• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Sun, 26.05.24

Search results


March 2024
Rottem Kuint MD, Henny Azmanov MD, Adi Shalom MD, Neville Berkman MBBCh

Background: Bronchiectasis is an obstructive chronic lung disease characterized by structural changes in large and small airways, namely permanent widening of bronchial lumen resulting in chronic inflammation and infection. Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are environmental mycobacteria that may cause human infection or colonization with over 150 species identified to date. Bronchiectasis with NTM colonization or infection is often encountered but with varying prevalence and unknown clinical or prognostic significance.

Objectives: To find the prevalence of NTM among patients with bronchiectasis in the Jerusalem district. To assess whether there were clinical differences between patients with bronchiectasis who were isolated with NTM and those without.

Methods: In this retrospective observational research study, we reviewed all computerized medical charts of patients over 18 years of age, who were diagnosed with bronchiectasis at Hadassah Medical Centers in Jerusalem between 2012 and 2017. We assessed the prevalence of NTM pulmonary disease. To compare patients with and without NTM, we reviewed and analyzed clinical, radiological, and microbiological data of all NTM patients and a group of controls in a 4:1 ratio.

Results: Prevalence of NTM among bronchiectasis patients was 5.1%, slightly lower than previously reported in Israel. We did not find clinically or radiological significant differences in patients with NTM disease compared to controls. This result included a similar number of exacerbations, hospitalization rates, number of lobes involved, and pulmonary function tests.

Conclusions: Bronchiectasis patients with isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa experienced more exacerbations than patients with other isolates, consistent with previous studies.

June 2021
Amram Kupietzky MD, Elchanan Parnasa MD, Matan Fischer MD, Rottem Kuint MD, and Murad Daana MD
December 2020
Rottem Kuint MD, Polina Cohen Goichman MD, Ahuva Mizrachi MD, Raphael Breuer MD, Avraham Abutbul MD, Neville Berkman MBBCh FRCP, and Zvi Gregorio Fridlender MD

Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD) is a common and debilitating condition, often accompanied by other co-morbidities. The Hadassah Medical Center’smulti-disciplinary approach in treating COPD patients in a one-stop shopfor COPD patients is the first of its kind in Israel. It includes pulmonary physicians, a nurse coordinator, dietitian, psychotherapist, physiotherapist, and a smoking cessation program.

Objectives: To characterize efficacy of such a program in COPD patients

Methods: Demographic and clinical data from patients referred to the Hadassah COPD center, including co-morbidities, baseline symptoms (using the CAT questioner), spirometry results, 6-minute walking distance (6MWD) test and current treatment were collected and compared to the same data after 6–12 months of treatment.

Results: Some 154 patients were evaluated; mean age 64 years; 67% male; 53% current smokers. Only 74% received chronic treatment for COPD. Average body mass index was 28, CAT score 21.3, and mean FEV1 was 1.38 liters (53% of predicted).The mean exacerbation rate during the year prior to referral was 1.72 with a 1.07 annual admission rate. Following treatment, a small increase was noted in FEV1 to 1.47 liters, 54.4% of predicted; improvement in CAT scores to 16.5 with improvement seen in 70% of patients, and a 42 meter increase in the 6MWD (from 344 to 386 meters) with some improvement of effort capacity in 77% of patients. The rate of smokers decreased to 21%, and 97% of patients received medical treatment for COPD.

Conclusions: Multidisciplinary approach is feasible and efficacious in patients with COPD.

September 2014
Menachem Rottem MD and Adham Egbarya BSc

Background: The efficacy of subcutaneous immunotherapy for the treatment of allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, allergic asthma and stinging insect hypersensitivity has been demonstrated in several studies.

Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness and side effects of immunotherapy in Israel and the relationship between local and systemic side effects.

Methods: This retrospective study was based on patient records and a computerized database for drug dispensing over a 5 year period. Success was rated as partial or complete. Side effects were classified as local or systemic. Systemic side effects were further classified according to severity, as mild (cutaneous), moderate (respiratory symptoms), or severe (cardiovascular).

