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עמוד בית
Sat, 18.05.24

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January 2024
Mattan Arazi MD, Michael Lemanski MA, Michael Belkin MD, Daphna Landau-Prat MD

Background: Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) causes significant patient morbidity as well as economic burden.

Objectives: To evaluate a novel eyelid warming and a neuro-stimulating device that delivers heat via low-level infrared radiation to the eyelids of patients with MGD.

Methods: In this prospective interventional study, patients with MGD were recruited at a single medical center. The main outcome measures included changes in tear break-up time (TBUT), Schirmer’s test, and Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI), overall satisfaction, and corneal signs of dry eye. Patients were instructed to use the device twice daily for 5 minutes on each eye for a total of 14 days. Follow-up assessments were performed after the 2-week treatment.

Results: A total of 10 patients were included; mean age was 67 ± 16 years; six males (60%). Changes in pre- vs. post-treatment TBUT (5.0–6.11), OSDI (28.1–23.9), and Schirmer score (8.67–7.11) were not statistically significant. Over a course of 243 treatments, 131 (54%) demonstrated improvement in symptoms, 40% found no change, and 6% experienced worsening of symptoms. General satisfaction was observed overall in 80% of the patients. No adverse events were observed.

Conclusions: In this first study of a novel eyelid warming device, overall subjective satisfaction was reported in 80% of patients. Potential advantages of this user-friendly device include its ability to improve MGD and tear film stability, as well as symptomatic relief, while allowing the user to continue with normal daily functioning while undergoing treatment.

February 2007
A. Nemet, M. Belkin, M. Rosner

Background: Decreased lacrimal gland output may cause dry eye syndrome. Using a rat model, we examined the feasibility of transplanting lacrimal gland cells from newborns.

Objectives: To restore lacrimal gland function in eyes with compromised tear production.

Methods: A model of dry eye in adult rats was developed by unilateral surgical removal of the main lacrimal gland. Tear secretion in both eyes was then assessed by masked Schirmer's test. Lacrimal gland tissue from newborn rats was transplanted into the fibrous connective tissue in which the lacrimal gland had been embedded. Masked Schirmer's test was repeated 4, 8 and 12 weeks after transplantation.

Results: Schirmer's test performed in 13 rats 10 days after unilateral lacrimal gland excision revealed significantly less wetting on the side with excised gland compared with the normal side (P < 0.003). The lack of secreting cells on the operated side was verified histologically. The reduction in tear secretion on the operated side remained significant for 8 weeks on average. In the six rats with transplanted lacrimal gland tissue however, there were no differences in tear reduction between the two eyes at 4, 8 or 12 weeks after the operation (P = 0.81, 0.56 and 0.8, respectively).

Conclusions: Transplantation of lacrimal gland tissue from newborn rats effectively restored eye wetting in this new model. Further research is needed to evaluate this new approach for treating lacrimal gland dysfunction. Using this model might also facilitate evaluation of potential clinical treatments for dry eyes.
 

October 2000
Valentin Fulga MD, Ben-Ami Sela PhD and Michael Belkin MA MD

Background: Most corneal damage induced by contact lenses is due to interference with corneal oxygenation.

Objective: To investigate the effect on the rabbit cornea of a rigid gas-permeable contact lens with a newly designed periphery.

Method: We fitted New Zealand white rabbits (n=12) with RGP[1] contact lenses that were identical in all respects except for the design of the periphery. In each animal, one contact lens had an innovative periphery consisting of a microscopic diffractive relief lathed on the back surface; the other contact lens was of a conventional design. The lenses were worn continuously for 7 days. During this experimental period and for 1 additional week we assessed the corneal damage by daily testing lactic dehydrogenase activity in the tears.

Results: On the last day of the experimental week and the first 3 days of the healing period, mean tear LDH[2] activity was significantly lower in the eyes with the new contact lens design than in eyes with the conventional lenses.

Conclusions: The novel periphery design reduces corneal damage resulting from contact lens wear, as reflected by LDH levels in the tears. The new design probably facilitates the flow and exchange of tears under the contact lens, resulting in improved metabolism of the cornea. These findings may also prove applicable to soft contact lenses.






[1] RGP = rigid gas permeable



[2] LDH = lactic dehydrogenase


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