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עמוד בית
Sun, 21.07.24

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October 2017
Sarit Appel MD, Jeffry Goldstein MD, Marina Perelman MD, Tatiana Rabin MD, Damien Urban MBBS MD, Amir Onn MD, Tiberiu R. Shulimzon MD, Ilana Weiss MA, Sivan Lieberman MD, Edith M. Marom MD, Nir Golan MD, David Simansky MD, Alon Ben-Nun MD PhD, Yaacov Richard Lawrence MBBS MRCP, Jair Bar MD PhD and Zvi Symon MD PhD

Background: Neoadjuvant chemo-radiation therapy (CRT) dosages in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were traditionally limited to 45 Gray (Gy).

Objectives: To retrospectively analyze outcomes of patients treated with 60 Gy CRT followed by surgery.

Methods: A retrospective chart review identified patients selected for CRT to 60 Gy followed by surgery between August 2012 and April 2016. Selection for surgery was based on the extent of disease, cardiopulmonary function, and response to treatment. Pathological response after neoadjuvant CRT was scored using the modified tumor regression grading. Local control (LC), disease free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were estimated by the Kaplan–Meier method.

Results: Our cohort included 52 patients: 75% (39/52) were stage IIIA. A radiation dose of 60 Gy (range 50–62Gy) was delivered in 82.7%. Surgeries performed included: lobectomy, chest-wall resection, and pneumonectomy in 67.3%, 13.4%, and 19.2%, respectively. At median follow-up of 22.4 months, the 3 year OS was 74% (95% confidence interval [CI] 52–87%), LC was 84% (95%CI 65–93), and DFS 35% (95%CI 14–59). Grade 4–5 postoperative complications were observed in 17.3% of cases and included chest wall necrosis (5.7%), bronco-pleural fistula (7.7%), and death (3.8%). A major pathologic regression with < 10% residual tumor occurred in 68.7% of patients (36/52) and showed a trend to improved OS (P = 0.1). Pneumonectomy cases had statistically worse OS (P = 0.01).

Conclusions: Major pathologic regression was observed 68.7% with 60 Gy neoadjuvant CRT with a trend to improved survival. Pneumonectomy correlated with worse survival.

January 2017
Sarit Appel MD, Yaacov R. Lawrence MRCP, Jeffery Goldstein MD, Raphael M. Pfeffer MD, Ilana Weiss MA, Tatiana Rabin MD, Shira Felder MD, Maoz Ben-Ayun PhD, Lev Tzvang MSc, Dror Alezra PhD, David Simansky MD, Alon Ben-Nun MD PhD, Jair Bar MD PhD and Zvi Symon MD

Background: Stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) is the application of a very high radiation dose to a small treatment volume. It is the new standard of care in medically inoperable early-stage lung cancer. 

Objectives: To report the outcomes of SABR in stage I lung cancer at Sheba Medical Center since its introduction in 2009.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with stage I lung cancer treated during the period 2009–2015. Survival status was retrieved from the electronic medical records and confirmed with the national registry. Local failure was defined as increased FDG uptake on PETCT scan within a 2 cm radius of the treated region. Toxicity was estimated from medical records and graded according to common toxicity criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) version 4.03. Overall survival and local control were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method.

Results: During the study period 114 patients were treated for 122 stage I lung cancer lesions. Median follow-up time was 27 months (range 8.2–69.5 months), median age was 76 years. Eighty-two percent of the tumors were stage IA (size ≤ 3 cm). Median survival was 46 months; estimated 3 year overall survival was 59% (95%CI 47–69%) and local control was 88% (95%CI 78–94%). Toxicity included chest wall pain in 8.4% of patients, rib fracture in 0.9%, grade 1–2 pneumonitis in 12%, grade 3 in 12% and grade 5 (death) in 0.9%.

Conclusions: SABR has been successfully implemented at Sheba Medical Center for the treatment of stage I lung cancer in inoperable patients. It is associated with excellent local control, minor toxicity and an acceptable overall survival.

 

July 2015
Michael Papiashvili MD, Ehud Deviri MD, Ilan Bar MD and Lior Sasson MD

Background: The efficacy of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy in patients with previous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery is controversial.

Objectives: To investigate whether skeletonized left internal mammary artery (LIMA) mobilization contributes to the development of severe adhesions, which will affect what type of lung surgery (open or closed procedure) will be required in the future.

Methods: Eight patients (mean age 73.9 years) with previous CABG surgery using a LIMA to left anterior descending (LAD) graft underwent left-sided lobectomy for operable non-small cell lung carcinoma. 

Results: The lobectomy by thoracotomy rate was 62.5% (5 patients), generally in patients with tumors in the left upper lobe or in patients post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy, while the video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy rate was 37.5% (3 patients). Mean hospital stay was 8.3 days. There was no mortality or major morbidity, apart from six minor complications in four patients (50%) (air leak, atrial fibrillation, atelectasis, pneumonia). 

