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עמוד בית
Tue, 16.07.24

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April 2024
Dante Antonelli MD, Vladimir Poletaev MD, Vidal Essebag MD, Alexander Feldman MD

Inappropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) shock due to electromagnetic interference (EMI) induced by electrocautery is a well-known theoretical association but is rarely reported [1]. We report a case of EMI induced by electrocautery causing inappropriate ICD shock, underlining that, with the use of monopolar cautery, not only the location of the surgery but also electrodispersive pad (EDP) placement may be important to avoid EMI.

June 2023
Dante Antonelli MD, Vladimir Poletaev MD, Alexander Feldman MD

Inappropriate shocks are a serious and still unresolved problem associated with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) that have been associated with increased mortality and impairment of quality of life [1] despite advances in device safety. We report a case of electromagnetic interference (EMI) while showering that resulted in an inappropriate ICD discharge.

May 2018
Roman Nevzorov MD, Avital Porter MD, Shanie Mostov DVM, Shirit Kazum MD, Alon Eisen MD, Gustavo Goldenberg MD, Zaza Iakobishvili MD, Jairo Kusniec MD, Gregory Golovchiner MD, Boris Strasberg MD and Moti Haim MD

Background: Gender-related differences (GRD) exist in the outcome of patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT).

Objectives: To assess GRD in patients who underwent CRT.

Methods: A retrospective cohort of 178 patients who were implanted with a CRT in a tertiary center 2005–2009 was analyzed. Primary outcome was 1 year mortality. Secondary endpoints were readmission and complication rates.

Results: No statistically significant difference was found in 1 year mortality rates (14.6% males vs. 11.8% females, P = 0.7) or in readmission rate (50.7% vs. 41.2%, P = 0.3). The complication rate was only numerically higher in women (14.7% vs. 5.6%, P = 0.09). Men more often had CRT-defibrillator (CRT-D) implants (63.2% vs. 35.3%, P = 0.003) and had a higher rate of ischemic cardiomyopathy (79.2% vs. 38.2%, P < 0.001). There was a trend to higher incidence of ventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia in men before CRT implantation (29.9% vs. 14.7%, P = 0.07%). A higher proportion of men upgraded from implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) to CRT-D, 20.8% vs. 8.8%, P = 0.047. On multivariate model, chronic renal failure was an independent predictor of 1 year mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 3.6; 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.4–9.5), CRT-D had a protective effect compared to CRT-pacemaker (HR 0.3, 95%CI 0.12–0.81).

Conclusions: No GRD was found in 1 year mortality or readmission rates in patients treated with CRT. There was a trend toward a higher complication rate in females. Men were implanted more often with CRT-D and more frequently underwent upgrading of ICD to CRT-D.

 

December 2015
Yuval Konstantino MD, Tali Shafat BSc, Victor Novack MD PhD, Lena Novack PhD and Guy Amit MD MPH
 

Background: Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduce mortality in patients implanted for primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Data on the incidence of appropriate ICD therapies in primary vs. secondary prevention are limited. 


Objectives: To compare ICD therapies and mortality in primary vs. secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. 


Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of 581 consecutive patients receiving an ICD for primary (66%) or secondary (34%) prevention indications. 


Results: During long-term follow-up, 29% of patients implanted for secondary prevention received appropriate ICD therapy vs. 18% implanted for primary prevention. However, the overall 7 year mortality rate was not significantly different between the two groups (26.9%, P = 0.292). Multivariate analysis showed that patients implanted for primary prevention had a significantly lower risk of appropriate ICD therapy even after adjustment for age, left ventricular ejection fraction < 0.35 and chronic renal failure (HR 1.63, 95%CI 1.10–2.41, P = 0.015).


Conclusions: Patients implanted for secondary prevention were more likely to receive appropriate ICD therapy, with a significantly shorter time period from ICD implant to the first therapy. However, all-cause mortality was comparable between primary and secondary prevention groups. 


 

 
June 2012
P. Codner, R. Nevzorov, J. Kusniec, M. Haim, R. Zabarski and B. Strasberg

Background: Defibrillation threshold (DFT) testing at the time of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) insertion is performed routinely. Recently this practice is being reconsidered due to doubts about its ability to improve ICD efficacy and evidence that survival may not be affected by the test.

Objectives: To compare the outcome of ICD recipients who underwent DFT testing and those in whom no testing was performed.

Methods: A total of 213 eligible patients were implanted with an ICD between 2004 and 2009. DFT testing was performed in 80. We compared total mortality, appropriate and inappropriate ICD shocks, and anti-tachycardia pacing (ATP) events between DFT and non-DFT patients during a follow-up of 2 years.

Results: On comparing the DFT and non-DFT groups, we found a 2 year mortality rate of 7.5% versus 8.3%, respectively (P = 0.8). Furthermore, 20.7% of patients in the DFT group and 12.4% in the non-DFT group had at least one episode of ICD shock (P = 0.15). With regard to ICD treatment (ICD shocks or ATP events), 57.7% in the DFT group and 64.2% in the non-DFT group received appropriate treatments (P = 0.78).

Conclusions: No significant differences in the incidence of 2 year mortality or percentage of ICD treatment emerged between the DFT and non-DFT groups.
 

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