Results: Of the 135 patients on aero-allergen immunotherapy who reached maintenance, 120 (88.9%) exhibited complete or partial improvement and 15 (11.1%) did not improve. All of the 44 patients on hymenoptera immunotherapy reached effective maintenance doses. The mean percent side effects calculated per treatment (injection) were 2.49 for local and 1.58 for a systemic reaction during the build-up phase, and 1.13 and 1.12 during the maintenance phase, respectively. Rates of systemic reactions were 1.3% for cutaneous, 1.14% for respiratory and 0.97% for cardiovascular reactions during the build-up phase, and 1.11%, 0.53%, and 0.51% during the maintenance phase, respectively. The odds of systemic reactions were significantly higher in patients with local reactions both in the build-up phase (P = 0.03) and in the maintenance phase (P = 0.0003). The number of annual medications dispensed per patient decreased from 31.5 to 26.0 during the first year after reaching maintenance, and to 22.5 in the second year. Pharmaceutical costs were 67% lower 1 year after the start of the maintenance phase, compared to the year before the start of immunotherapy, and 63% lower in the second year (P = NS).

Conclusions: Immunotherapy was effective and safe. Recognizing the benefits and safety of immunotherapy is necessary for physicians and health authorities in order to provide better care for allergic patients.

August 2014
Menachem Rottem MD, Ramit Segal MD, Shmuel Kivity MD, Laliv Shamshines MD, Yael Graif MD, Meir Shalit MD, Aharon Kessel MD, Josef Panasoff MD, Shai Cohen MD, Elias Toubi MD and Nancy Agmon-Levin MD

Background: Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is a common, debilitating disease that is frequently resistant to standard therapy. Omalizumab, anti-immunoglobulin-E humanized monoclonal antibody, was recently shown to be effective in treating resistant CSU.

Objectives: To investigated the treatment of CSU with omalizumab in Israel.

Methods: We conducted a multicenter retrospective analysis of patients with refractory CSU treated with omalizuamb in Israel during 2012–2013. Complete improvement was defined as resolution of symptoms with no need for other medications, or satisfactory when patients’ condition improved but required regular or intermittent doses of antihistamines.

Results: Forty-three patients received omalizumab off-label for refractory CSU. Their mean age was 45 ± 12 years and CSU duration was 4.3 ± 4 years. In this cohort, 98% were unsuccessfully treated with high dose H(1)-antihistamines, 88% with systemic glucocorticoids and 30% with cyclosporine and/or other immune-modulators. Fourteen patients received only one injection of omalizumab, while the other 29 received on average of 4.3 ± 3.2 injections; 30 patients received 150 mg/month and 13 received 300 mg/month. Following omalizumab therapy, disease remitted within weeks in 86% of patients, of whom half achieved complete remission. The latter was associated with usage of high dose omalizumab, 300 mg/month vs. 150 mg/month (P = 0.02) and repeated therapy (i.e., multiple injections vs. a single injection) (P = 0.0005).

Conclusions: Omalizumab is an effective and safe treatment for refractory CSU with rapid onset of action for inducing and maintaining remission. Treating CSU patients mandates an individual approach, because while low dose omalizumab will suffice for some patients others might need higher doses and prolonged therapy. 

December 2008
M. Rottem, D. Shostak, S. Foldi

Background: Cow's milk allergy is the most prevalent food hypersensitivity, affecting 2–3% of infants, but it tends to resolve with age. Cow’s milk-specific immunoglobulin E in the serum is an important measure in the diagnosis and follow-up of infants and children with cow's milk allergy.

Objectives: To examine the relation between CmsIgE[1] and the probability of resolution of milk allergy.

Methods: CMsIgE was determined in the serum of 1800 infants and children referred for the evaluation of possible milk allergy. All children with CmsIgE of 1 kU/L or above were followed at the allergy clinic and, according to their condition, underwent milk challenge. The diagnosis of cow's milk allergy was made on the basis of a significant and specific history or a positive oral food challenge. Subsequently, oral tolerance was defined as an uneventful oral challenge.

