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עמוד בית
Sat, 20.07.24

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June 2020
Lior Leibou MD, Tomer Perlok MD, Rivi Haiat Factor MD, Eyal Leibovitz MD, Jacob Frand MD, Stav Leibou, Dror Sadan MD and Mordechai Shimonov MD

Background: The effect of weight reduction following bariatric surgery is already well known.

Objectives: To investigate the effects of abdominoplasty on metabolic markers indicative of weight loss.

Methods: The authors prospectively enrolled consecutive obese patients after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. They were candidates for post-bariatric surgery abdominoplasty. The authors measured metabolic markers one day prior to surgery, 24 hours after, and 3 months following surgery. They recorded medical and demographic parameters.

Results: Sixteen patients were recruited for participation in the study. Mean age was 47 years and 88% of the patients were female. Bariatric surgery achieved a mean decline in body mass index of 13.8 kg/m2. All patients underwent abdominoplasty. Leptin and insulin levels were slightly increased at 3 months postoperative. No significant changes were observed in glucose, hemoglobin, or triglycerides throughout the study.

Conclusions: In a cohort of obese patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy followed by abdominoplasty, no significant changes were noted in a patient’s metabolic profiles. The results suggest that abdominoplasty has no effect on the metabolic markers tested in contrast to other reports; however, the cosmetic, behavioral, and psychological advantages of abdominoplasty are well established.

February 2007
R. Somech, S. Reif, A. Golander,Z. Spirer

Background: Leptin, a pleiotropic hormone, has been suggested to be part of an acute phase response during an inflammatory stimulus. Its correlation with other acute phase reactants during minor infection in children has not been investigated.

Objectives: To study the correlation between serum leptin levels to those of C-reactive protein, a well-documented acute-phase reactant, in a series of pediatric patients with acute minor infections.

Methods: Leptin and CRP[1] levels were measured in 62 blood samples of pediatric patients presenting with mild febrile illness who were admitted to Dana Children’s Hospital in Israel. All children were finally diagnosed as having minor infection based on the negative blood/urine cultures and favorable outcome.

Results: Serum leptin level was positively correlated with CRP (r2 = 0.5), total white blood cells (r2 = 0.33) and absolute neutrophil count (r2 = 0.31). The regression coefficient was the highest between leptin and CRP.

Conclusions: Circulating leptin concentrations are positively correlated with CRP levels during acute minor infection in children visiting the emergency room for febrile illnesses. Our observation suggests that leptin is indeed a part of acute-phase proteins. The wide scattering showed that it is not a better marker in minor infections than CRP, but it may contribute to weight loss and anorexia seen in the minority of patients during mild infections.






[1] CRP = C-reactive protein


June 2002
Eliezer Golan, MD, Bruria Tal, PhD, Yossef Dror, PhD, Ze’ev Korzets, MBBS, Yaffa Vered, PhD, Eliyahu Weiss, MSc and Jacques Bernheim, MD

Background: Multiple factors are involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension in the obese individual.

Objective: To evaluate the role of a decrease in sympathetically mediated thermogenesis and the effect of the correlation between the plasma leptin and daily urinary nitric oxide levels on obesity-related hypertension.

Methods: We evaluated three groups: 25 obese hypertensive patients (age 45.7±1.37 years, body mass index 34.2±1.35 kg/m2, systolic/diastolic blood pressure 155±2.9/105±1.3, mean arterial pressure 122±1.50 mmHg); 21 obese normotensive patients (age 39.6±1.72, BMI[1] 31.3±0.76, SBP/DBP[2] 124±2.1/85.4±1.8, MAP[3] 98.2±1.80); and 17 lean normotensive subjects (age 38.1±2.16, BMI 22.1±0.28, SBP/DBP 117±1.7/76.8±1.5, MAP 90.1±1.50). We determined basal resting metabolic rates, plasma insulin (radioimmunoassay), norepinephrine (high performance liquid chromatography) in all subjects. Thereafter, 14 obese hypertensives underwent a weight reduction diet. At weeks 6 (n=14) and 14 (n=10) of the diet the above determinations were repeated. Plasma leptin (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and UNOx[4] (spectrophotometry) were assayed in 17 obese hypertensives and 17 obese normotensives, and in 19 obese hypertensives versus 11 obese normotensives, respectively.

Results: Obese hypertensive patients had significantly higher basal RMR[5] and plasma NE[6] levels. Insulin levels were lower in the lean group, with no difference between the hypertensive and normotensive obese groups. At weeks 6 and 14, BMI was significantly lower, as were insulin and NE levels. RMR decreased to values of normotensive subjects. MAP normalized but remained significantly higher than that of obese normotensives. Leptin blood levels and the leptin/UNOx ratio were significantly higher in the obese hypertensive compared to the obese normotensive patients. Both these parameters were strongly correlated to BMI, MAP5, RMR, and plasma NE and insulin .Obese hypertensive patients excreted less urinary NO metabolites. A strong correlation was found between MAP and the leptin/UNOx ratio.  

Conclusions: A reduction of sympathetically mediated thermogenesis, as reflected by RMR, results in normalization of obesity-related hypertension. In contrast, insulin does not seem to play a major role in the pathogenesis of hypertension associated with obesity. Increased leptin levels in conjunction with decreased NO production in the presence of enhanced sympathetic activity may contribute to blood pressure elevation in the obese.

_____________________

[1] BMI = body mass index

[2] SBP/DBP = systolic blood pressure/diastolic blood pressure

[3] MAP = mean arterial pressure

[4] UNOx = urinary nitric oxide

[5] RMR – resting metabolic rate

[6] NE = norepinephrine

March 2002
Alexander Kagan, MD, Nurit Haran, PhD, Ludmila Leschinsky, MD, PhD, Ruty Sarafian, RN, BA, Dan Aravot, MD, Jaffa Dolberg, RN, Ziv Ben-Ary, MD and Jason Rapoport, MB, BS, MRCP

Background: Leptin is a 16 kDa hormone synthesized by adipocytes and involved in body weight regulation.

Objectives: To determine serum leptin concentrations in heart, liver and kidney transplant recipients.

Methods: We investigated 57 patients: 18 male heart transplant recipients (age 25-69 years) at 1-66 months after transplantation, 6 female and 8 male liver transplant recipients (age 33-70) at 11-73 months after transplantation, and 10 female and 15 male kidney transplant recipients (age 20-61) at 3-138 months after transplantation. All recipients were receiving immunosuppressive therapy, including prednisone 0-20 mg/day, azathioprine 75-125 mg/day, cyclosporin 100-250 mg/day or tacrolimus 2-10 mg/day. The results were compared to those of 10 female and 10 male healthy controls. Morning serum concentrations of leptin were measured with a commercial radioimmunoassay (Linco Research Inc., USA), and serum insulin and cortisol levels were measured by radioimmunoassay.

Results: Patients (both men and women) after heart, liver and kidney transplantation exhibited significantly higher serum concentrations of leptin and leptin/body mass index ratios than controls. Serum leptin concentrations were significantly higher in women than in men and correlated very significantly with BMI[1] in all cases. The multivariate stepwise analyses showed that among parameters including BMI, gender, age, time after transplantation, prednisone dose, hematocrit, serum concentrations of glucose, albumin, creatinine, cortisol and insulin, only BMI, gender, cortisol and insulin were significant independent determinants of serum leptin levels in these patients.

Conclusions: This is the first report showing that, in addition to body mass index and gender, basal cortisol and insulin levels affect the hyperleptinemia in transplant patients. The clinical relevance of hyperleptinemia in these patients will require further investigation.






[1] BMI = body mass index



 
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