and suspected myelopathic patients should be sent for further workup by a specialist familiar with cervical myelopathy (such as a neurologist, a neurosurgeon or orthopedic surgeon who specializes in spinal surgery). Nevertheless, manipulation therapy remains an important and generally safe treatment modality for a variety of cervical complaints. This review does not intend to discard the role of SMT as a significant part in the management of patients with neck related symptoms, rather it is meant to draw attention to the need for careful clinical and imaging investigation before treatment.

January 2015
Khalil Salame MD, Gilad Regev MD, Ory Keynan MD and Zvi Lidar MD

Background: Most spine tumors are resistant to radiation and chemotherapy. Complete surgical removal provides the best chance for long-term control of the tumor. Total en bloc spondylectomy (TES) is a radical new technique that entails total removal of the tumor and affected vertebras with clean margins.

Objectives: To review our initial experience with TES, focusing on feasibility, surgical challenges and the short-term outcome.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the hospitalization charts and follow-up data of all patients treated with TES for spine tumors in the spine unit at Tel Aviv Medical Center.

Results: TES was performed in 12 patients aged 13–78 years. Nine patients had primary spinal tumors and three had metastasis. Total en bloc removal was achieved in all cases with spondylectomy of one to three affected vertebras. There was no perioperative mortality and only one major intraoperative complication of injury to a major blood vessel. Late complications were mainly related to hardware failure.

Conclusions: Total en bloc spondylectomy is feasible and effective for the management of selected patients with extradural spinal tumors. Since the surgical procedure is demanding and carries significant risk, careful preoperative evaluation and collaboration with colleagues from other specialties are crucial.

November 2013
I. Strauss, T. Jonas-Kimchi, Z. Lidar MD, D. Buchbut, N. Shtraus, B. W. Corn and A. A. Kanner
 Background: Radiation treatment of spinal and paraspinal tumors has been limited by the tolerance of the spinal cord. As such, therapeutic options are restricted to surgically accessible lesions or the use of suboptimal dosing of external beam irradiation.

Objectives: To evaluate the safety and applicability of the Elekta Synergy-S radiation unit for the treatment of spinal tumors.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery to spinal tumors between November 2007 and June 2011.

Results: Thirty-four patients were treated for 41 lesions. Treatment indications were local tumor control and pain palliation. The mean follow-up was 10.8 ± 11.6 months (range 0.5–38 months). No acute radiation toxicity or new neurological deficits occurred during the follow-up period. Local tumor control was achieved in 21 of the 24 lesions (87.5%) available for radiological follow-up at a median of 9.8 months (range 3–32 months). Good analgesia was achieved in 24/30 lesions (80%) that presented with intractable pain.

Conclusions: The safety and feasibility of delivering single and multiple-fraction stereotactic spinal irradiation was demonstrated and became a standard treatment option in our institution. 

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