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עמוד בית
Tue, 28.05.24

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June 2022
Royi Barnea PhD, Ruti Berger PhD, Yossi Weiss PhD MPH, and Joshua Shemer MD

Overuse of healthcare services is a common phenomenon defined as: “a healthcare service that is provided under circumstances in which its potential for harm exceeds the possible benefit.” It is expressed in the gap between desired services and available ones and is accompanied by high financial and human life costs. One-fifth to one-third of patients receives unnecessary, ineffective, or potentially harmful treatments or services. One of the greatest challenges to understanding overuse is the lack of definition for appropriate use. Apart from the physical and mental damage caused by overuse or improper use of medical services, this phenomenon has many implications, such as increasing waiting times for services, creating long queues, and incurring considerable financial costs as over 10% of hospital expenses are used to correct medical errors or preventable infections. Government intervention through economic arrangements such as deductibles and pre-authorization of services by the insurer are partially effective in reducing the overuse of health services. Additional solutions include ensuring safety and quality of care as well as shared decision-making.

October 2019
Royi Barnea PhD, Lina Voronenko BSc, Lin Zu PhD, Iris Reychav PhD and Yossi Weiss PhD MPH

Background: Surgery is a core activity in hospitals. Operating rooms have some of the most important and vital functions in medical centers. The operating rooms and their staff are a valuable infrastructure resource and their availability and preparedness affect human life and quality of care.

Objectives: To prepare operational suggestions for improving operating room utilization by mapping current working processes in the operating rooms of a large private medical center.

Methods: Data on 23,585 surgeries performed at our medical center between August 2016 and March 2017 were analyzed by various parameters including utilization, capacity, working hours, and surgery delays.

Results: Average operating room utilization was 79%, while 21% was considered lost operating room time. The two major factors that influenced the lost operating room time were the time intervals between planned usage blocks and the partial utilization of operating room time. We calculated that each percent of utilized operating room time translates into 440 surgeries annually, resulting in a potential annual increase in income.

Conclusions: Increasing operating room utilization would result in an improvement of operating room availability and an increased number of procedures. Our analysis shows that operating room utilization in the private healthcare system is efficient compared to the public healthcare system in Israel. Therefore the private healthcare system should be treated as a contributing factor to help lower surgery waiting times and release bottlenecks, rather than being perceived as contributing to inequality.

June 2017
Sergio Susmallian MD, David Goitein MD, Royi Barnea PhD and Asnat Raziel MD

Background: Leakage from the staple line is the most serious complication encountered after sleeve gastrectomy, occurring in 2.4% of surgeries. The use of inappropriately sized staplers, because of variability in stomach wall thickness, is a major cause of leakage.

Objectives: To measure stomach wall thickness across different stomach zones to identify variables correlating with thickness.

Methods: The study comprised 100 patients (52 females). Stomach wall thickness was measured immediately after surgery using a digital caliper at the antrum, body, and fundus. Results were correlated with body mass index (BMI), age, gender, and pre-surgical diagnosis of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and fatty liver.

Results: Stomach thickness was found to be 5.1 ± 0.6 mm at the antrum, 4.1 ± 0.6 mm at the body, and 2. 6 ± 0.5 mm at the fundus. No correlation was found between stomach wall thickness and BMI, gender, or co-morbidities. 

Conclusions: Stomach wall thickness increases gradually from the fundus toward the antrum. Application of the correct staple height during sleeve gastrectomy is important and may, theoretically, prevent leaks. Staplers should be chosen according to the thickness of the tissue.

 

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