• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Mon, 22.07.24

Search results


January 2024
Ravit Peretz-Machluf MD, Mayan Gilboa MD, Shiran Bookstein-Peretz MD, Omri Segal MD, Noam Regev MD, Raanan Meyer MD, Gili Regev-Yochay MD, Yoav Yinon MD, Shlomi Toussia-Cohen MD

Background: Pregnant women are at higher risk for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Since the release of the BNT162b2 messenger RNA vaccine (Pfizer/BioNTech), there has been accumulated data about the three vaccine doses. However, information regarding obstetric and neonatal outcomes of pregnant women vaccinated with the third (booster) vaccine is limited and primarily retrospective.

Objectives: To evaluate the obstetric and early neonatal outcomes of pregnant women vaccinated during pregnancy with the COVID-19 booster vaccine compared to pregnant women vaccinated only by the first two doses.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of pregnant women who received the BNT162b2 vaccine during pregnancy. Obstetric and neonatal outcomes were compared between pregnant women who received only the first two doses of the vaccine to those who also received the booster dose.

Results: Overall, 139 pregnant women were vaccinated during pregnancy with the first two doses of the vaccine and 84 with the third dose. The third dose group received the vaccine earlier during their pregnancy compared to the two doses group (212 vs. 315 weeks, respectively, P < 0.001). No differences in obstetric and early neonatal outcomes between the groups were found except for lower rates of urgent cesarean delivery in the third dose group (adjusted odds ratio 0.21; 95% confidence interval 0.048–0.926, P = 0.039).

Conclusions: Compared to the first two doses of the BNT162b2 vaccine given in pregnancy, the booster vaccination is safe and not associated with an increased rate of adverse obstetric and early neonatal outcomes.

October 2022
Natav Hendin B.Sc., Raanan Meyer, M.D., Ravit Peretz-Machluf, B.Sc., Ettie Maman, M.D., Micha Baum, M.D.

Background: Gestational hypertensive (GH) disorders remain a major obstetric problem.

Objective: To evaluate the incidence of gestational hypertensive disorders among participants undergoing intrauterine insemination (IUI) after exposure to various levels of sperm from sperm donation (SD).

Methods: A retrospective case-control study was conducted at a single tertiary medical center between 2011 and 2019. Participants conceived via IUI using SD from a single sperm bank and had a successful singleton birth. Group 1 conceived during 1–2 cycles of IUI from the same sperm donor; whereas Group 2 after 3+ cycles.

Results: Overall 171 patients (Group 1 = 81, Group 2 = 90) met inclusion criteria. Participants showed no differences in age, chronic medical conditions, or history of pregnancy complications. The groups differed in gravidity and parity. The factors positively associated with Group 1 included either preeclampsia or GH (11 [13.5%] vs. 1 [1.1%], P = 0.001) and GH alone (8 [9.9%] vs. 1 [1.1%], P = 0.014). Newborns from Group 1 had a statistically significant lower birth weight than those from Group 2 (3003 grams ± 564.21 vs. 3173 grams ± 502.59, P = 0.039). GH was more prevalent in Group 1 (P = 0.008) than a control group of 45,278 participants who conceived spontaneously. No significant differences were observed between Group 2 and the control group.

Conclusions: The incidence of GH and preeclampsia in participants was higher among those exposed to 1–2 cycles than those exposed to 3+ cycles of IUI.

December 2021
Yana Davidov MD, Yeruham Kleinbaum MD, Yael Inbar MD, Oranit Cohen-Ezra MD, Ella Veitsman MD, Peretz Weiss MD, Mariya Likhter MD, Tania Berdichevski MD PhD, Sima Katsherginsky BA, Avishag Hassid MA, Keren Tsaraf MA, Dana Silverberg BSc, and Ziv Ben Ari MD

Background: New direct acting antiviral agent (DAA) therapies are associated with a high sustained virological response rate (SVR) in hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. The understanding of the impact of SVR on fibrosis stage is limited.

Objectives: To determine the effect of treatment with the DAAs on long-term liver fibrosis stages, as determined by shear-wave elastography (SWE) or FibroTest©.

Methods: Fibrosis stage was determined at baseline and at 6-month intervals after end of treatment (EOT), using two‐dimensional SWE or FibroTest©; APRI and FIB-4 scores.