Conclusions: Patients with operable non-small cell lung carcinoma following CABG surgery who need left upper lobe resection do not benefit from the video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery technique due to significant adhesions between the LIMA to LAD graft and the lung. The method of preserving a small portion of the lung on the LIMA to LAD graft may help during left upper lobe resections. Adhesions in the left pleural space after LIMA mobilization appear to generally minimally affect left lower lobe video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery.

 

June 2015
Michael Papiashvili MD, Henri Hayat MD, Letizia Schreiber MD and Israel E. Priel MD
August 2012
April 2010
G. Shalom, N. Sion-Vardy, J. Dudnik and S. Ariad
October 2007
M. Vainrib and I. Leibovitch

Background: Multiple primary malignancies are increasingly being detected among cancer patients. Objectives: To investigate the co-occurrence of primary bladder cancer and primary lung cancer, two established smoking-related neoplasms characteristically associated with increased risk of secondary cancers.

Methods: A retrospective search of the patient registry in our institution identified 25 patients (23 men and two women) who were diagnosed with both bladder cancer and lung cancer during the period 1990–2005. Medical records were reviewed and clinical and pathological data were extracted.

Results: In 21 patients (84%) bladder cancer was the first primary tumor and in 4 (16%) the second primary tumor. More than 90% of the patients had a history of smoking. Mean smoking exposure was 62.1 pack years (range 30–120). All bladder cancers were transitional cell carcinomas with the majority being superficial at presentation. Most lung cancers were of the non-small cell type. Second primary lung cancers were significantly more advanced at diagnosis. Overall, mean follow-up was 105.8 months (range 6–288). Seven patients (28%) were alive at the time of evaluation; 68% died of lung cancer, while none died of bladder cancer.

Conclusions: Second primary lung cancer may occur in patients with bladder carcinoma and vice versa. In view of the relatively frequent involvement of the genitourinary tract as a site of multiple primary tumors, urologists may have a key role in the detection of second primary tumors arising in the genitourinary tract, or second primary tumors that occur in patients with primary genitourinary tract malignancies.
 

March 2006
H. Schayek, M. Krupsky, P. Yaron, A. Yellin, D.A. Simansky and E. Friedman

Background: The contribution of the abnormal DNA mismatch repair system to non-small cell lung cancer tumorigenesis is controversial and has not been reported in Jewish Israeli patients. Similarly, the involvement of 3p deletions in NSCLC[1] in the same population has not been assessed.

Objectives: To assess the contribution of the DNA-MMR[2] system to NSCLC pathogenesis by analyzing microsatellite instability, and evaluate loss of heterozygosity at 3p rates in Israeli NSCLC patients.

Methods: Paired DNA from tumorous and non-tumorous tissue was extracted, and genotyping for MSI[3] determination was carried out using the five Bethesda markers and for determining LOH[4] two 3p markers were used. Genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction amplification and size separation on an ABI semiautomatic DNA sequencer, and the allelic patterns of tumorous and non-tumorous tissue were compared.

Results: Forty-four NSCLCs from 35 smokers and 9 non-smokers were analyzed, with 26 of the 44 (59%) at stage I disease. Using five microsatellite markers (D17S250, D5S346, D2S123, BAT-25, BAT-26) (known as Bethesda markers) for MSI determination, 6 of the 44 tumors (13.6%) exhibited MSI in at least one marker. Similarly, genotyping for LOH at chromosome 3p was performed using two markers (D3S4103, D3S1234) located at 3p14.2 l. With D3S4103, 33 of the 44 patients successfully analyzed were homozygous and therefore non-informative with respect to LOH. Using D3S1234, 33 of 36 patients (91.7%) were heterozygous, and 23 of these individuals' tumors (69.7%) displayed LOH. Unexpectedly, 4 of 33 tumors (12.1%) genotyped by D3S4103, and 16 of 36 tumors (44.5%) genotyped by D3S1234 showed a pattern of MSI, even though only one of these tumors showed a similar pattern when genotyped with the five consensus markers. Overall, 23 of 44 tumors (52.3%) demonstrated MSI on at least one marker, and 5 of these 23 tumors (21.7%) had MSI on two or more markers.

Conclusions: MSI using 3p markers and not the Bethesda markers occurs at a high rate and in early stages in Jewish NSCLC patients.






[1] NSCLC = non-small cell lung cancer

[2] DNA-MMR = DNA mismatch repair

[3] MSI = microsatellite instability

[4] LOH = loss of heterozygosity


February 2006
A. Peretz, H. Checkoway, J.D. Kaufman, I. Trajber and Y. Lerman

Evidence that crystalline silica is associated with an increased rate of lung cancer led the International Agency for Research on Cancer to conclude in 1997 that crystalline silica is a known human carcinogen. In Israel too, crystalline silica is considered as such. The decision raised a debate in the scientific arena, and a few scientists have questioned the basis upon which causality was determined. We review the literature regarding the level of evidence of crystalline silica carcinogenicity.

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