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עמוד בית
Tue, 18.06.24

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July 2023
Michael Goldenshluger MD, Carmel Margalit BSc, Afek Kodesh MS4, Ephraim Katz MD, David Hazzan MD, Lior Segev MD

Background: Perianal abscesses require immediate incision and drainage (I&D). However, prompt bedside drainage is controversial as it may compromise exposure and thorough anal examination.

Objectives: To examine outcomes of bedside I&D of perianal abscesses in the emergency department (ED) vs. the operating room (OR).

Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients presented to the ED with a perianal abscesses between January 2018 and March 2020. Patients with Crohn’s disease, horseshoe or recurrent abscesses were excluded.

Results: The study comprised 248 patients; 151 (60.89%) underwent I&D in the OR and 97 (39.11%) in the ED. Patients elected to bedside I&D had smaller abscess sizes (P = 0.01), presented with no fever, and had lower rates of inflammatory markers. The interval time from diagnosis to intervention was significantly shorter among the bedside I&D group 2.13 ± 2.34 hours vs. 10.41 ± 8.48 hours (P < 0.001). Of patients who underwent I&D in the OR, 7.3% had synchronous fistulas, whereas none at bedside had (P = 0.007). At median follow-up of 24 months, recurrence rate of abscess and fistula formation in patients treated in the ED were 11.3% and 6.2%, respectively, vs. 19.9% and 15.23% (P = 0.023, 0.006). Fever (OR 5.71, P = 0.005) and abscess size (OR 1.7, P = 0.026) at initial presentation were risk factors for late fistula formation.

Conclusions: Bedside I&D significantly shortens waiting time and does not increase the rates of long-term complications in patients with small primary perianal abscesses.

October 2021
Michael Goldenshluger MD, Hen Chaushu MS, Guy Ron MD, Haya Fogel-Grinvald MHA, Shay Mandler MD, Liron Miller MBA PhD, Nir Horesh MD, Batia Segal RN MA, Uri Rimon MD, and Yoram Klein MD

Background: Extra peritoneal packing (EPP) is a quick and highly effective method to control pelvic hemorrhage.

Objectives: To determine whether EPP can be as safely and efficiently performed in the emergency department (ED) as in the operating room (OR).

Methods: Retrospective study of 29 patients who underwent EPP in the ED or OR in two trauma centers in Israel 2008–2018.

Results: Our study included 29 patients, 13 in the ED-EPP group and 16 in the OR-EPP group. The mean injury severity score (ISS) was 34.9 ± 11.8. Following EPP, hemodynamic stability was successfully achieved in 25 of 29 patients (86.2%). A raise in the mean arterial pressure (MAP) with a median of 25 mmHg (mean 30.0 ± 27.5, P < 0.001) was documented. All patients who did not achieve hemodynamic stability after EPP had multiple sources of bleeding or fatal head injury and eventually succumbed. Patients who underwent EPP in the ED showed higher change in MAP (P = 0.0458). The overall mortality rate was 27.5% (8/29) with no difference between the OR and ED-EPP. No differences were found between ED and OR-EPP in the amount of transfused blood products, surgical site infections, and length of stay in the hospital. However, patients who underwent ED-EPP were more prone to develop deep vein thrombosis (DVT): 50% (5/10) vs. 9% (1/11) in ED and OR-EPP groups respectively (P = 0.038).

Conclusions: EPP is equally effective when performed in the ED or OR with similar surgical site infection rates but higher incidence of DVT

July 2020
Michael Goldenshluger MD, Yaara Gutman MD, Aviad Katz MD, Gal Schtrechman MSc, Gal Westrich MD, Aviram Nissan MD and Lior Segev MD

Background: Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) is a single port access platform used for full thickness local excision of rectal lesions. It is an appealing alternative to a radical resection of rectum that often can cause a significant bowel dysfunction described as low anterior resection syndrome (LARS). LARS is evaluated using a validated score. Functional outcomes of patients undergoing TAMIS has not yet been evaluated using the LARS score.

Objectives: To evaluate long-term bowel function in patients who underwent TAMIS.

Methods: In this case series, all patients who underwent TAMIS in a single tertiary institute between 2011 and 2017 were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated bowel function using the LARS score questionnaire through telephone interviews.

Results: The study consisted of 23 patients, average age of 67 ± 6.98 year; 72% were male. The median follow-up from the time of surgery was 5 years. Six patients (26.08%) had malignant type lesions. The average height of the lesion from the anal verge was 7.4 cm. The average size of the specimen was 4 cm. The total LARS score revealed that 17 patients (73.91%) had no definitive LAR syndrome following the surgery. Four patients (17.39%) fit the description of minor LARS and only two (8.69%) presented with major LARS.

Conclusions: TAMIS provides relatively good long-term functional outcomes in terms of bowel function. Further randomized studies with larger cohorts are still needed to better evaluate the outcomes.

September 2018
Michael Goldenshluger MD, David Goitein MD, Gil Segal MD, Sara Apter MD, Eyal Mor MD and Eyal Klang MD
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