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עמוד בית
Sat, 28.01.23

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July 2010
D.I. Nassie, M. Berkowitz, M. Wolf, J. Kronenberg and Y.P. Talmi
February 2010
L. Migirov, G. Borisovsky, E. Carmel, M. Wolf and J. Kronenberg

Background: Severe hearing impairment can have devastating effects on social integration and vocational opportunities.

Objectives: To investigate how well – or poorly – individuals who underwent cochlear implantation as children integrated into the general Israeli hearing community.

Method: We sent a questionnaire to the 30 subjects ≥ 18 years old who underwent cochlear implants our department from 1990 to 2004 when they were < 18 years of age and had used their device for at least 3 years before replying.

Results: Eighteen implant users responded (14 males), yielding a 60% response rate. Their mean age was 13.3 ± 7.0 years (range 6–17) at implantation and 21.1 ± 3.6 years (range 18–34) when they filled in the questionnaire. Five were attending rabbinical school (yeshiva students), four were in regular military service, five were university students (three also held jobs), two were attending high school, one was employed (and had a university degree), and one had left the yeshiva and was unemployed when he returned the questionnaire. Fourteen respondents use the oral communication mode for conversation and the other 4 use both oral and sign languages. Longer daily implant use was significantly associated with coping with the difficulties in the setting in which they were currently active, with a higher level of satisfaction with their current lifestyle and with recognition of the implant’s contribution to this satisfaction (P = 0.037, P = 0.019 and P = 0.001, respectively).

Conclusions: Advances in cochlear implant technologies enable profoundly deaf implanted children to integrate well into the Israeli hearing society, albeit with a large inter-subject variability.

March 2009
L. Migirov, S. Tal, A. Eyal and J. Kronenberg

Background: Aural cholesteatoma is an epidermal cyst of the middle ear or mastoid that can only be eradicated by surgical resection. It is usually managed with radical or modified radical mastoidectomy. Clinical diagnosis of recurrent cholesteatoma in a closed postoperative cavity is difficult. Thus, the accepted protocol in most otologic centers for suspected recurrence consists of second-look procedures performed approximately 1 year after the initial surgery. Brain herniation into a post-mastoidectomy cavity is not rare and can be radiologically confused with cholesteatoma on the high resolution computed tomographic images of temporal bones that are carried out before second-look surgery.

Objectives: To present our experience with meningoceles that were confused with recurrent disease in patients who had undergone primary mastoidectomy for cholesteatoma and to support the use of magnetic resonance imaging as more suitable than CT in postoperative follow-up protocols for cholesteatoma.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of four patients.

Results: Axial CT sections demonstrated a soft tissue mass in the middle ear and mastoid in all four patients. Coronal reconstructions of CT scans showed a tympanic tegmen defect in two patients. CT failed to exclude cholesteatoma in any patient. Each underwent a second-look mastoidectomy and the only finding at surgery was meningocele in all four patients.

Conclusions: Echo-planar diffusion-weighted MRI can differentiate between brain tissue and cholesteatoma more accurately than CT. We recommend that otolaryngologists avoid unnecessary revision procedures by using the newest imaging modalities for more precise diagnosis of the patients who had undergone mastoidectomy for cholesteatoma in the past.
 

October 2007
D.I. Nassie, A. Volkov, J. Kronenberg and Y.P. Talmi
August 2007
M. Wolf, A. Primov-Fever, Y.P. Talmi and J. Kronenberg

Background: Posterior glottic stenosis is a complication of prolonged intubation, manifesting as airway stenosis that may mimic bilateral vocal cord paralysis. It presents a variety of features that mandate specific surgical interventions.

Objectives: To summarize our experience with PSG[1] and its working diagnosis.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of a cohort of adult patients with PGS operated at the Sheba Medical Center between 1994 and 2006.

Results: Ten patients were diagnosed with PGS, 6 of whom also had stenosis at other sites of the larynx and trachea. Since 2000, all patients underwent laryngeal electromyographic studies and direct laryngoscopy prior to surgery. Surgical interventions included endoscopic laser procedures (in 2 patients), laryngofissure and scar incision (in 1), laryngofissure with buccal mucosa grafting (in 3) or with costal cartilage grafting (in 1), laryngofissure with posterior cricoid split and stenting (in 1); one patient was not suitable for surgery. Postoperative follow-up included periodical fiberoptic endoscopies. Voice analysis was evaluated by the GRBAS grading. Seven patients were successfully decannulated within one to three procedures. Voice quality was defined as good in 7 patients, serviceable in 2 and aphonic in 1.

Conclusions: Posterior glottic stenosis may be isolated or part of complex laryngotracheal pathologies. Electromyographic studies and direct laryngoscopy must be included in the diagnostic workup. Costal cartilage or buccal mucosa grafts are reliable, safe and successful with respect to graft incorporation and subglottic remodeling.

 






[1] PSG = posterior glottic stenosis


November 2004
June 2002
Lela Migirov, MD, Ana Eyal MD, and Jona Kronenberg, MD
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