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עמוד בית
Fri, 30.09.22

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November 2016
Igor Sukhotnik MD, Igor Aranovich MD, Bshara Mansur MD, Ibrahim Matter MD, Yefim Kandelis MD and Sarel Halachmi MD

Background: The traditional surgical approach to the excision of persistent urachal remnants is a lower midline laparotomy or semicircular infraumbilical incision.

Objectives: To report our experience with laparoscopic/open urachus excision as a minimally invasive diagnostic and surgical technique.

Methods: This was a retrospective study involving patients who were diagnosed with persistent urachus and underwent laparoscopic/open excision. The morbidity, recovery, and outcomes of surgery were reviewed.

Results: Eight patients (males:females 6:2) with an age range of 1 month to 17 years underwent laparoscopic or open excision (six and two patients respectively). All patients presented with discharge from the umbilicus. Although three patients had no sonographic evidence of a patent urachus, diagnostic laparoscopy detected a patent urachus that was excised laparoscopically. The operative time of laparoscopic surgery ranged from 19 to 71 minutes (the last case was combined with bilateral laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair), and the mean duration of hospital stay was 2.0 ± 0.36 days. Pathological examination confirmed a benign urachal remnant in all cases.

Conclusions: Laparoscopy is a useful alternative for the management of persistent or infected urachus, especially when its presence is clinically suspected despite the lack of sonographic evidence. The procedure is associated with low morbidity, although a small risk of bladder injury exists, particularly in cases of severe active inflammation. 

 

August 2003
S. Luria, L. Kandel, D. Segal, M. Liebergall and Y. Mattan

Background: Revision of total knee arthroplasties are performed with increasing frequency due to the increasing numbers of primary arthroplasties.

Objectives: To retrospectively analyze 71 patients who underwent 78 revision total knee arthroplasties during the years 1991 to 1999

Methods: We evaluated the revised knees using the Knee Society Clinical Rating System after an average follow-up period of 3 years and 9 months (2–10 years). The indications for revision included pain and instability, deep infection of the joint, complaints linked to the patella, or post-trauma to the operated knee.

Results: The average knee score (evaluation of the knee joint itself) calculated after the revision was 74.5. The results on the knee score were excellent (>85) in 48% of patients and poor (<60) in 22%. The functional results (patients’ ability to walk and climb stairs) were only 48.3.

Conclusion: Although the revision of total knee replacements is known to be problematic, most patients show good results on knee examination, and reasonable functional results given the factors involved.

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