Results: A total of 135 infants and children had milk-specific IgE greater than 1 kU/L. Forty-one percent of children still had clinical milk allergy after the age of 3 years. Sixty-eight percent of children older than 3 years with persistence of cow's milk allergy had milk-specific IgE > 3 IU/ml before the age of 1 year. Furthermore, 70% of children who at 3 years old had resolved their cow's milk allergy had milk-specific IgE that was lower than 3 IU/ml before the age of 1 year. The positive predictive value of CmsIgE > 3 IU/ml to persistent cow's milk allergy at age 3 years was 82.6% (P = 0.001), with a sensitivity of 67.9% and specificity of 70.4%.

Conclusions: Milk-specific IgE concentration in the first year of life can serve as a predictor of the persistence of milk allergy.

 






[1] CmsIgE = cow’s milk-specific immunoglobulin E


December 2005
M. Rottem, A. Zitansky, Y. Horovits.

Background: In the last decade there has been an increase in asthma morbidity. Hospital admission rates for childhood asthma are influenced by the prevalence of asthma and the quality of asthma care.

Objective: To assess trends in hospital admission and readmission rates for childhood asthma in the Jezreel Valley in Israel in the last decade, and to evaluate the possible effect of changes in asthma treatment upon hospitalization for acute asthma during this period.

Methods: All records from pediatric patients from the central hospital in the Jezreel Valley in northeastern Israel over a 10 year period from 1990 through 1999 who were diagnosed as having asthma were thoroughly reviewed and analyzed for admissions, re-admissions, and treatment before and during admissions

Results: There were 1584 admissions, 1208 were first-time admissions and 374 were re-admissions. The number of first-time admissions increased significantly over time (P < 0.0001), with a significant decrease of re-admissions (P < 0.005); this finding was more significant in children under the age of 8 years (P < 0.005). The length of hospital stay decreased significantly from 3.3 days to 2.7 days (P < 0.002). Significant changes in the use of medications included an increase in inhalant glucocorticoids and a decrease in the use of sodium cromoglycate and theophylline. Controller medication use was concomitant with a significant decrease in the re-admission rates.

Conclusions: The increase in the admission rate and the decrease in the rate of re-admissions and the length of hospital stay probably reflect the increase in the prevalence of asthma and changes in its treatment, respectively. It is essential that asthma be recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and that controller medications be administered to decrease the asthma's severity, morbidity, and resultant hospital admissions.
 

April 2004
M. Rottem, J. Darawsha and J. Zarfin

Background: Atopic dermatitis is a common disease in infants and children and the incidence appears to be rising.

Objectives: To determine the presentation, allergies, and outcome among Israeli infants and children.

Methods: Children with atopic dermatitis referred to the allergy clinic at a regional pediatric center were evaluated for their medical history and their allergy. The allergic assessment was determined by utilizing skin prick tests and/or serum specific immunoglobulin E concentrations. The children were reexamined again for all parameters at the end of the follow-up period.

Results: Forty-six children with atopic dermatitis were studied, 27 males (58.7%) and 19 females (41.3%). A family history of allergy was found in 19 (41.3%). The median age at presentation was 17 months. Of the 46 children 33 (71.7%) revealed an allergy to one or more of the allergens. The most common combination was allergy to food and house-dust mites. The mean follow-up time was 64 months. By the age of 8 years full recovery was seen in 16 patients, half of whom recovered within 3.3 years from the date of presentation. The probability of complete remission was 58%, and for either complete or partial remission 76%. Upon reevaluation at the end of the follow-up period some patients lost their sensitivities, while others, who had been allergic to foods, became sensitive to house-dust mites and/or pollens.

Conclusions: Atopic dermatitis is an allergic problem in the northern region of Israel, as it is in other parts of the world. Food allergy and house-dust mites are major contributors to the evolution of eczema.

Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel