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עמוד בית
Fri, 21.06.24

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January 2009
A. Dortort Lazar, O. Shpilberg, M. Shaklai and O. Bairey

Background: There is currently no standard salvage chemotherapy for the 40–50% of patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma who fail first-line treatment.

Objectives: To review the experience of a major tertiary medical center with DVIP (dexamethasone, etoposide, ifosfamide and cisplatin) salvage therapy for primary refractory/relapsing NHL[1].

Methods: We reviewed the records of all patients with NHL who received DVIP salvage therapy during the period 1993 to 2005.

Results: We identified 37 adult patients (mean age 56.3 years): 29 with aggressive lymphoma and 8 with indolent lymphoma. Mean event-free survival was 13.5 months (range 0–82 months), mean time between diagnosis and DVIP treatment 18.5 months (range 2–101), and mean number of DVIP cycles 1.9. Four patients (11%) achieved a complete response and 9 (24%) a partial response (overall response 35%). Consolidation with stem cell transplantation was used in 14 patients with aggressive lymphoma and 4 with indolent lymphoma; 14 patients, all with aggressive lymphoma, responded (12 complete, 2 partial). Of the 10 patients who underwent SCT[2] despite no response to salvage DVIP, 6 achieved a complete response. Five year overall survival from diagnosis for the whole sample was 39.4 ± 8.7%, and 5 year post-DVIP overall survival 37.6 ± 8.0%. On multivariate analysis, SCT was the strongest predictor of survival (relative risk 0.73, P < 0.0001) followed by a high score on the International Prognostic Index (RR[3] 3.71, P = 0.032).

Conclusions: DVIP salvage therapy for NHL was associated with a low response rate of 35% but a 5 year post-DVIP survival rate of 37.6%. Patients who are refractory to salvage treatment with DVIP might still be salvaged with SCT.






[1] NHL = non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma



[2] SCT = stem cell transplantation



[3] RR = relative risk



 
July 2008
May 2008
A. Khalaileh, I. Matot, C. Schweiger, L. Appelbum, R. Elazary and A. Keidar

Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is currently considered the gold standard surgical option for the treatment of morbid obesity. Open RYGB[1] is associated with a high risk of complications. Laparoscopic RYGB has been shown to reduce perioperative morbidity and improve recovery.

Objectives: To review our experience with laparoscopic RYGB during a 19 month period.

Methods: The data were collected prospectively. The study group comprised all patients who underwent laparoscopic RYGB for treatment of morbid obesity as their primary operation between February 2006 and July 2007. The reported outcome included surgical results, weight loss, and improved status of co-morbidities, with follow-up of up to 19 months.

Results: The mean age of the 50 patients was 36.7 years. Mean body mass index was 44.7 kg/m2 (range 35–76 kg/m2); mean duration of surgery was 171 minutes. There was no conversion to open surgery. The mean length of stay was 4 days (range 2–7 days). Five patients (10%) developed a complication, but none of them required early reoperation and there were no deaths. Mean follow-up was 7 months (range 40 days–19 months). The excess body weight loss was 55% and 61% at 6 and 12 months respectively. Diabetes resolved completely or significantly improved in all five patients with this condition, as did hypertension in eight patients out of nine.

Conclusions: Laparoscopic RYGB is feasible and safe. The results in terms of weight loss and correction of co-morbidities are comparable to other previously published studies. However, only surgeons with experience in advanced laparoscopic as well as bariatric surgery should attempt this procedure.






[1] RYGB = Roux-en-Y gastric bypass


September 2006
R. Elazary, M. Bala, G. Almogy, A. Khalaileh, D. Kisselgoff, M. Rav-Acha, A.I. Rivkind and Y Mintz
August 2005
R. Elazary, A. Maly, A. Khalaileh, C. Rubinstein, K. Olstain-Pops, G. Almogy, A.I. Rivkind and Y. Mintz
May 2002
Aneta Lazarov, MD, Keren Moss, MD, Natalie Plosk, MD, Mario Cordoba, MD and Liliana Baitelman, Pharm
March 2000
Orna Geyer, MD, Meira Neufelder, MD, Adi Michaeli-Cohen, MD, Moshe Lazar, MD, Sigal Sadetzki, MD and Baruch Modan, MD
February 2000
Rivka Kauli MD, Rina Zaizov MD, Liora Lazar MD, Athalia Pertzelan MD, Zvi Laron MD, Avinoam Galatzer MA, Moshe Phillip MD, Yitzhak Yaniv MD and Ian Joseph Cohen MB ChB

Background: Growth retardation in childhood was only recently recognized as a prominent feature of Gaucher disease type 1, but there are few data on both the pubertal development and the final outcome of growth and sexual maturation.

Objective: To investigate the natural pattern of growth and puberty in patients with Gaucher disease type 1 and the effect of splenectomy and enzyme replacement therapy.

Methods: We retrospectively analyzed growth and puberty in 57 patients with Gaucher disease type 1; 52 were followed since childhood and/or prepuberty and 42 have reached sexual maturity and final height. In the analysis we considered severity of disease, time of splenectomy, and start of enzyme replacement therapy.

Results: Deceleration of growth at age 3–5 years was observed in 30 of 57 patients followed since early childhood while untreated: height-SDS decreased from -0.34±0.42 at age 0–3 years to -1.93±0.95 (P<0.01) at age 7–10 years and was more pronounced with severe disease. A high prevalence (59.6%) of delayed puberty, which was more frequent with severe disease, was observed in 47 patients followed before and throughout puberty. No primary endocrine pathology was found. All patients, untreated as well as treated, with growth and pubertal delay had a spontaneous catch-up, achieved full sexual maturation, and most (83.3%) reached a final height within the range of parental height–standard deviation score. Splenectomy (partial and/or total) performed in 20 patients while still growing had a beneficial effect on growth, which was temporary in some and did not affect puberty. ERT improved growth in 11 patients who started therapy before puberty, as evidenced by a progressive increase in the height-SDS, and seemed to normalize the onset of puberty.

Conclusions: Growth retardation in childhood and delay of puberty are characteristic of Gaucher disease type 1 and are more frequent with severe disease. There is a spontaneous catch-up later in life and most patients reach a final height within their genetic growth potential. Enzyme replacement therapy apparently normalizes growth and possibly also the onset of puberty.

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ERT = enzyme replacement therapy

SDS = standard deviation score

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