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עמוד בית
Mon, 22.07.24

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February 2019
Sol Jaworowski MBBS FRANZCP, Jean-Louis Golmard MD PhD, Morag Engelberg MD, Sarah Prijs, Lital Twizer, Cornelius Gropp MD and Joseph Mergui MD

Background: A history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) has been linked to a variety of physical and psychiatric illnesses, including ischemic heart disease and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Objectives: To determine the prevalence of past CSA and re-traumatization among hospital psychiatric consultations and to determine whether a CSA group in a hospital setting shared characteristics with community samples described in the literature.

Methods: We divided 228 consecutive psychiatric consultations into two groups. One group comprised patients with a past history of CSA while the other group had no such history. Both groups were further divided into a subgroup that presented with features of re-traumatization.

Results: In the cohort, 38% described a history of CSA. Twenty patients were identified as presenting with features of re-traumatization. There were significant differences between the two groups. The patients with a history of CSA were more likely to have arrived at the emergency department (ED) during the preceding 12 months with a diagnosis of PTSD, personality disorder, and substance use disorder. There was a greater proportion of patients in the CSA group who had grown up in an ultra-Orthodox Jewish household and who currently identified as being secular.

Conclusions: The characteristics of the patients with past CSA in this study are similar to community-based samples, except for a significant gender difference. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate CSA history during hospital ED psychiatric consultations. A history of CSA should be considered during psychiatric consultations in a general hospital ED admission.

September 2018
Joseph Mergui MD, David Raveh-Brawer MD, Meydan Ben-Ishai MD, Sarah Prijs MD, Cornelius Gropp MD, Igor Barash MD MHA, Jean-Louis Golmard MD PhD, Sol Jaworowski MBBS FRANZCP

Background: There is scant research on the psychopathology of Israeli soldiers who present to a general hospital emergency department (ED).

Objectives: To assess the psychopathology among a cohort of Israeli soldiers who presented to a general hospital ED for mental health assessment.

Methods: The demographic and clinical characteristics of 124 consecutive soldiers who presented to the ED for psychiatric assessment between January 2008 and September 2012 were reviewed. Twenty-seven soldiers from the cohort were contacted for follow-up by telephone on average 52 months later.

Results: The reasons for presentation to the ED, usually during the early stages of military service, included self-harming behavior, suicidal ideation, somatoform complaints, and dissatisfaction with their military service. Psychiatric diagnoses included adjustment disorder and personality disorder. Self-harming behavior/suicidal ideation was significantly correlated with unspecified adjustment disorder (P = 0.02) and personality disorder (P = 0.001). At follow-up, there was a lack of substantial psychopathology: none of the subjects engaged in self-harming behavior/suicidal ideation and a consistent trend was observed toward clinical improvement.

Conclusions: Psychiatric intervention of soldiers who present to a general hospital ED because of emotional difficulties may provide the opportunity for crisis intervention and validation of the soldier's distress. To the best of our knowledge this is the first Israeli study of psychopathology among soldiers who presented to an ED.

May 2012
S. Jaworowski, D. Raveh, J.-L. Golmard, C. Gropp and J. Mergui

Background: Alcohol consumption in Israel has increased over the last 20 years. Patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD) who present at a hospital enable early intervention. Objectives: To examine, for the first time, the characteristics of AUD patients in an Israeli general hospital, including whether their alcohol use is documented in their file.

Methods: A group of 178 consecutive patients referred for psychiatric consultation was compared to a second group of 105 hospitalized patients who were not referred. These two groups were studied to compare risk factors for AUD. Patients in both groups were prospectively interviewed using a CAGE questionnaire, demonstrated as an effective screening instrument for AUD. Patients' files in both groups were examined for documentation of alcohol use.

Results: There was no significant difference between the prevalence of AUD in the two groups. The groups were then merged since no significant difference in the risk factor effects between the two groups was found. The risk factors for AUD in the final statistical analysis were lower educational status, living alone, being born in the Former Soviet Union and weaker religious observance. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), cigarette smoking and substance use were found to be independent risk factors. Soldier status was associated with significant alcohol misuse and AUD (CAGE1–4). Alcohol consumption was documented in the files of AUD patients in 48% of the first group and 21% of the second.

Conclusions: Physicians often neglect to take a history of alcohol consumption. Routine use of the CAGEquestionnaire is recommended in Israeli general hospitals. Special attention should be given to PTSD patients and to soldiers.
 

October 2008
J. Mergui, D. Raveh MD, J-L. Golmard, A. Fuer, C. Gropp and S. Jaworowski

Background: General hospital staff are often required to care for physically ill patients who arouse concern regarding risk of harm to themselves or others. Some of these patients will receive one-to-one "constant observation." This is the first Israeli study of general hospital patients with high risk behavior.

Objectives: To examine a population of general hospital patients whose behavioral management required the use of constant observation. Demographic and clinical parameters including physical diagnoses were examined, and risk factors for constant observation were identified. The findings of this study were compared to findings in previous studies.

Methods: This prospective observational study examined 714 inpatients referred for psychiatric consultation; 150 were found to require constant observation, and 156 who did not served as a control group.

Results: In this study younger age, suicidal concerns and alcohol/substance abuse were identified as risk factors for ordering constant observation. Ischemic heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were the only physical diagnoses found to be significantly correlated with a longer duration of observation, regardless of admission duration. Constant observation was less frequently used in the management of organic brain syndrome patients in this study compared to other studies.  

Conclusions: Some of our results (predictive factors for constant observation) confirmed the findings of overseas studies. Our finding that a diagnosis of organic brain syndrome was not a predictive factor for constant observation was unexpected and requires further investigation. The correlation between a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease or COPD[1] and duration of observation has not been reported previously and warrants further studies.  






[1] COPD = chronic obstructive pulmonary disease


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