• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Wed, 24.07.24

Search results


September 2005
M. Vaiman, S. Sarfaty, N. Shlamkovich, S. Segal and E. Eviatar
 Objectives: Endonasal operations such as septoplasty, rhinoplasty, nasal septal reconstruction and conchotomy, as well as endoscopic sinus surgery, especially when combined with turbinectomy and/or submucous resection of the septum, may produce bleeding and postoperative hematoma requiring postoperative hemostatic measures. Since nasal packing may cause pain, rhinorrhea and inconvenience, a more effective and less uncomfortable hemostatic technique is needed.

Objectives: To compare the hemostatic efficacy of the second-generation surgical sealant (Quixil™ in Europe and Israel, Crosseal™ in the USA) to that of nasal packing in endonasal surgery.

Methods: We conducted a prospective randomized trial that included 494 patients (selected from 529 using exclusion and inclusion criteria and completed follow-up) undergoing the above-mentioned endonasal procedures. Patients were assigned to one of three surgical groups: septoplasty + conchotomy + nasal packing or fibrin sealant (Group 1); ESS[1] + nasal packing or fibrin sealant (Group 2); and ESS + septoplasty + conchotomy + nasal packing or fibrin sealant (Group 3). The hemostatic effects were evaluated objectively in the clinic by anterior rhinoscopy and endoscopy and assessed subjectively by the patients at follow-up visits.

Results: Postoperative hemorrhage occurred in 22.9–25% of patients with nasal packing vs. 3.12–4.65% in the fibrin sealant groups (late hemorrhage only). Drainage and ventilation of the paranasal sinuses, which are impaired in all cases of packing, remained normal in the fibrin sealant group. There were no allergic reactions to the sealant.

Conclusions: Our results show that fibrin sealant by aerosol spray in endonasal surgery is more effective and convenient than nasal packing. It requires no special treatment, i.e., antibiotics, which are usually used if nasal packing is involved.

_____________________

[1] ESS = endoscopic sinus surgery

June 2005
A. Kessler, H. Gavriel, S. Zahav, M. Vaiman, N. Shlamkovitch, S. Segal and E. Eviatar
 Background: Fine-needle aspiration biopsy has been well established as a diagnostic technique for selecting patients with thyroid nodules for surgical treatment, thereby reducing the number of unnecessary surgical procedures performed in cases of non-malignant tumors.

Objectives: To evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values of FNAB[1] in cases of a solitary thyroid nodule.

Methods: The preoperative FNAB results of 170 patients who underwent thyroidectomy due to a solitary thyroid nodule were compared retrospectively with the final postoperative pathologic diagnoses.

Results: In cases of a solitary thyroid nodule, FNAB had a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 98.5%, accuracy of 87%, and positive and negative predictive values of 98.75% and 76.6% respectively. All cases of papillary carcinoma diagnosed by FNAB proved to be malignant on final histology, while 8 of 27 cases of follicular adenoma detected by preoperative FNAB were shown to be malignant on final evaluation of the surgical specimen.

Conclusions: FNAB cytology reduces the incidence of thyroidectomy since this method has excellent specificity and sensitivity and a low rate of false-negative results. It proved to be cost-effective and is recommended as the first tool in the diagnostic workup in patients with thyroid nodules.


 





[1] FNAB = fine-needle aspiration biopsy


June 2004
E. Eviatar, M. Vaiman, N. Shlamkovitch, S. Segal, A. Kessler and U. Katzenell

Background: The external approach is the golden standard for sinonasal tumor removal but it is associated with several side effects, including facial scars, intracranial and extracranial complications, a long hospitalization period and high costs. Endoscopic sinus surgery enables resection of benign and selected malignant sinonasal tumors and has the advantages of no facial scars, better functional and structural preservation of the sinonasal complex, minimal trauma to surrounding tissue, a shorter hospitalization stay and lower costs.

Objectives: To evaluate the advantages and limitations of endoscopic resection of benign and malignant sinonasal tumors, their recurrence and complication rates.

Methods: The medical and radiology records of 56 patients who underwent endonasal endoscopic resection of benign and malignant sinonasal tumors between 1996 and 2003 were retrospectively reviewed. Tumors located in the center of the nose and sinuses were endoscopically resected.

Results: Six cases of malignant tumor and 50 cases of benign tumor underwent resection by ESS[1]. One of the patients with malignant tumor died, the remainder showing no evidence of disease on follow-up of 3–60 months (mean 26.8 months). Inverted papilloma was the most common benign tumor (40 patients). Seven patients (18%) had recurrence followed by endonasal resection. No major complications were recorded. Hospitalization stay was 2–7 days (mean 3.6 days).

Conclusions: Endoscopic resection of benign sinonasal tumors that are centrally located in the nose and sinuses should be considered before the external approach is used. In very carefully selected cases of malignant tumors ESS is oncologically acceptable, but more experience is needed for discerning the indications for endoscopic resection of malignant tumors. The complication rate for endoscopic resection is low, there are no facial scars, hospitalization stay is short, and costs are low.






[1] ESS = endoscopic sinus surgery


Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel