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עמוד בית
Sat, 02.03.24

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June 2017
Yael C. Cohen MD, Tamar Berger MD MHA, Lora Eshel MD, Dorit Stern MD, Osnat Bairey MD, Pia Raanani MD and Ofer Shpilberg MD MPH

Background: Pulmonary infiltrates (PIs) detected in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) may present a diagnostic challenge due to their wide differential diagnosis, including infection, pulmonary lymphoma and immunochemotherapy-associated pulmonary toxicity.

Objectives: To characterize therapy-associated PIs by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging.

Methods: We conducted a historical analysis of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT (18F-FDG-PET/CT) PIs in NHL patients treated with combined immunochemotherapy including rituximab. Incidence of PIs, radiological features, patients’ characteristics, underlying NHL type, rituximab/chemotherapy dosing schedules, and symptoms were recorded. Therapy-associated PIs were defined as new or worsening PIs appearing after treatment onset, without evidence of active pulmonary lymphoma or infection.

Results: Among 80 patients who met the pre-specified criteria, therapy-associated PIs were identified in 17 (21%), 6 of whom had accompanying symptoms. Increased FDG uptake was observed in nine, and PI resolution in six. The incidence of PIs was higher in females and in patients with aggressive lymphoma, at advanced stages, and in those who had received treatment consisting of a combination of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone every 14 days (R-CHOP-14).

Conclusions: This characterization of therapy-associated PIs may support the clinician managing NHL patients. Further prospective studies are needed to establish the role of each therapeutic component and the natural history of this phenomenon.

March 2009
R. Ram, A. Gafter-Gvili, P. Raanani, M. Yeshurun, O. Shpilberg, J. Dreyer, A. Peck, L. Leibovici and M. Paul

Background: Monitoring the rate of infections in individual centers that treat patients with hematological malignancies is of major importance. However, there are no uniform guidelines for infection surveillance.

Objectives: To describe the epidemiology of bacterial and fungal infections in a single hematology ward and to compare methods for reporting surveillance and infection rates in other centers in Israel.

Methods: We conducted a prospective surveillance of all patients admitted to our hematology ward, applying standard definitions for invasive fungal infections and adapting definitions for non-fungal infections. Incidence rates were calculated using patients, admissions, hospital days and neutropenia days. We performed a search for other reported surveillance studies in Israel.

Results: We detected 79 infectious episodes among 159 patients admitted to the hematology ward during 1 year. Using neutropenia days as the denominator for calculation of incidence discriminated best between patients at high and low risk for infection. The incidence of invasive fungal infections was 7, 10 and 18 per 1000 neutropenia days, among all patients, those with acute leukemia and those with acute leukemia undergoing induction therapy, respectively. Only 10 reports from Israel were identified, 6 of which were prospective. Our data could not be compared to these reports because of the varying definitions and denominators used.

Conclusions: Hematology centers should monitor infection rates and report them in a uniform methodology.
 

January 2009
A. Dortort Lazar, O. Shpilberg, M. Shaklai and O. Bairey

Background: There is currently no standard salvage chemotherapy for the 40–50% of patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma who fail first-line treatment.

Objectives: To review the experience of a major tertiary medical center with DVIP (dexamethasone, etoposide, ifosfamide and cisplatin) salvage therapy for primary refractory/relapsing NHL[1].

Methods: We reviewed the records of all patients with NHL who received DVIP salvage therapy during the period 1993 to 2005.

Results: We identified 37 adult patients (mean age 56.3 years): 29 with aggressive lymphoma and 8 with indolent lymphoma. Mean event-free survival was 13.5 months (range 0–82 months), mean time between diagnosis and DVIP treatment 18.5 months (range 2–101), and mean number of DVIP cycles 1.9. Four patients (11%) achieved a complete response and 9 (24%) a partial response (overall response 35%). Consolidation with stem cell transplantation was used in 14 patients with aggressive lymphoma and 4 with indolent lymphoma; 14 patients, all with aggressive lymphoma, responded (12 complete, 2 partial). Of the 10 patients who underwent SCT[2] despite no response to salvage DVIP, 6 achieved a complete response. Five year overall survival from diagnosis for the whole sample was 39.4 ± 8.7%, and 5 year post-DVIP overall survival 37.6 ± 8.0%. On multivariate analysis, SCT was the strongest predictor of survival (relative risk 0.73, P < 0.0001) followed by a high score on the International Prognostic Index (RR[3] 3.71, P = 0.032).

