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עמוד בית
Fri, 21.06.24

ORIGINALS

IMAJ | volume 26

Journal 4, April 2024
pages: 211-215

The Nuremberg Racial Laws: The End of Jewish Medical Teaching in Germany. Who Were the Last Jewish Medical Professors in Berlin?

1 Department of Pediatrics, Shamir Medical Center (Assaf Harofeh), Zerifin, Israel 2 Department of Pediatric Emergency, Shamir Medical Center (Assaf Harofeh), Zerifin, Israel 3 Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel 4 Institute for Medical Ethics and History of Medicine, Berlin, Germany

Summary

Background:

On 7 April 1933, the Nazi Law for the Restoration of the Professional Civil Service was enacted. The law triggered the dismissal of most Jewish medical staff from German universities. A few Jewish professors in Berlin were permitted to continue their academic activity with restrictions. Those professors were gradually dismissed as laws and restrictions were enforced.

Objectives:

To identify the last Jewish medical professors who, despite severe restrictions, continued their academic duties and prepared students for their examinations in Berlin after the summer of 1933.

Methods:

We reviewed dissertations written by the medical faculty of Berlin from 1933 to 1937 and identified Jewish professors who mentored students during those years.

Results:

Thirteen Jewish tutors instructed dissertations for the medical examinations after the Nazi regime seized power. They were employees of different university hospitals, including the Jewish hospitals. We did not identify Aryan students instructed by Jewish professors. The professors were active in different medical disciplines. Half of the reviewed dissertations were in the disciplines of surgery and gynecology. The last Jewish tutors were dismissed in October 1935. However, some of their studies were submitted for examination after that date.

Conclusions:

After the Nazi regime seized power, academic activities and medical research by Jewish professors declined but did not stop. However, these professors worked with only Jewish students on their theses. Most dissertations were approved and examined after the Jewish academics were dismissed by the university, in some cases even after they left Germany.

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