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עמוד בית
Mon, 17.06.24

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December 2010
E. Horowitz, I. Abadi-Korek, M. Shani and J. Shemer

Background: The European Quality of Life 5-Dimensions questionnaire is one of the most commonly used measures of health-related quality of life.

Objectives: To present the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the Hebrew version of the EQ-5D[1].

Methods: We conducted face-to-face interviews with a representative sample (n=1666) of the Israeli Jewish population. The data collected included demographic and medical information, and self-valuation of health using the EQ-5D descriptive system, Visual Analogue Scale and Time Trade-Off. Construct validity was assessed by assuming that older individuals, those with a greater burden of diseases, and those reporting experience with their own severe illness would have lower EQ-5D indexes, VAS[2] and TTO[3] values. Test-retest reliability was assessed in a small sample (n=50) that was reevaluated after a 3 week interval.

Results: Test-retest reliability of the EQ-5D and VAS was very high (r ≥ 0.85). Reliability of the TTO was moderate (r = 0.48). There were significant differences in the EQ-5D index, profiles, VAS and TTO between healthy and sick respondents and younger and older respondents, indicating good validity of the instrument.

Conclusions: The Hebrew translation of the EQ-5D is a practical, reliable and valid instrument for assessing the health-related quality of life of the general Israeli Jewish population.






[1] EQ-5D = European Quality of Life 5-Dimensions

[2] VAS = Visual Analogue Scale

[3] TTO = Time Trade-Off


December 2008
Click here for article written by Orly Tamir, MHA, MSc, Joshua Shemer, MD, Mordechai Shani, MD, Sharona Vaknin, MSc and Miriam Ines Siebzehner, PhD, MPA, RN. IMAJ 2008: 12: December: 901-905
The Israeli Center for Technology Assessment in Health Care (ICTAHC) was established in 1998 at the Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, on foundations set in 1992 by the Medical Technology Assessment Unit. The Center is defined as an independent multidisciplinary research center, whose main aims are to assist in developing processes for the adoption of new technologies, identify and propose health priorities, and serve as an educational center for all stakeholders. Moreover, the Center promotes working relations with overseas counterparts as an essential component for expansion and advancement of the field of health technology assessment. Throughout the years, ICTAHC had contributed significantly to the development of the discipline of health technology assessment in Israel and to actual decision making in the health care system. The Center had outlined the principles, guidelines and overall framework for technology assessment in the country, as well as substantiating the discipline through various research areas, which materialized into a variety of technology-related policy accomplishments. Today, the Center serves as a national focal point in the health care system in Israel, as well as maintaining an active position in the international milieu. It has been a decade since the establishment of ICTAHC. This paper reviews the evolution of the center, describes changes in the HTA[1] field in Israel, identifies areas of focus and main research accomplishments, and illustrates the breadth of potential research scope and projections for the future.





[1] HTA = health technology assessment

May 2008
R. Magnezi, S. Reicher and Mordechai Shani

Chronic disease management has been a rapidly growing entity in the 21st century as a strategy for managing chronic illnesses in large populations. However, experience has shown that disease management programs have not been able to demonstrate their financial value. The objectives of disease management programs are to create quality benchmarks, such as principles and guidelines, and to establish a uniform set of metrics and a standardized methodology for evaluating them. In order to illuminate the essence of disease management and its components, as well as the complexity and the problematic nature of performing economic calculations of their profitability and value, we collected data from several reports that dealt with the economic intervention of disease management programs. The disease management economic evaluation is composed of a series of steps, including the following major categories: Data/information technology, information generation, assessment/recommendations, actionable customer plans, and program assessment/reassessment. We demonstrate the elements necessary for economic analysis. Disease management is one of the most innovative tools in the managed care environment and is still in the process of being defined. Therefore, objectives should include the creation of quality benchmarks, such as principles and guidelines, and the establishment of a uniform set of metrics and a standardized methodology for evaluating them.

 
 

September 2006
O. Tamir, M. Rabinovich and M. Shani

In Israel, updating of the National List of Health Services is performed on a yearly basis in a systematic and structured mechanism for almost a decade. The existence of such a mechanism is vital for keeping medicine up to date, since many innovative and breakthrough medical technologies continuously and frequently evolve. The 2006 update is unique in several aspects, relating both to the mechanism and to the decision-making process. In this article we describe notable issues that arose during the current process: modifications to the update mechanism, the four-phase increase in allocated resources to fund the addition of new medical technologies (including the addition of finances at the expense of the 2007 planned budget), and public funding for high-cost therapies. Finally, we discuss the impact of medical advances on healthcare costs and a suggested constant annual addition to the budget.

December 2005
M. Shani

In the last few decades there has been a tendency towards reinstitutionalization.

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