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עמוד בית Mon, 26.08.19

April 2015


Focus
Lital Keinan-Boker MD PhD MPH, Hadas Shasha-Lavsky MD, Sofia Eilat-Zanani MD, Adi Edri-Shur MSc and Shaul M. Shasha MD

Abstract

Background: Findings of studies addressing outcomes of war-related famine in non-Jewish populations in Europe during the Second World War (WWII) confirmed an association between prenatal/early life exposure to hunger and adult obesity, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular heart disease and the metabolic syndrome. Fetal programming was suggested as the explanatory mechanism.

Objectives: To study the association between being born during WWII in Europe and physical long-term outcomes in child Holocaust survivors.   

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study on all Jewish Clalit Health Services (CHS) North District members born in 1940–1945 in Europe ('exposed', n=653) or in Israel to Europe-born parents ('non-exposed', n=433). Data on socio-demographic variables, medical diagnoses, medication procurement, laboratory tests and health services utilization were derived from the CHS computerized database and compared between the groups.

Results: The exposed were significantly more likely than the non-exposed to present with dyslipidemia (81% vs. 72%, respectively), hypertension (67% vs. 53%), diabetes mellitus (41% vs. 28%), vascular disease (18% vs. 9%) and the metabolic syndrome (17% vs. 9%). The exposed also made lower use of health services but used anti-depressive agents more often compared to the non-exposed. In multivariate analyses, being born during WWII remained an independent risk marker for hypertension (OR = 1.52), diabetes mellitus (OR = 1.60), vascular disease (OR = 1.99) and the metabolic syndrome (OR = 2.14).

Conclusions: The results of this cross-sectional study based on highly validated data identify a high risk group for chronic morbidity. A question regarding potential trans-generational effects that may impact the ‘second generation’ is also raised.

Original Articles
Eran Leshem-Rubinow MD, Shani Shenhar-Tsarfaty PhD, Assi Milwidsky MD, Sharon Toker PhD, Itzhak Shapira MD, Shlomo Berliner MD, Yael Benyamini PhD, Samuel Melamed PhD and Ori Rogowski MD

Abstract

Background: A single self-rated health (SRH) assessment is associated with clinical outcome and mortality, but the biological process linking SRH with immune status remains incompletely understood.

Objectives: To examine the association between SRH and inflammation in apparently healthy individuals.

Methods: Our analysis included 13,773 apparently healthy individuals attending the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center for periodic health examinations. Estimated marginal means of the inflammation-sensitive biomarkers [i.e., highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and fibrinogen] for the different SRH groups were calculated and adjusted for multiple potential confounders including risk factors, health behavior, socioeconomic status, and coexistent depression.

Results: The group with the lowest SRH had a significantly higher atherothrombotic profile and significantly higher concentrations of all inflammation-sensitive biomarkers in both genders. Hs-CRP was found to differ significantly between SRH groups in both genders even after gradual adjustments for all potential confounders. Fibrinogen differs significantly according to SRH in males only, with low absolute value differences.

Conclusions: A valid association exists for apparently healthy individuals of both genders between inflammation-sensitive biomarker levels and SRH categories, especially when comparing levels of hs-CRP. Our findings underscore the importance of assessing SRH and treating it like other markers of poor health.

Ada Rosen MD, Alexander Condrea MD, Mordechai Shimonov MD and Shimon Ginath MD

Abstract                          

Background: A new device, the CCS-30 Contour Transtar, was recently launched for the treatment of obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS).

Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of the Contour Transtar in resection of true rectal prolapse in relation to age and concomitant urogynecologic procedures.

Methods: During a 50 (median) month period 15 women with rectal prolapse of ≥ 5 cm and complaints of obstructed defecation underwent perineal resection of rectal prolapse with the Contour Transtar.

Results: In 3 of the 15 patients (20%) rectal prolapse recurred. Amelioration of ODS symptoms and improved continence were noted in 82% and 75%, respectively, following surgery.

Conclusions: The Contour Transtar procedure for full-thickness rectal prolapse is a safe and promising procedure and is likely suitable for elderly poor risk patients. 

Vered Schichter-Konfino MD, Katalin Halasz, Galia Grushko, Ayelet Snir PhD, Tharwat Haj PhD, Zahava Vadasz MD PhD, Aharon Kessel MD, Israel Potasman MD and Elias Toubi MD

Abstract

Background: The mass influx of immigrants from tuberculosis-endemic countries into Israel was followed by a considerable increase in the incidence of tuberculosis (TB). All contacts of active TB patients are obliged to be screened by tuberculin skin tests (TST) and, if found positive, prophylactic treatment is considered.

Objectives: To assess the utility of interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-release assay with a prolonged follow-up in preventing unnecessary anti-TB therapy in individuals with suspected false positive results.