Results: The study comprised 133 SVR12 patients. After a median follow-up of 15 months (range 6–33), liver fibrosis stage decreased by at least 1 stage in 75/133 patients (56%). Cirrhosis reversal was observed in 24/82 (29%). Repeated median liver stiffness SWE values in cirrhotic patients were 15.1 kPa at baseline (range 10.5–100), 13.4 kPa (range 5.5–51) at 6 months, and 11.4 kPa (range 6.1–35.8) at 12 months after EOT, P = 0.01. During the second year after EOT, no statistically significant differences in liver fibrosis stage in 12, 18, and 24 months were found. Splenomegaly was the only significant negative predictor of liver fibrosis regression during all time points of repetitive noninvasive assessment.

Conclusions: Following successful DAA treatment, the majority of our HCV patients with advanced fibrosis demonstrated significant improvement, as assessed by non-invasive methods. Advanced fibrosis stage was a negative predictor of fibrosis regression. Longer follow-up periods are required to further establish the impact of DAAs treatment in HCV patients with advanced fibrosis

September 2021
Roy Croock MD, Jonathan Modai MD, Yuval Avda MD, Igal Shpunt MD, Yaniv Shilo MD, Yamit Peretz MD, Uri Lindner MD, Avraham Bercovich MD, and Dan Leibovici MD

Background: Radical cystectomy is a complicated surgery with significant risks. Complications of Clavien–Dindo grade 3–4 range from 25% to 40% while risk of mortality is 2%. Pelvic surgery or radiotherapy prior to radical cystectomy increases the challenges of this surgery.

Objectives: To assess whether radical cystectomy performed in patients with prior history of pelvic surgery or radiation was associated with increased frequency of Clavien–Dindo grade 3 or higher complications compared to patients without prior pelvic intervention.

Methods: We retrospectively evaluated all patients who underwent radical cystectomy at our center over a 7-year period. All patients with pelvic radiation or surgery prior to radical cystectomy comprised group 1, while group 2 included the remaining patients.

Results: In our study, 65 patients required radical cystectomy at our institution during the study period. Group 1 was comprised of 17 patients and group 2 included 48 patients. Four patients from group 2 received orthotopic neobladder, while an ileal conduit procedure was performed in the remaining patients. Estimated blood loss and the amount of blood transfusions given was the only variable found to be statistically different between the two groups. One patient from group 1 had four pelvic interventions prior to surgery, and her cystectomy was aborted.

Conclusions: Radical cystectomy may be safely performed in patients with a history of pelvic radiotherapy or surgery, with complication rates similar to those of non-irradiated or operated pelvises.

April 2021
Said Abozaid MD, Saray Sity MD, Wael Nasser MD, Avi On MD, and Avi Peretz PhD
March 2020
Elena Fridman MD MSc, Liran Peretz-Aizenman RN MN and Abed N. Azab PhD

Background: Opposition to neonatal Hepatitis B vaccination is a growing trend in Israel.

Objectives: To assess the sociodemographic factors and attitudes associated with non-vaccination of term singleton newborns.

Methods: This prospective, pair-matched, controlled trial was conducted in a tertiary university-affiliated hospital. Data on maternal sociodemographic parameters, delivery, and infant care practices were gathered. Knowledge and references of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination, vaccination schedule, and health government policies were assessed. A follow-up telephone survey was completed at the age of 7 weeks postpartum regarding vaccine catch-up rate.

Results: Mothers in the study group were mostly Jewish white middle class married multiparous women with some higher education. Hepatitis B serology was not tested in most. Higher rates of rooming-in and exclusive breastfeeding were observed. Knowledge about HBV was stated, multiple sources of information were significantly associated with newborn non-vaccination. Many objected to the timing of the vaccine and its necessity. Multiple medical encounters are viewed as missed opportunities.

Conclusions: Multiple sources of vaccine information are associated with non-vaccination. Medical encounters prior and post-delivery should be used for vaccination education and may improve vaccination coverage.

April 2017
Eyal Lotan MD MSc, Stephen P. Raskin MD, Michal M. Amitai MD, Yeruham Kleinbaum MD, Ella Veitsman MD, Peretz Weiss MD, Oranit Cohen-Ezra MD, Tania Berdichevski MD and Ziv Ben-Ari MD

Background: Accurate assessment of liver fibrosis is crucial for the management of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection.

Objectives: To evaluate the performance of liver segment-to-spleen volume ratio in predicting the severity of liver fibrosis.

