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עמוד בית
Sat, 22.06.24

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June 2015
Yacov Shacham MD, Eran Leshem-Rubinow MD, Arie Steinvil MD, Gad Keren MD, Arie Roth MD and Yaron Arbel MD

Abstract

Background: In the era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI), information on the incidence and prognostic significance of high degree atrioventricular block (AVB) in ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients is limited.

Objectives: To assess the incidence, time of onset, predictors and prognostic significance of high degree AVB in a large cohort of consecutive STEMI patients undergoing PPCI.

Methods: We retrospectively studied 1244 consecutive STEMI patients undergoing PPCI. Patient records were reviewed for the presence of high degree AVB, its time of occurrence and relation to in-hospital complications, as well as long-term mortality over a 5 year period.

Results: High degree AVB was present in 33 patients (3.0%), in 25 (76%) of whom the conduction disorder occurred prior to PPCI. Twelve patients (36%) required temporary pacing, all prior to or during coronary intervention, and all AVB resolved spontaneously before hospital discharge. AVB was associated with a significantly higher 30 day (15 % vs. 2.0%, P = 0.001) and long-term mortality rate (30% vs. 6.0%, P < 0.001). Time of AVB had no effect on mortality. In a multivariate regression model, AVB emerged as an independent predictor for long-term mortality (hazard ratio 2.8, 95% confidence interval 1.20–6.44, P = 0.001).

Conclusions: High degree AVB remains a significant prognostic marker in STEMI patients in the PPCI era, albeit transient.

June 2015
David Rott MD, Robert Klempfner MD, Ilan Goldenberg MD and David Leibowitz MD

Background: While earlier studies indicated that cholesterol levels decrease significantly after an acute myocardial infarction (MI), a more recent study refuted this observation. 

Objectives: To assess changes in plasma lipid levels after onset of acute MI, and determine important predictors of lipid dynamics.

Methods: We prospectively measured lipid levels of patients who presented with an acute MI. Blood samples were drawn on admission to the hospital (day 1), after fasting at least 12 hours overnight (day 2), and on the 4th day of hospitalization (day 4). 

Results: Of 67 acute MI patients, 30 were admitted for ST elevation MI (STEMI) and 37 for non-STEMI. Both total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels decreased significantly (by 9%) in the 24 hours after admission and by 13% and 17% respectively on day 4. High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels as well as triglycerides did not change significantly. Independent predictors of LDL-C decrease were the presence of diabetes mellitus [odds ratio (OR) 6.73, P = 0.01), and elevated cardiac troponin T (cTnT) levels (OR 1.81, P < 0.04).

Conclusions: LDL-C levels decrease significantly after an acute MI. The reduction is correlated with cTnT levels. Diabetes is a strong independent predictor of LDL-C decrease. In acute MI patients only measurements taken within 24 hours of onset should be used to guide selection of lipid-lowering medication.

 

June 2014
Béatrice Brembilla-Perrot MD, Olivier Huttin MD, Bérivan Azman MD, Jean Marc Sellal MD, Jérôme Schwartz MD, Arnaud Olivier MD, Hugues Blangy MD and Nicolas Sadoul MD.
 Background: Programmed ventricular stimulation (PVS) is a technique for screening patients at risk for ventricular tachycardia (VT) after myocardial infarction (MI), but the results might be difficult to interpret.


Objectives: To investigate the results of PVS after MI, according to date of completion.

Methods: PVS results were interpreted according to the mode of MI management in 801 asymptomatic patients: 301 (group I) during the period 1982–1989, 315 (group II) during 1990–1999, and 185 (group III) during 2000–2010. The periods were chosen based on changes in MI management. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors had been given since 1990; primary angioplasty was performed routinely since 2000. The PVS protocol was the same throughout the whole study period.

Results: Group III was older (61 ± 11 years) than groups I (56 ± 11) and II (58 ± 11) (P < 0.002). Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was lower in group III (36.5 ± 11%) than in groups I (44 ± 15) and II (41 ± 12) (P < 0.000). Monomorphic VT < 270 beats/min was induced as frequently in group III (28%) as in group II (22.5%) but more frequently than in group I (20%) (P < 0.03). Ventricular fibrillation and flutter (VF) was induced less frequently in group III (14%) than in groups I (28%) (P < 0.0004) and II (30%) (P < 0.0000). Low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and date of inclusion (before/after 2000) were predictors of VT or VF induction on multivariate analysis.

Conclusions: Induction of non-specific arrhythmias (ventricular flutter and fibrillation) was less frequent than before 2000, despite the indication of PVS in patients with lower LVEF. This decrease could be due to the increased use of systematic primary angioplasty for MI since 2000. 

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