Methods: Between 2008 and 2012 the QuantiFERON TB gold-in-tube test (QFT-G) was performed in 278 sequential individuals who were mostly TST-positive and/or were in contact with an active TB patient. In all, whole blood was examined by the IFNγ-release assay. We correlated the TST diameter with the QFT-G assay and followed those patients with a negative assay.

Results: The QFT-G test was positive in only 72 (42%) of all 171 TST-positive individuals. There was no correlation between the diameter of TST and QFT-G positivity. Follow-up over 5 years was available in 128 (62%) of all QFT-G-negative individuals. All remained well and none developed active TB.

Conclusions: A negative QFT-G test may obviate the need for anti-TB therapy in more than half of those with a positive TST.

Dorit E. Zilberman MD, Uri Rimon MD, Roy Morag MD, Harry Z. Winkler MD, Jacob Ramon MD and Yoram Mor MD

Abstract

Background: Iatrogenic ureteral injury may be seen following abdominopelvic surgeries. While ureteral injuries identified during surgery should be immediately and surgically repaired, those that are postoperatively diagnosed may be treated non-surgically by draining the ipsilateral kidney. Data regarding the outcome of this approach are still missing.

Objectives: To evaluate the success rates of non-surgical management of ureteral injuries diagnosed following abdominopelvic surgeries.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the files of all patients treated for iatrogenic ureteral injuries diagnosed following abdominopelvic surgeries. Patients' ipsilateral kidney was percutaneously drained following diagnosis of injury by either nephrostomy tube (NT)/nephro-ureteral stent (NUS) or double-J stent (DJS) inserted retrogradely. The tube was left in place until a pyelogram confirmed healing or a conservative approach was abandoned due to failure.

Results: Twenty-nine patients were identified as having ureteral injury following abdominopelvic surgery. Median time from injury to renal drainage was 9 days, interquartile range (IQR) 4–17 days. Seven cases (24%) had surgical repair. Among the other 22 patients, in 2 oncology patients the conservative approach was maintained although renal drainage failed to resolve the injury. In the remaining 20, median drainage length was 60 days (IQR 43.5–85). Calculated overall success rates following renal drainage was 69% (18/29), and with NS approached 78.5%.

Conclusions: Ureteral injuries diagnosed following abdominopelvic surgeries can be treated conservatively. Ipsilateral renal drainage should be the first line of treatment before surgical repair, and NUS may be the preferred drainage to obtain spontaneous ureteral healing. 

Guy Slonimsky MD, Eldar Carmel MD, Michael Drendel MD, Noga Lipschitz MD and Michael Wolf MD

Abstract

Background: Laryngeal cleft (LC) is a rare congenital anomaly manifesting in a variety of symptoms including swallowing disorders and aspirations, dyspnea, stridor and hoarseness. The mild forms (types I-II) may be underdiagnosed, leading to protracted symptomatology and morbidity. 

Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic process, clinical course, management and outcome in children with type I-II laryngeal clefts.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective case analysis for the years 2005–2012 in a tertiary referral center.

Results: Seven children were reviewed: five boys and two girls, aged from birth to 5 years. The most common presenting symptoms were cough, aspirations and pneumonia. Evaluation procedures included fiber-optic laryngoscopy (FOL), direct laryngoscopy (DL) and videofluoroscopy. Other pathologies were seen in three children. Six children underwent successful endoscopic surgery and one child was treated conservatively. The postoperative clinical course was uneventful in most of the cases.

Conclusions: Types I-II LC should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children presenting with protracted cough and aspirations. DL is crucial for establishing the diagnosis. Endoscopic surgery is safe and should be applied promptly when conservative measures fail. 

Case Communications
Nir Gal-or MD, Tamir Gil MD, Issa Metanes MD, Munir Nashshibi MD, Leonid Bryzgalin MD, Aharon Amir MD and Yaron Har-Shai MD
Irena Barbarov MD, Maya Koren Michowitz MD, Ginette Schiby MD, Orit Portnoy MD, David Livingstone MD and Gad Segal MD
Jana Petríková MD PhD, Peter Jarčuška MDPhD, Marián Švajdler MD, Daniel Pella MD PhD and Želmíra Macejová MD PhD MPH
Lior Zeller MD, Leonid Barski MD, Elena Shleyfer MD, Uri Netz MD, Vered Stavi MD and Mahmoud Abu-Shakra MD
Ori Liran, Eugene Kots MD and Howard Amital MD MHA
הבהרה משפטית: כל נושא המופיע באתר זה נועד להשכלה בלבד ואין לראות בו ייעוץ רפואי או משפטי. אין הר"י אחראית לתוכן המתפרסם באתר זה ולכל נזק שעלול להיגרם. כל הזכויות על המידע באתר שייכות להסתדרות הרפואית בישראל. מדיניות פרטיות
ז'בוטינסקי 35 רמת גן, בניין התאומים 2 קומות 10-11, ת.ד. 3566, מיקוד 5213604. טלפון: 03-6100444, פקס: 03-5753303