Methods: Sixty-four consecutive HCV patients were enrolled in this retrospective study. All patients underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and were divided into three groups based on their hepatic fibrosis stage evaluated by shear-wave elastography (SWE): non-advanced (F0–F1, n=29), advanced (F2, n=19) and severe fibrosis (F3–F4, n=16). Using semi-automated liver segmentation software, we calculated the following liver segments and spleen volumes for each participant: total liver volume (TLV), caudate lobe (CV), left lateral segment (LLV), left medial segment (LMV), right lobe (RV) and spleen (SV), a well as their ratios: CV/SV, RV/SV, LLV/SV, LMV/SV and TLV/SV.

Results: RV/SV was found to discriminate between patients with non-advanced and advanced fibrosis (P = 0.001), whereas SV, CV, RV, TLV/SV, LMV/SV and RV/SV discriminated between patients with advanced and severe fibrosis (P < 0.05). RV/SV ≤ 3.6 and RV ≤ 2.9 were identified as the best cutoff values to differentiate non-advanced from advanced fibrosis and advanced from severe fibrosis with sensitivities of 72.2% and 92.7%, specificities of 72.7% and 77.8%, and with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.797 and 0.847, respectively (P ≤ 0.002).

Conclusions: RV/SV may be used for the assessment and monitoring of liver fibrosis in HCV patients prior to the administration of antiviral therapy, considering SWE as the reference method.

 

February 2017
Suleiman Kriem MD, Avi Peretz PhD and Arnon Blum MD
May 2016
Dan Meir Livovsky MD, Orit Pappo MD, Galina Skarzhinsky PhD, Asaf Peretz MD AGAF, Elliot Turvall MSc and Zvi Ackerman MD

Background: Recently we observed patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) or chronic reflux symptoms (CRS) who developed gastric polyps (GPs) while undergoing surveillance gastroscopies for the detection of either esophageal varices or Barrett's esophagus, respectively.

Objectives: To identify risk factors for GP growth and estimate the gastric polyp growth rate (GPGR).

Methods: GPGR was defined as the number of days since the first gastroscopy (without polyps) in the surveillance program, until the gastroscopy when a GP was discovered.

Results: Gastric polyp growth rates in CLD and CRS patients were similar. However, hyperplastic gastric polyps (HGPs) were detected more often (87.5% vs. 60.5%, P = 0.051) and at a higher number (2.57 ± 1.33 vs. 1.65 ± 0.93, P = 0.021) in the CLD patients. Subgroup analysis revealed the following findings only in CLD patients with HGPs: (i) a positive correlation between the GPGR and the patient's age; the older the patient, the longer the GPGR (r = 0.7, P = 0.004). (ii) A negative correlation between the patient's age and the Ki-67 proliferation index value; the older the patient, the lower the Ki-67 value (r = -0.64, P = 0.02). No correlation was detected between Ki-67 values of HGPs in CLD patients and the presence of portal hypertension, infection with Helicobacter pylori, or proton pump inhibitor use.

Conclusions: In comparison with CRS patients, CLD patients developed HGPs more often and at a greater number. Young CLD patients may have a tendency to develop HGPs at a faster rate than elderly CLD patients.

October 2015
Jonathan E. Cohen MD PhD, Yasmin Cohen MD, Tamar Peretz MD and Ayala Hubert MD

Background: Predictive biomarkers for personalized treatment of neoplasms are suggested to be a major advancement in oncology and are increasingly used in clinical practice, albeit based on level II evidence. Target Now® (TN) employs immunostaining and RNA expression on tumor samples to identify potentially beneficial or ineffective drugs. 

Objectives: To explore retrospectively the predictive value of TN for patients with colorectal and gastric carcinomas. 

Methods: The study group comprised colorectal and gastric carcinoma patients with TN test reports. We identified chemotherapy regimens given for stage IV disease for which TN reports indicated prediction. Protocols were classified as having clinical benefit (CB; i.e., stable disease or any objective response) or progressive disease, and this was compared with the TN prediction. 

Results: Nineteen patients – 12 colorectal and 7 gastric carcinomas – met the inclusion criteria. There were 26 evaluable treatment protocols; of 18 with a CB 15 were predicted to have a CB while 3 were predicted to have a lack of CB. Of eight protocols that had no CB, seven were predicted to have a CB and one was predicted to have a lack of CB. A chi-square test was non-significant (P = 0.78). An exploratory analysis yielded a positive predictive value of 68% and a sensitivity of 83% for the TN test. 

Conclusions: This study emphasizes the need for larger multicenter studies to validate the TN test before it is adopted into clinical practice. 

 

July 2014
Arnon Blum MD, Saleh Nazzal MD and Avi Peretz PhD
April 2013
S. Graffi, A. Peretz, H. Jabaly and M. Naftali
Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel