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עמוד בית
Tue, 16.04.24

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February 2004
Y. Schwammenthal, M.J. Drescher, O. Merzeliak, R. Tsabari, B. Bruk, M. Feibel, C. Hoffman, M. Bakon, Z. Rotstein, J. Chapman and D. Tanne

Background: Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator therapy within 3 hours of stroke onset is a proven effective treatment for acute ischemic stroke.

Objectives: To assess the feasibility and safety of rt-PA[1] therapy for reperfusion in routine clinical practice in Israel, in a setting of a dedicated stroke unit.

Methods: Consecutive patients presenting within less than 3 hours of stroke onset were evaluated by an emergency physician and the neurology stroke team. After brain computerized tomography eligible patients were treated with intravenous rt-PA (0.9 mg/kg; maximum dose 90 mg) according to an in-hospital protocol corresponding to recommended criteria. Patients were admitted to the acute stroke unit. Safety and clinical outcome were routinely assessed. Re-canalization was assessed by serial transcranial Doppler.

Results: The study group comprised 16 patients, mean age 61 years (range 47–80 years), male to female ratio 10:6, whose median baseline National Institutes of Health stroke scale was 13 (range 6–24). They were treated within a mean door-to-CT time of 39 minutes (range 17–62 min), door-to-drug time 101 minutes (range 72–150), and stroke onset-to-drug time 151 minutes (range 90–180). There was an early improvement within 24 hours (of ≥ 4 points in the NIHSS[2] score) in 7 patients (44%) and no early deteriorations. There were no protocol deviations, no symptomatic intracranial hemorrhages, and no major systemic hemorrhage within 36 hours of rt-PA treatment. Three asymptomatic hemorrhagic transformations of the infarct were noted on routine follow-up brain CT associated with neurologic improvement. Outcome data were comparable to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke rt-PA Stroke Study.

Conclusion: Intravenous rt-PA treatment within 3 hours of stroke onset in routine clinical practice in Israel is feasible and appears safe in the setting of a neurology stroke unit and team. Careful implementation of rt-PA therapy for selected patients in Israel is encouraged.






[1] rt-PA = recombinant tissue plasminogen activator



[2] NIHSS = National Institutes of Health stroke scale


March 2002
Zeev Rotstein, MD, MHA, Rachel Wilf-Miron, MD, MPH, Bruno Lavi BA, Daniel S. Seidman, MD, MMSc, Poriah Shahaf, MD, MBA, Amir Shahar, MD, MPH, Uri Gabay, MD, MPH and Shlomo Noy, MD, MBA

Background: The emergency department is one of the hospital’s busiest facilities and is frequently described as a bottleneck. Management by constraint is a managerial methodology that helps to focus on the most critical issues by identifying such bottlenecks. Based on this theory, the benefit of adding medical staff may depend on whether or not physician availability is the bottleneck in the system.

Objective: To formulate a dynamic statistical model to forecast the need for allocating additional medical staff to improve the efficacy of work in the emergency department, taking into account patient volume.

Methods: The daily number of non-trauma admissions to the general ED[1] was assessed for the period 1 January 1992 to 1 December 1995 using the hospital computerized database. The marginal benefit to shortening patient length of stay in the ED by adding a physician during the evening shift was examined for different patient volumes. Data were analyzed with the SAS software package using a Gross Linear Model.

Results: The addition of a physician to the ED staff from noon to midnight significantly shortened patient LOS[2]: an average decrease of 6.61 minutes for 80–119 admissions (P<0.001). However, for less than 80 or more than 120 admissions, adding a physician did not have a significant effect on LOS in the ED.

Conclusions: The dynamic model formulated in this study shows that patient volume determines the effectiveness of investing manpower in the ED. Identifying bottleneck critical factors, as suggested by the theory of constraints, may be useful for planning and coordinating emergency services that operate under stressful and unpredictable conditions. Consideration of patient volume may also provide ED managers with a logical basis for staffing and resource allocation.






[1] ED = emergency department



[2] LOS = length of stay


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