• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Sat, 20.07.24

Search results


October 2014
Carlo Perricone MD, Shunit Rinkevich-Shop PhD, Miri Blank PhD, Natalie Landa-Rouben PhD, Cristiano Alessandri MD, Fabrizio Conti MD, PhD, Jonathan Leor MD, Yehuda Shoenfeld MD FRCP and Guido Valesini MD
February 2010
S. Vinker, E. Zohar, R. Hoffman and A. Elhayany

Background: Most data on the incidence of rheumatic fever come from hospital records. We presumed that there may be cases of RF[1] that do not require hospitalization, especially in countries with high quality community health care. 

Objectives: To explore the incidence and characteristics of RF using community-based data. 

Methods: A retrospective descriptive study was conducted among the members (more than 450,000) of the Clalit Health Services, Central district, during 2000–2005. The electronic medical files of members up to 40 years old with a diagnosis of RF in hospital discharge letters or during community clinic visits were retrieved. Patients with a first episode of RF according to the modified Jones criteria were included.

Results: There were 44 patients with a first episode of RF. All patients were under the age of 29. The annual incidence among patients aged 0–30 years was 3.2:100,000; the highest incidence was among children aged 5–14 years (7.5:100,000), and in males the incidence was 2.26 times higher than in females. The incidence was higher among patients from large families, of non-Jewish ethnicity, and from rural areas. Twenty-five percent of the patients were both diagnosed and treated in an ambulatory care setting.

Conclusions: Although the incidence of RF in the western world and in Israel is low, the disease still occurs and mainly affects children. Any future estimates of disease incidence should take into account that RF is becoming an ambulatorily treated disease.  






[1] RF = rheumatoc fever


August 2004
I. Korn-Lubetzki and A. Brand

Background: In developed countries, the incidence of Sydenham’s chorea, a major sign of rheumatic fever has declined, but outbreaks are still encountered worldwide.

Objectives: To report the characteristics of a cohort of SC[1] patients in the Jerusalem area.

Methods: We conducted a prospective assessment of rheumatic fever and SC between 1985 and 2002. The diagnosis of rheumatic fever was based on the revised Jones criteria. Other etiologies of chorea were excluded. Recurrence was defined as the development of new signs, lasting more than 24 hours and separated by a minimum of 2 months from the previous episode. Patients were followed for 1 to 14 years following the initial SC episode, and at least one year after recurrence.

Results: Among 180 children with rheumatic fever, 24 had SC. Most of them came from large families of Ashkenazi origin. In 19 patients (79%) the chorea was associated with other rheumatic fever signs, while 5 had pure chorea. Due to the systematic use of two-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography, cardiac involvement was detected in 75% of the patients. Ten patients (42%, 7 females) developed 11 recurrent episodes of chorea 3 months to 10 years after the initial episode. At recurrence, chorea was the sole rheumatic sign in all nine patients who recurred once. None of the patients had persistent chorea.

Conclusions: SC is still prevalent in the pediatric population of Jerusalem, and may recur years later. Recognition of the disease and adequate treatment is necessary.







[1] SC = Sydenham's chorea


June 2000
George S. Habib MD, Walid R. Saliba MD and Reuven Mader MD

Background: Acute rheumatic fever is considered a relatively uncommon disease in developed countries. Although cases are encountered in the Nazareth area in Israel, no systematic study of this disease has been done in the last 20 years.

Objective: To study the incidence and characteristics of acute rheumatic fever cases in the Nazareth area during the last decade.

Methods: Cases of acute rheumatic fever diagnosed according to the modified Jones criteria were identified in two hospitals in the Nazareth area during the 10 years. These two hospitals receive about 75% of non-obstetric referrals to the emergency room. Clinical, laboratory and treatment data of these patients were documented and the incidence of disease calculated. The population census in the Nazareth area was obtained from the Central Bureau of Statistics.

Results: Forty-four patients, with a mean age of 18 years, were identified. The mean annual incidence was 5 cases/100,000 population. Arthritis was found in 98% of the patients (migratory in 52%) and carditis in 34%, but only one patient had a subcutaneous nodule, and none had either erythema marginatum or chorea. Only one patient with carditis developed heart failure a few months later due to severe mitral stenosis.

Conclusion: Rheumatic fever in the Nazareth area is still manifest. The mean age of the patients was higher than found previously. In only half of the patients was the arthritis migratory, with other major manifestations of rheumatic fever found only rarely.
 

February 2000
Matti Erlichman MD, Ruth Litt MD, Zachi Grossman MD, Ernesto Kahan MD MPH and IPROS Network

Background: Streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis remains a common illness in children and can lead to serious complications if left untreated.

Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic and management approach of a sample of primary care physicians in the largest sick fund in Israel to streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in children.

Methods: A questionnaire was mailed to all physicians who treat children and are employed by the General Health Services (Kupat Holim Klalit) in the Jerusalem District. The questionnaire included data on demographics, practice type and size, and availability of throat culture and rapid strep test; as well as a description of three hypothetical cases followed by questions relating to their diagnosis and treatment.

Results: Of the 188 eligible physicians, 118 (62.5%) responded, including 65 of 89 pediatricians (73%) and 53 of 99 family and general practitioners (53.5%). Fifty-six physicians (47.4%) had more than 18 years experience, and 82 (70%) completed specialization in Israel.  Mean practice size was 950 patients. Fifty-three physicians (43%) worked in Kupat Holim community clinics, 25 (21%) worked independently in private clinics, and 40 (34%) did both. A total of 91 (77%) had access to laboratory facilities for daily throat culture. The time it took for the results to arrive was 48 to 72 hours.  For the three clinical scenarios, 90% of the physicians accurately evaluated case A, a 1-year-old with viral pharyngotonsillitis, and 100 (85%) correctly diagnosed case C, a 7-year-old with streptococcal infection.  As expected, opinions were divided on case B, a 3-year-old child with uncertain diagnosis.  Accordingly, 75 (65.3%) physicians did not recommend treatment for case A, compared to 109 (92.5%) for case C.  For case B, 22 (19%) said they would always treat, 43 (36%) would sometimes treat, and 35 (30%) would await the result of the throat culture.  For 104 (88%) physicians the antibiotic of choice for case C was penicillin, while only 9 (7.5%) chose amoxicillin. However, the recommended dosage regimens varied from 250 to 500 mg per dose, and from two to four doses daily.  For case C, 110 physicians (93%) chose a 10 day duration of treatment.

Conclusions: The primary care physicians in the sample (pediatricians, general practitioners and family physicians) accurately diagnosed viral and streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis. However, there was a lack of uniformity regarding its management in general, and the dosage regimen for penicillin in particular.
 

Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel