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עמוד בית
Sat, 15.06.24

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April 2020
Nir Horesh MD, Yasmin Abu-Ghanem MD, Tomer Erlich MD, Danny Rosin MD, Mordechai Gutman MD FACS, Dorit E. Zilberman MD, Jacob Ramon MD and Zohar A. Dotan MD

Background: Pancreatic injuries during nephrectomy are rare, despite the relatively close anatomic relation between the kidneys and the pancreas. The data regarding the incidence and outcome of pancreatic injuries are scarce.

Objectives: To assess the frequency and the clinical significance of pancreatic injuries during nephrectomy.

Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of all patients who underwent nephrectomy over a period of 30 years (1987–2016) in a large tertiary medical center. Demographic, clinical, and surgical data were collected and analyzed.

Results: A total of 1674 patients underwent nephrectomy during the study period. Of those, 553 (33%) and 294 patients (17.5%) underwent left nephrectomy and radical left nephrectomy, respectively. Among those, four patients (0.2% of the total group, 0.7% of the left nephrectomy group, and 1.36% of the radical left nephrectomy) experienced iatrogenic injuries to the pancreas. None of the injuries were recognized intraoperatively. All patients were treated with drains in an attempt to control the pancreatic leak and one patient required additional surgical interventions. Average length of stay was 65 days (range 15–190 days). Mean follow-up was 23.3 months (range 7.7–115 months).

Conclusions: Pancreatic injuries during nephrectomy are rare and carry a significant risk for postoperative morbidity.

January 2017
Benjamin Spieler BA, Jeffrey Goldstein MD, Yaacov R. Lawrence MD, Akram Saad MD, Raanan Berger MD PhD, Jacob Ramon MD, Zohar Dotan MD, Menachem Laufer MD, Ilana Weiss MA, Lev Tzvang MS, Philip Poortmans MD PhD and Zvi Symon MD

Background: Radiotherapy to the prostate bed is used to eradicate residual microscopic disease following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer. Recommendations are based on historical series. 

Objectives: To determine outcomes and toxicity of contemporary salvage radiation therapy (SRT) to the prostate bed. 

Methods: We reviewed a prospective ethics committee-approved database of 229 patients referred for SRT. Median pre-radiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was 0.5 ng/ml and median follow-up was 50.4 months (range 13.7–128). Treatment was planned and delivered using modern three-dimensional radiation techniques. Mean bioequivalent dose was 71 Gy (range 64–83 Gy). Progression was defined as two consecutive increases in PSA level > 0.2 ng/ml, metastases on follow-up imaging, commencement of anti-androgen treatment for any reason, or death from prostate cancer. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and multivariate analysis was performed using STATA. 

Results: Five year progression-free survival was 68% (95%CI 59.8–74.8%), and stratified by PSA was 87%, 70% and 47% for PSA < 0.3, 0.3–0.7, and > 0.7 ng/ml (P < 0.001). Metastasis-free survival was 92.5%, prostate cancer-specific survival 96.4%, and overall survival 94.9%. Low pre-radiation PSA value was the most important predictor of progression-free survival (HR 2.76, P < 0.001). Daily image guidance was associated with reduced risk of gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity (P < 0.005). 

Conclusions: Contemporary SRT is associated with favorable outcomes. Early initiation of SRT at PSA < 0.3 ng/ml improves progression-free survival. Daily image guidance with online correction is associated with a decreased incidence of late toxicity.

 

April 2015
Dorit E. Zilberman MD, Uri Rimon MD, Roy Morag MD, Harry Z. Winkler MD, Jacob Ramon MD and Yoram Mor MD

Abstract

Background: Iatrogenic ureteral injury may be seen following abdominopelvic surgeries. While ureteral injuries identified during surgery should be immediately and surgically repaired, those that are postoperatively diagnosed may be treated non-surgically by draining the ipsilateral kidney. Data regarding the outcome of this approach are still missing.

Objectives: To evaluate the success rates of non-surgical management of ureteral injuries diagnosed following abdominopelvic surgeries.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the files of all patients treated for iatrogenic ureteral injuries diagnosed following abdominopelvic surgeries. Patients' ipsilateral kidney was percutaneously drained following diagnosis of injury by either nephrostomy tube (NT)/nephro-ureteral stent (NUS) or double-J stent (DJS) inserted retrogradely. The tube was left in place until a pyelogram confirmed healing or a conservative approach was abandoned due to failure.

Results: Twenty-nine patients were identified as having ureteral injury following abdominopelvic surgery. Median time from injury to renal drainage was 9 days, interquartile range (IQR) 4–17 days. Seven cases (24%) had surgical repair. Among the other 22 patients, in 2 oncology patients the conservative approach was maintained although renal drainage failed to resolve the injury. In the remaining 20, median drainage length was 60 days (IQR 43.5–85). Calculated overall success rates following renal drainage was 69% (18/29), and with NS approached 78.5%.

Conclusions: Ureteral injuries diagnosed following abdominopelvic surgeries can be treated conservatively. Ipsilateral renal drainage should be the first line of treatment before surgical repair, and NUS may be the preferred drainage to obtain spontaneous ureteral healing. 

July 2005
A. Nadu, Y. Mor, J. Chen, M. Sofer, J. Golomb and J. Ramon

Background: Data during the last decade show that laparoscopic nephrectomy is becoming an accepted and advantageous minimally invasive alternative to the open procedure.

