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עמוד בית
Sun, 25.09.22

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March 2013
S. Luria, G. Rivkin, M. Avitzour, M. Liebergall, Y. Mintz and R. Mosheiff
 Background: Explosion injuries to the upper extremity have specific clinical characteristics that differ from injuries due to other mechanisms.

Objectives: To evaluate the upper extremity injury pattern of attacks on civilian targets, comparing bomb explosion injuries to gunshot injuries and their functional recovery using standard outcome measures.

Methods: Of 157 patients admitted to the hospital between 2000 and 2004, 72 (46%) sustained explosion injuries and 85 (54%) gunshot injuries. The trauma registry files were reviewed and the patients completed the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire (DASH) and Short Form-12 (SF-12) after a minimum period of 1 year.

Results: Of the 157 patients, 72 (46%) had blast injuries and 85 (54%) had shooting injuries. The blast casualties had higher Injury Severity Scores (47% over a score of 16 vs. 22%, P = 0.02) and higher percent of patients treated in intensive care units (47% vs. 28%, P = 0.02). Although the Abbreviated Injury Scale score of the upper extremity injury was similar in the two groups, the blast casualties were found to have more bilateral and complex soft tissue injuries and were treated surgically more often. No difference was found in the SF-12 or DASH scores between the groups at follow up.  

Conclusions: The casualties with upper extremity blast injuries were more severely injured and sustained more bilateral and complex soft tissue injuries to the upper extremity. However, the rating of the local injury to the isolated limb is similar, as was the subjective functional recovery.

 

August 2003
S. Luria, L. Kandel, D. Segal, M. Liebergall and Y. Mattan

Background: Revision of total knee arthroplasties are performed with increasing frequency due to the increasing numbers of primary arthroplasties.

Objectives: To retrospectively analyze 71 patients who underwent 78 revision total knee arthroplasties during the years 1991 to 1999

Methods: We evaluated the revised knees using the Knee Society Clinical Rating System after an average follow-up period of 3 years and 9 months (2–10 years). The indications for revision included pain and instability, deep infection of the joint, complaints linked to the patella, or post-trauma to the operated knee.

Results: The average knee score (evaluation of the knee joint itself) calculated after the revision was 74.5. The results on the knee score were excellent (>85) in 48% of patients and poor (<60) in 22%. The functional results (patients’ ability to walk and climb stairs) were only 48.3.

Conclusion: Although the revision of total knee replacements is known to be problematic, most patients show good results on knee examination, and reasonable functional results given the factors involved.

July 2002
Aviv Vidan, MD, Shai Luria, MD, Arik Eisenkraft, MD and Ariel Hourvitz, MD

The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard affects primarily the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. Of these, ocular injury is the most immediate and distressing. Learning to recognize ocular injury enables the treating physician to provide early and suitable treatment, which will reduce complications and allow the victim a rapid recovery.

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