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עמוד בית
Tue, 23.04.24

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January 2020
Eitan Neeman MD, Nitza Heiman Newman MD MHA, Yuval Cavari MD, Yael Feinstein MD, Yulia Fuxman MD and Isaac Lazar MD

Background: Temporary abdominal closure (TAC) surgical technique relates to a procedure in which the post-surgical abdominal wall remains open in certain indications. The Bogota bag (BB) technique is a tension-free TAC method that covers the abdominal contents with a sterilized fluid bag. There are very few reports of pediatric patients treated with this technique.

Objectives: To describe our institution’s 15 years of experience using the BB technique on pediatric patients.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study describing our experience treating patients with BB was conducted. The medical files of 17 pediatric patients aged 0–18 years were reviewed.

Results: Between January 2000 and December 2014, 17 patients were treated with BB at our medical center (6 females, median age 12 years). Indications for BB were a need for a surgical site re-exploration, mechanical inability for primary abdominal closure, and high risk for ACS development. Median BB duration was 5 days and median bag replacement was 2 days. Median ICU length of stay (LOS) was 10 days and hospital LOS was 27 days. The ICU admission and BB procedure was tolerated well by 6 patients who were discharged home without complications. Of the remaining 11 patients, 6 patients died during the admission (35%) and the others presented with major complications not related to the BB but to the patient's primary disease.

Conclusions: This report represents the largest series of children treated with BB. The technique is simple to perform, inexpensive, and has very few complications.

July 2011
G. Pines, Y. Klein, E. Melzer, E. Idelevich, V. Buyeviz, S. Machlenkin and H. Kashtan

Background: Surgery is considered the mainstay of treatment for esophageal carcinoma. Transhiatal esophagectomy with cervical esophagogastric anastomosis is considered relatively safe with an oncological outcome comparable to that using the transthoracic approach.

Objectives: To review the results of the first 100 transhiatal esophagectomies performed in a single Israeli center.

Methods: The records of all patients who had undergone transhiatal esophagectomy during the period 2003–2009 were reviewed. The study group comprised the first 100 patients. All patients who had undergone colon or small bowel transposition were excluded. Indications for surgery included esophageal cancer, caustic injury and achalasia.

Results: The median follow-up period was 19.5 months. The anastomotic leakage rate was 15% and all were managed successfully with local wound care. The benign stricture rate was 10% and all were managed successfully with endoscopic balloon dilation. Anastomotic leakage was found to be a risk factor for stricture formation. Overall survival was 54%. Response to neoadjuvant therapy was associated with a favorable prognosis.

Conclusions: Transhiatal esophagectomy is a relatively safe approach with adequate oncological results, as long as it is performed in a high volume center.
 

August 2009
L. Dotan, M. Icekson, R. Yanko-Arzi, A. Ofek, R. Neuman and A. Margulis

Background: Tissue expansion is a well-recognized technique for reconstructing a wide variety of skin and soft tissue defects. Its application in the pediatric population has enabled the plastic surgeon to achieve functional and aesthetic goals that were previously unobtainable.

Objectives: To review the use of tissue expansion in the pediatric population, with particular emphasis on indication, operative technique, regional considerations and how to avoid complications.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data on 103 expanded flap reconstructions performed in 41 pediatric patients during the period 2003–2006. Tissue expanders were placed on a subcutaneous plane above the fascia and inflated weekly. The expanded skin was used as a transposition flap or a full thickness skin graft for the reconstruction of the involved area. Forty-three tissue expanders were inserted to the head and neck in 21 patients, 45 were inserted to the trunk in 13 patients and 15 were inserted to the groin and lower extremity in 8 patients. Twenty-eight patients had one round of tissue expansion, while 13 patients had two to six rounds. A plastic surgeon, medical student and a lawyer reviewed the patients' photographs and evaluated their aesthetic outcome:

Results: Eighty-six percent of the head and neck reconstructions and 40% of the trunk and extremity reconstructions were graded as having excellent aesthetic outcome, and 11% of the head and neck reconstructions and 37% of the trunk and extremity reconstructions were graded with good aesthetic outcome. The remaining patients were graded with moderate outcome. None of our patients was graded as poor aesthetic outcome. Complications included infection in 6 patients (6%), extrusion in 3 (3%), hematoma in 2 (2%), flap ischemia in one patient (1%), and expander perforation after percutaneous stabbing in one patient (1%).

Conclusions: Tissue expansion is an efficient and valuable technique for reconstruction of large skin lesions and scars.

April 2007
D. Spiegelstein, P.l Ghosh, L. Sternik, S. Tager, A. Shinfeld and E. Raanani

Background: During the last decade new surgical techniques for mitral valve repair were developed. We have been using those techniques in order to widen the spectrum of patients eligible for MV[1] repair.

Objectives: To assess the operative and mid-term results a wide variety of surgical techniques.

Methods: From January 2004 through December 2006, 213 patients underwent MV repair in our institution. Valve pathology was degenerative in 123 patients (58%), ischemic in 37 (17%), showed annular dilatation in 25 (12%), endocarditis in 16 (8%), was rheumatic in 13 (6%), and due to other causes in 14 (7%). Preoperative New York Heart Association score was 2.35 ± 0.85 and ejection fraction 53 ± 12%. Isolated MV repair was performed in 90 patients (42%) and 158 concomitant procedures were done in 123 patients (58%). A wide variety of surgical techniques was used in order to increase the number of repairs compared to valve replacement.

Results: There were 7 in-hospital deaths (3.3%). NYHA[2] class improved from 2.19 ± 0.85 to 1.4 ± 0.6, and freedom from reoperation was 100%. Echocardiography follow-up of patients with degenerative MV revealed that 93% of the patients (115/123) were free of mitral regurgitation greater than 2+ grade. In patients operated by a minimal invasive approach there were no conversions to sternotomy, no late deaths, none required reoperation, and 96% were free of MR[3] greater than 2+ grade. The use of multiple surgical techniques enabled the repair of more than 80% of pure MR cases.

Conclusions: MV repair provides good perioperative and mid-term results, and supports the preference for MV repair over replacement, when feasible. Multiple valve repair techniques tailored to different pathologies increases the feasibility of mitral repair.







[1] MV = mitral valve

[2] NYHA = New York Heart Association

[3] MR = mitral regurgitation


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