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עמוד בית
Tue, 04.10.22

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April 2020
Shira Rabinowicz, Marina Rubinshtein, Tzipora Strauss, Galia Barkai, Amir Vardi and Gideon Paret
July 2011
K. Machol, A. Vivante, M. Rubinsthein, B. Dekel, Joseph Danieli and G. Paret
August 2003
April 2003
R. Ben-Abraham, E. Hadad, A.A. Weinbroum, O. Efrat and G. Paret

Vasopressin is a potent endogenous vasoconstrictor that increases blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance. The administration of exogenous vasopressin during closed and open cardiopulmonary resuscitation in humans was shown to be more effective than optimal doses of epinephrine in several clinical studies. We summarize here the recent experimental and clinical data on the use of vasopressin in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and septic shock. As the use of vasopressin in human resuscitation is now in its early stages, it is expected that accumulated future experience will shed more light regarding the risk-benefit aspects of its use.

July 2000
Ron Ben-Abraham MD, Avi A. Weinbroum MD, Yoram Kluger MD, Michael Stein MD, Zohar Barzilay MD FCCM and Gideon Paret MD

Background: General pediatricians in Israel are actively involved in the initial evaluation, resuscitation and management of traumatized children. However, pediatric trauma care is not a part of pediatric specialty training in Israel, and the few Advanced Trauma Life SupportR courses per year are insufficient for most pediatricians working in accident and emergency care.

Objective: To examine the value of the course in relation to the limited resources available for such training.

Methods: A telephone survey of 115 pediatricians who had taken the course between 1990 and 1994 was conducted. The responding physicians (67%) were asked to complete a specially designed questionnaire on life-saving procedures that were taught in the course. In addition, they were asked to subjectively assess the practical utility of the course.

Results: Forty-three (56%) pediatricians reported that they routinely treated both adult and pediatric trauma cases. Of these, 81% performed 27 life-saving ATLSR procedures. Pediatric trauma was treated by only 22 (28%), of whom 72.3% performed 18 life-saving ATLSR procedures. These pediatricians ranked the courses as being "very high" to "high" in impact.

Conclusions: These figures indicate that an ATLSR course designed specifically for pediatricians can markedly improve pediatric trauma care. To ensure standard education and patient care, such a course should be developed and made a mandatory component of residency training. Further studies to examine the objective impact of the courses on pediatric trauma care should be carried out.

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ATLS= Advanced Trauma Life Support

November 1999
Gideon Paret MD, Tamar Ziv MD, Arie Augarten MD, Asher Barzilai MD, Ron Ben-Abraham MD, Amir Vardi MD, Yossi Manisterski MD and Zohar Barzilay MD, FCCM

Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a well-recognized condition resulting in high permeability pulmonary edema associated with a high morbidity.

Objectives: To examine a 10 year experience of predisposing factors, describe the clinical course, and assess predictors of mortality in children with this syndrome.

Methods: The medical records of all admissions to the pediatric intensive care unit over a 10 year period were evaluated to identify children with ARDS1. Patients were considered to have ARDS if they met all of the following criteria: acute onset of diffuse bilateral pulmonary infiltrates of non-cardiac origin and severe hypoxemia defined by <200 partial pressure of oxygen during ³6 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure for a minimum of 24 hours. The medical records were reviewed for demographic, clinical, and physiologic information including PaO22 /forced expiratory O2, alveolar–arterial O2 difference, and ventilation index.

Results: We identified 39 children with the adult respiratory distress syndrome. Mean age was 7.4 years (range 50 days to 16 years) and the male:female ratio was 24:15. Predisposing insults included sepsis, pneumonias, malignancy, major trauma, shock, aspiration, near drowning, burns, and envenomation. The mortality rate was 61.5%. Predictors of death included the PaO2/FIO2, ventilation index and A-aDO23 on the second day after diagnosis. Non-survivors had significantly lower PaO2/FIO2 (116±12 vs. 175±8.3, P<0.001), and higher A-aDO2 (368±28.9 vs. 228.0±15.5, P<0.001) and ventilation index (43.3±2.9 vs. 53.1±18.0, P<0.001) than survivors.

Conclusions: Local mortality outcome for ARDS is comparable to those in tertiary referral institutions in the United States and Western Europe. The PaO2/FIO2, A-aDO2 and ventilation index are valuable for predicting outcome in ARDS by the second day of conventional therapy. The development of a local risk profile may allow early application of innovative therapies in this population. 

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1ARDS = acute respiratory distress syndrome

2 PaO2 = partial pressure of oxygen

3A-aDO2 = alveolar–arterial O2 difference

Ron Ben-Abraham MD, Michael Stein MD, Gideon Paret MD, Robert Cohen MD, Joshua Shemer MD, Avraham Rivkind MD and Yoram Kluger MD
Background: Since its introduction in Israel, more than 4,000 physicians from various specialties and diverse medical backgrounds have participated in the Advanced Trauma Life Support course.

Objectives: To analyze the factors that influence the success of physicians in the ATLS®1 written tests.

Methods: A retrospective study was conducted of 4,475 physicians participating in the Israeli ATLS® training program between 1990 and 1996. Several variables in the records of these physicians were related to their success or failure in the final written examination of the course.

Results: Age, the region of medical schooling, and the medical specialty were found to significantly influence the successful completion of the ATLS® course.

Conclusions: Physicians younger than 45 years of age or with a surgical specialty are more likely to graduate the ATLS® course. The success rate could be improved if the program’s text and questionnaires were translated into Hebrew. 

1ATLS® = Advanced Trauma Life Support

September 1999
Ron Ben-Abraham, MD, Michael Stein, MD, Gideon Paret, MD, Avishy Goldberg, MD, Joshua Shemer, MD and Yoram Kluger, MD.
 Background: In the military environment it is the medics who usually provide the initial care of mass casualties in the field.

Objectives: To determine the number of incidents of trauma encountered by medics in the Israel Defense Forces during peacetime, and to ascertain the role of these medics in providing primary trauma care to the victims.

Methods: A retrospective questionnaire, reviewing the activities of medics in treating injured trauma victims, was distributed to medics who were in service for at least 2 years after their professional training.

Results: Of the 128 responding medics, 87 (68%) had actively participated in the treatment of trauma victims under various circumstances. The average number of trauma events was 1.2 events over a period of 2 years per combat medic, and 0.7 for medics stationed in rear units. Their activities included insertion of numerous intravenous fluid lines (57% of medics), assistance in intubations (37%), tube thoracostomies (23%), insertions of central catheters (14%) or orogastric tubes (28%), and manual ventilations (41%).

Conclusion: Since it is difficult to increase the level of practical experience in dealing with trauma within the military framework, new techniques should be applied to improve the trauma training.

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