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy, safety and reproducibility of laparoscopic nephrectomy in a series of 110 consecutive procedures.

Methods: A total of 110 patients underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy in our institution during the last 3 years. Their data were entered into a database and analyzed, including age, gender, indications for surgery, operative time, blood loss, intraoperative complications, conversion rates, and postoperative complications (defined as complications occurring up to 1 month after surgery). Histologic results and outpatient follow-up were also recorded.

Results: Mean age at surgery was 63 years (range 21–89 years). The indications for surgery included solid renal masses in 64 cases, non-functioning kidneys in 35, and collecting system or ureteral tumors in 11; and the procedures performed were radical nephrectomy, simple nephrectomy, or nephroureterectomy, respectively. The mean operative time was 125 minutes (range 70–310 minutes). Intraoperative complications were recorded in eight cases (7.3%), including vascular injuries of the renal artery in two, and of the renal vein, inferior vena cava and right adrenal vein in one case each. Injury of the large bowel and splenic hylus was recorded in one case and malfunction of the vascular endoGIA stapler leading to severe bleeding in one case. Nine cases were converted to open surgery (8.2%), four of them urgently due to intraoperative complications, while in another five cases conversions were elective following poor progression of the laparoscopic procedure. Comparison of the complication rate at follow-up between the initial 50 and the last 60 patients revealed no change. The conversion rate dropped significantly along the learning curve with 7 cases converted among the initial 50 patients, versus 2 in the last 60. There was no perioperative mortality. In two cases we recorded major postoperative complications, including pneumothorax treated by insertion of a thoracic drain and incarcerated inguinal hernia treated by surgery, while minor complications were seen in five patients. Histologic examination showed renal cell carcinoma pT1-T3a in 62 patients, oncocytoma in 5, transitional cell carcinoma T1G2-T3G3N1 in 10, renal sarcoma in 1, metastasis from lung tumor in 1, and end-stage kidney in the remainder. Negative margins were obtained in all cases.

Conclusions: Laparoscopic nephrectomy may be currently considered a routine, safe and effective procedure associated with minimal morbidity. The conversion rate seemed to drop significantly after 50 cases. In view of the inherent benefits for patients, in terms of reduced pain level, faster recovery and improved cosmetic results, the laparoscopic approach has become the standard approach for nephrectomy in our institution. 

October 2004
Y. Mor, I. Leibovitch, N. Sherr-Lurie, J. Golomb, P. Jonas and J. Ramon
June 2004
J. Kundel, R. Pfeffer, M. Lauffer, J. Ramon, R. Catane and Z. Symone

Background: The role of prostatic fossa radiation as salvage therapy in the setting of a rising prostate-specific antigen following radical prostatectomy is not well defined.

Objectives: To study the efficacy and safety of pelvic and prostatic fossa radiation therapy following radical prostatectomy for adenocarcinoma.

Methods: A retrospective review of 1,050 patient charts treated at the Sheba Medical Center for prostate cancer between 1990 and 2002 identified 48 patients who received post-prostatectomy pelvic and prostatic fossa radiotherapy for biochemical failure. Two patients were classified as T-1, T2A-9, T2B-19, T3A-7 and T3B-11. Gleason score was 2–4 in 9 patients, 5–6 in 22 patients, 7 in 10 patients and 8–10 in 7 patients. Positive surgical margins were noted in 28 patients (58%) of whom 18 had single and 10 had multiple positive margins. Radiation was delivered with 6 mV photons using a four-field box to the pelvis followed by two lateral arcs to the prostatic fossa.

Results: At a median follow-up of 34.3 months (25th, 75th) (14.7, 51,3) since radiation therapy, 32 patients (66%) are free of disease or biochemical failure. Exploratory analysis revealed that a pre-radiation PSA[1] less than 2 ng/ml was associated with a failure rate of 24% compared with 66% in patients with a pre-radiation PSA greater than 2 ng/ml (chi-square P < 0.006).

Conclusions: For patients with biochemical failure following radical prostatectomy early salvage radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment option.






[1] PSA = prostate-specific antigen


August 2001
Ilan Leibovitch, MD, Ronan Lev, MD, Yoram Mor, MD, Jacob Golomb, MD, Zohar A. Dotan and Jacob Ramon, MD

Background: Extensive necrosis is rare in primary renal cell carcinoma. This finding may reflect the biological characteristics of the carcinoma and therefore could be of prognostic and clinical value.

Objectives: To assess the incidence of necrosis in renal cell carcinoma and its potential prognostic value.

Methods: We conducted a consecutive retrospective study of 173 patients after radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma. Clinical and pathological data were collected from hospital medical records and compiled into a computerized database.

Results: Extensive necrosis was found in 31 tumor specimens (17.9%). Univariate analysis showed that the specimens with extensive necrosis were significantly larger and manifested more perirenal and venous extension than the tumors without necrosis. The size of the renal tumor was the only parameter that remained significant in multivariate analysis (P=0.0001). Overall disease-free survival did not differ significantly between patients with necrotic tumors and those without (68% and 66% respectively).

Conclusions: The finding of extensive necrosis in renal cell carcinoma specimens does not seem to be related to tumor biology but rather may reflect the relation between size and vascularity of the tumor.

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