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עמוד בית
Mon, 15.07.24

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May 2019
Ariel Rokach MD MHA, Ayal Romem MD MHA, Nissim Arish MD, Hava Azulai MD, Chen Chen MD, Milka Bertisch BPT MPE and Gabriel Izbicki MD

Background: Pulmonary rehabilitation has shown significant benefit for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The effect on non-COPD pulmonary patients is less well established.

Objectives: To determine whether pulmonary rehabilitation is also beneficial for non-COPD pulmonary patients.

Methods: Clinical and demographic data on non-COPD pulmonary patients who participated in our institutional pulmonary rehabilitation program between January 2009 and December 2016 were collected. Participants engaged in a 60-minute, twice-weekly, ambulatory hospital-based program lasting 12 to 24 sessions. Sessions included both endurance and muscle training as well as healthy lifestyle educational activities. The six-minute walk test (6MWT) and the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) were conducted before and after the rehabilitation program.

Result: We recruited 214 non-COPD patients, of whom 153 completed at least 12 sessions. Of these, 59 presented with interstitial lung disease (ILD), 18 with non-ILD restrictive lung defects, 25 with asthma, 30 with lung cancer, and 21 with other conditions (e.g., pulmonary hypertension, bronchiectasis) The groups demonstrated significant improvement in 6MWT and in SGRQ scores. Non-COPD patients gained a 61.9 meter (19%) improvement in the 6MWT (P < 0.0001) and 8.3 point reduction in their SGRQ score (P < 0.0001).

Conclusions: Pulmonary rehabilitation is effective in non-COPD pulmonary patients. As such, it should be an integral part of the treatment armament provided to the vast majority of those suffering from chronic respiratory disease.

April 2016
Fabiola Atzeni MD PhD, Elisabetta Grillo MD, Ignazio F. Masala MD, Piercarlo Sarzi-Puttini MD and Gareth T. Jones PhD

Lung involvement is a well-recognized extra-articular manifestation of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Anecdotal reports suggest that the use of anti-TNF drugs may be related to lung disease and pulmonary fibrosis. To examine the association between anti-TNF drugs and the development of lung disease in patients with AS or  psoriatic arthritis (PsA) we conducted a systematic review. Of the 670 papers identified by means of key word and hand search, only one full-text paper was considered potentially relevant but had to be discarded as it did not meet the eligibility criteria. Although no conclusion was reached, this is the first systematic review to examine this problem which is becoming increasingly important as these drugs are widely prescribed in patients with spondyloarthritis.

December 2015
Delfino Legnani MD, Maurizio Rizzi MD, Piercarlo Sarzi-Puttini MD, Andrea Cristiano MD, Tiziana La Spina MD, Francesca Frassanito MD, Airoldi Andrea MD and Fabiola Atzeni MD
 

Background: Interstitial lung involvement is common and potentially limits the quality of life in patients with systemic limited sclerosis (SScl). 


Objectives: To study the lung carbon monoxide diffusion (DLCO) measured during effort in order to identify a possible subclinical impairment.


Methods: We enrolled 20 SScl patients without interstitial lung involement and 20 healthy controls. At enrolment all subjetcs underwent plethysmography, DLCO by single-breath technique and evaluation of pulmonary blood flow (Qc) with the rebreathing CO2 method. Skin involvement in the SScl patients was rated using the modified Rodman skin score (mRSS). During exercise on a cycle ergometer, DLCO, DLCO/alveolar volume (Kco) and Qc were calculated at 25% and 50% of predicted maximum workload (25% pmw and 50% pmw).


Results: At baseline two groups did not differ in age, body mass index, lung function and Qc. In the controls, DLCO, Kco and DLCO/Qc measured at 25% pmw and 50% pmw were significantly higher than in SScl patients, while Qc was not different. Based on response to effort, SScl patients were divided into two groups: responders, with an increase of DLCO25%pmw and DLCO50%pmw at least 5% and 10% respectively, and non-responders. The non-responders showed greater skin involvement and significantly reduced DLCO, Kco and DLCO/Qc values at rest than responders.


Conclusions: Moderate effort in SScl patients may reveal a latent impairment in gas diffusion through the alveolar/capillary membrane, thus confirmig that exertional DLCO can identify lung damage at an earlier stage than DLCO at rest. 


 
March 2015
Alexandra Balbir-Gurman MD, Mordechai Yigla MD, Ludmila Guralnik MD, Emilia Hardak MD, Anna Solomonov MD, Alexander P. Rozin MD, Kohava Toledano MD, Amir Dagan MD, Rema Bishara MD, Doron Markovits MD PhD, Menahem A. Nahir MD and Yolanda Braun-Moscovici MD

Abstract

Background: Scleroderma lung disease (ILD-SSc) is treated mainly with cyclophosphamide (CYC). The effectiveness of CYC was judged after 12–24 months in most reports.

Objectives: To analyze the effect of monthly intravenous CYC on pulmonary function tests including forced vital capacity (FVC) and diffusing lung capacity (DLCO), as well as Rodnan skin score (mRSS), during long-term follow-up.

Methods: We retrospectively collected the data on 26 ILD-SSc patients who began CYC treatments before 2007. Changes in FVC, DLCO and mRSS before treatment, and at 1, 4 and 7 years after completion of at least six monthly intravenous CYC treatments for ILD-SSc were analyzed.

Results: Mean cumulative CYC dose was 8.91 ± 3.25 G. More than 30% reduction in FVC (0%, 8%, and 31% of patients), DLCO (15%, 23%, 31%), and mRSS (31%, 54%, 62%) at years 1, 4 and 7 was registered. During the years 0–4 and 4–7, annual changes in FVC, DLCO and mRSS were 3.2 vs. 0.42% (P < 0.040), 4.6 vs. 0.89% (P < 0.001), and 1.8 vs. 0.2 (P = 0.002). The greatest annual FVC and DLCO reduction over the first 4 years correlated with mortality (P = 0.022). There were no differences in the main variables regarding doses of CYC (< 6 G and > 6 G).

Conclusions: In patients with ILD-SSc, CYC stabilized the reduction of FVC during treatment, but this effect was not persistent. The vascular characteristic of ILD-SSc (DLCO) was not affected by CYC treatment. CYC rapidly improved the mRSS. This effect could be achieved with at least 6 G of CYC. Higher rates of annual reduction in FVC and DLCO in the first 4 years indicate the narrow window of opportunity and raise the question regarding ongoing immunosuppression following CYC infusions.

 

February 2015
Abdulla Watad MD, Marina Perelman MD, Ribhi Mansour MD, Yehuda Shoenfeld MD FRCP MaACR and Howard Amital MD MHA
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