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עמוד בית
Sat, 20.04.24

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September 2022
David Segal MD MPH, Nitzan Shakarchy-Kaminsky MD MSc, Yair Zloof MD, Tomer Talmy MD, Galina Shapiro MD PHD, Irina Radomislensky BSc, Avishai M. Tsur MD MHA, Shaul Gelikas MD MBA, Erez Karp MD MHA, and Avi Benov MD MHA; Israel Trauma Group

Background: Medical organizations worldwide aim for equity and diversity in the medical profession to improve care quality. Data on whether the caregiver gender affects outcomes in the prehospital setting are essential but scarce compared to available in-hospital studies.

Objective: To analyze the rates of missed injuries in the prehospital setting and determine whether these rates were associated with the gender of the on-field physician or paramedic.

Methods: A retrospective record review was conducted, which included trauma records documented in two trauma registries, the prehospital Israel Defense Forces-Trauma Registry (IDF-TR), and the in-hospital Israeli National Trauma Registry (INTR). Missed injuries were defined as injuries documented in the INTR but not in the IDF-TR. A multivariable regression analysis was performed to assess the association between provider’s gender and missed injuries.

Results: Of 490 casualties, 369 (75.3%) were treated by teams that included only male paramedics or physicians. In 386 (78.8%) cases, a physician was a part of the prehospital team. In all, 94 (19.2%) casualties sustained injuries that were missed by the prehospital medical team. Missed injuries were not associated with the gender of the paramedic or physician (odds ratio 1.242, 95% confidence interval 0.69–2.193).

Conclusions: No association was found between the gender of the medical provider in the prehospital setting and the rate of missed injuries. These results should encourage prehospital emergency medical systems to aim for a balanced and diverse caregiver population.

September 2019
Oleg Kaminsky MD, Nasser Abdul Halim MD, Veacheslav Zilbermints MD, Eran Sharon MD and David Aranovich MD

Background: Young women concerned about a breast cancer diagnosis will visit breast care centers and request breast cancer screening, including imaging studies, on their initial visit.

Objectives: To explore the role of breast examination and breast ultrasound in self-referred asymptomatic women under the age of 40 years.

Methods: We identified 3524 women under the age of 40 at our medical clinic from 1 January 2010 until 1 June 2014. Of this group, 164 women with above average breast cancer risk were excluded and 233 were excluded because of breast complaints. Of 3127 women, 220 underwent breast ultrasound following the initial visit to the clinic and formed the study group.

Results: Of 220 women evaluated with ultrasound, 68 had prior positive clinical findings. Of this group 8 women had no sonographic findings, and in the remaining 60, a total of 30 simple cysts, 15 fibroadenomas, and 15 suspicious solid masses were identified. One infiltrating ductal carcinoma and one ductal carcinoma in situ were found in a biopsy. The remaining 152 of the 220 total women who underwent breast ultrasound without showing prior physical findings did not require follow-up.

Conclusions: In the absence of clinical findings during physical breast examination, the addition of breast ultrasonography does not provide additional information to supplement the physical examination in self-referred women under age 40 who do not have any major risk factors for developing breast cancer.

February 2005
D. Aranovich, O. Kaminsky and A. Schindel
February 2000
Yehuda Nofech-Mozes MD, Yael Yuhas PhD, Elisabeth Kaminsky MSc, Abraham Weizman MD and Shai Ashkenazi MD MSc

Background: The pathogenesis of neurological symptoms, the most common extraintestinal complication ofchildhood shigellosis, is unclear. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we developed an animal model and demonstrated that TNF alpha and IL-1 beta play a role.

Objectives: To determine whether TNF alpha and IL-1 beta genes are expressed in the brain following peripheral administration of Shigella dysenteriae 60R.

Methods: Expression of mRNA for TNF alpha and IL-1 beta was examined in the brain structures (hypothalamus and hippocampus) and peripheral organs by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, at different time points after intraperitoneal injection of S. dysenteriae sonicate.

Results: In our animal model of Shigella related seizures, TNF alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA were induced in the brain, spleen and liver already 1 hour after injection of S. dysenteriae sonicate. The expression of TNF alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA in spleen, hippocampus and hypothalamus decreased after 6 h and increased again at 18 h post-injection.

Conclusions: Local production of TNF alpha and IL-1 beta in the brain may be involved in the enhanced seizure response of mice after administration of S. dysenteriae. It is possible that intracerebral production of TNF alpha and IL-1 beta plays a role in neurological disturbances of human shigellosis.
 

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