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עמוד בית
Sun, 26.05.24

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March 2023
Ariel Tessone MD, Moti Harats MD

Background: In late 2019, a new strain of coronavirus (coronavirus disease 2019 [COVID-19]) spread rapidly throughout the world. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons reported a pandemic-related surge in the demand for aesthetic surgery compared to the same popularity of procedures prior to the pandemic.

Objectives: To determine whether this phenomenon also occurred in Israel.

Methods: We collected data from three leading private medical centers in Tel Aviv. Data were compared for the years 2019 and 2020 by surgical procedure. Number of orthopedic, gynecologic, and hand procedures served as control data.

Results: We present a detailed pandemic-related timeline relevant to aesthetic surgery in Israel. Overall, the demand for aesthetic surgery increased, with a marked trend toward body contouring procedures.

Conclusions: The Israeli aesthetic surgery market was affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, with a post-closure surge. The popularity and number of procedures are unique to the Israeli market.

November 2020
Uri Aviv MD, Ariel Berl M, Josef Haik MD MPH, Ariel Tessone MD, and Moti Harats MD

Background: Burn injuries are an extreme form of traumatic injury and are a global health issue. The Israeli National Burn Unit at the Sheba Medical Center, a tertiary level 1 trauma center and hence the national referral center, treats burn patients admitted both directly and referred from other medical centers. The transfer and handover of patients is a critical step in patient care. In Israel, to date, there is no standardized and accepted transfer request form for burn patients from one medical facility to another.

Objectives: To construct a transfer request form to be used in all future burn patient referrals.

Methods: After reviewing publicly available international transfer forms and comparing them to the admission checklist used at our unit, a structured transfer request form was constructed.

Results: After a pilot study period, testing the form in various scenarios and adapting it, the first standardized transfer form for burn patients in Israel in both English and Hebrew was implemented beginning May 2020.

Conclusions: Implementation of a standardized transfer process will improve communication between healthcare professionals to help maintain a continuum of care. We believe that implementation of a burn transfer form in all future referrals can standardize and assure better care for burn patients, thus improving overall patient care.

May 2016
Eran Millet MD, Josef Haik MD, Elad Ofir MD, Yael Mardor MD, Eyal Winkler MD, Moti Harats MD and Ariel Tessone MD

Background: Although fat grafting is a common technique to repair defects after breast cancer reconstruction surgery and has a low complication rate, the relation between fat grafting and the risk of breast cancer is unknown. Clinical trials to investigate this connection can elucidate the benefits and potential risks of fat grafting in oncology patients.

Objectives:To establish an efficient experimental model, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, for comparing different breast tumor study groups post-fat grafting. 

Methods: Breast tumor cells were injected into immunocompromised mice. After tumors formed they were removed. Liposuction was performed in a female human donor and fat was collected. Cells were extracted from the fat by enzymatic digestion. Immunocompromised mice were randomized into four groups: a preliminary experiment group and three equal groups according to the type of fat graft: (i) fresh fat enriched with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs), (ii) fresh fat without cell enrichment, and (iii) no fat injected. Tumor volume was assessed by serial MRI scans. 

Results: The rate of tumor growth was higher in the enriched fat group compared to the non-enriched fat group. 

Conclusions: This experimental model is an effective measurable method, allowing future investigation of the effect of autologous fat on breast cancer.

 

September 2007
J. Haik, A. Liran, A. Tessone, A. Givon, A. Orenstein and K. Peleg

Background: Burns are a major public health problem, with long hospitalization stay in both intensive care units and general wards. In Israel about 5% of all hospitalized injuries are burn injuries. There are no long-term epidemiological studies on burn injuries in adults in Israel.

Objectives: To identify risk factors for burn injuries and provide a starting point for the establishment of an effective prevention plan.

Methods: We analyzed the demographic, etiologic and clinical data of 5000 burn patients admitted to the five major hospitals with burn units in Israel during a 7 year period (1997–2003). Data were obtained from the records of the Israeli National Trauma Registry. The differences between various groups were evaluated using the chi-square test.

Results: Male gender was twice as frequent as female gender in burn patients (68.0% vs. 31.9%), and Jewish ethnicity was more common than non-Jewish (62.3% vs. 36.8%). Second and third-degree burns with body surface areas less than 10% constituted the largest group (around 50%). The largest age group was 0–1 years, constituting 22.2% of the cases. Inhalation injury was uncommon (1.9%). The most common etiologies were hot liquids (45.8%) and open fire (27.5%). Children less than 10 years old were burnt mainly by hot liquids while the main cause of burns for adults > 20 years old was an open flame. The majority of burns occurred at home (58%); around 15% were work related. The mean duration of hospitalization was 13.7 days (SD 17.7); 15.5% were in an intensive care unit with a mean duration of 12.1 days (SD 17.1). Surgical procedures became more common during the period of the study (from 13.4% in 1998 to 26.59% in 2002, average 19.8%). The mortality rate was 4.4%. We found a strong correlation between burn degree and total body surface area and mortality (0.25% mortality for 2nd to 3rd-degree burns with less than 10% TBSA[1], 5.4% for 2nd to 3rd-degree burns with 20–39% TBSA, and 96.6% for burns > 90% TBSA). The worst prognosis was for those over the age of 70 (mortality rate 35.3%) and the best prognosis was for the 0–1 year group (survival rate 99.6%).

Conclusions: The groups at highest risk were children 0–1 years old, males and non-Jews (the incidence rate among non-Jews was 1.5 times higher than their share in the general population). Those with the highest mortality rate were victims of burns > 90% TBSA and patients older than 70. Most burns occurred at home.






[1] TBSA = total body surface area


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