Conclusions: DVIP salvage therapy for NHL was associated with a low response rate of 35% but a 5 year post-DVIP survival rate of 37.6%. Patients who are refractory to salvage treatment with DVIP might still be salvaged with SCT.






[1] NHL = non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma



[2] SCT = stem cell transplantation



[3] RR = relative risk



 
December 2006
O. Bairey, R. Ruchlemer and O. Shpilberg

Background: Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the colon is a rare and consequently poorly studied extranodal lymphoma. Most of the previous publications used old pathologic classifications and old diagnostic and treatment approaches.

Objective: To examine the clinical presentation, pathologic classification, treatment and outcome of patients with NHL[1] of the colon.


Methods: A retrospective study was performed of all patients with NHL and involvement of the colon in two medical centers. The patient group consisted of 17 patients over a 13 year period.


Results: Fourteen patients had primary involvement and 3 secondary. The ileocecal region and cecum were the most frequent sites of involvement, occurring in 76% of patients. Most patients had bulky disease: three had a diameter > 5 cm and eight a diameter > 10 cm. Aggressive histology was found in 12 patients: diffuse large B cell lymphoma in 11 and peripheral T cell lymphoma in 1. Three patients had mantle cell lymphoma and two had indolent lymphomas: mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (n=1) and small lymphocytic (n=1). Eleven patients underwent hemicolectomy: right sided in 9 and left sided in 2, and 5 DLBCL[2] patients required emergency surgery for intestinal perforation. The median overall survival was 44 months (range 1–147). Disease stage influenced prognosis; six of seven patients with limited-stage DLBCL who received aggressive chemotherapy achieved complete remission and enjoyed prolonged survival, whereas patients with aggressive disseminated disease had resistant disease and poor survival (median 8 months).


Conclusions: Most colonic lymphomas are aggressive B cell lymphomas. Diagnosis is often delayed. Early diagnosis may prevent perforation. Those with limited-stage disease when treated with aggressive chemotherapy may enjoy prolonged survival. 

The role of elective hemicolectomy to prevent perforation should be examined in prospective trials.




[1] NHL = non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

[2] DLBCL = diffuse large B cell lymphoma  

August 2003
M. Huerta, H. Castel, I. Grotto, O. Shpilberg, M. Alkan and I. Harman-Boehm

Background: We treated two patients diagnosed with legionellosis and simultaneous Rickettsia conorii co-infection.

Objectives: To report the clinical and laboratory characteristics of this unusual combination, and to describe the execution and results of our environmental and epidemiologic investigations.

Methods: Serial serologic testing was conducted 1, 4 and 7 weeks after initial presentation. Water samples from the patients’ residence were cultured for Legionella. Follow-up cultures were taken from identical points at 2 weeks and at 3 months after the initial survey.

Results: Both patients initially expressed a non-specific rise in anti-Legionella immunoglobulin M titers to multiple serotypes. By week 4 a definite pattern of specifically elevated IgG[1] titers became apparent, with patient 1 demonstrating a rise in specific anti-L. pneumophila 12 IgG titer, and patient 2 an identical response to L. jordanis. At 4 weeks both patients were positive for both IgM and IgG anti-R. conorii antibodies at a titer ³ 1:100. Heavy growth of Legionella was found in water sampled from the shower heads in the rooms of both patients. Indirect immunofluorescence of water cultures was positive for L. pneumophila 12 and for L. jordanis.

Conclusions: Although most cases of community-acquired Legionella pneumonia in our region appear simultaneously with at least one other causative agent, co-infection with R. conorii is unusual and has not been reported to date. This report illustrates the importance of cooperation between clinicians and public health practitioners.






[1] Ig = immunoglobulin


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