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עמוד בית
Sun, 14.07.24

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January 2022
Yehuda Hershkovitz MD, Yaniv Zager MD, Batia Segal MD, and Yoram Klein MD

Background: Emergency surgical repair is the standard approach to the management of an incarcerated abdominal wall hernia (IAWH). In cases of very high-risk patients, manual closed reduction (MCR) of IAWH may prevent the need for emergency surgery.

Objectives: To evaluate the safety, success rate, and complications of MCR in the management of IAWH conducted in an emergency department.

Methods: The data of all patients who underwent MCR between 2012 and 2018 were retrospectively collected. Patient demographics, presenting symptoms, clinical parameters, and management during the hospitalization were retrieved from the medical charts.

Results: Overall, 548 patients underwent MCR during the study period. The success rate was 25.4% (139 patients). One patient had a complication that required a laparotomy 2 days after his discharge. A recurrent incarceration occurred in 23%, 60% of them underwent successful repeated MCR and the others underwent emergency surgery. Six patients (1.4%) had a bowel perforation after a failed MCR.

Conclusions: MCR can be performed safely in the emergency department and should be consider as an option to treat IAWH, especially in high operative risk patients

June 2020
Veacheslav Zilbermints MD, Oren Israeli MD, Binyamin Ben Abraham MD, Tuvia Ben-Gal MD, Victor Rubchevsky MD, Dan Aravot MD, Hanoch Kashtan MD, Nikolai Menasherov MD and David Aranovich MD

Background: Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are used more commonly in patients with advanced-stage heart failure. Some of these patients may require elective or urgent abdominal surgical procedures.

Objectives: To determine the outcomes of the management of LVAD-supported patients who underwent elective and urgent abdominal surgical procedures in our institution.

Methods: A retrospective review was conducted on 93 patients who underwent LVAD implantation between August 2008 and January 2017. All abdominal surgeries in these patients were studied, and their impact on postoperative morbidity and mortality was evaluated.

Results: Ten patients underwent abdominal surgical procedures. Of these procedures, five were emergent and five were elective. The elective cases included one bariatric surgery for morbid obesity, one hiatal hernia repair, two cholecystectomies, and one small bowel resection for a carcinoid tumor. The emergency cases included suspected ischemic colitis, right colectomy for bleeding adenocarcinoma, laparotomy due to intraabdominal bleeding, open cholecystectomy for gangrenous cholecystitis, and laparotomy for sternal and abdominal wall infection. All patients undergoing elective procedures survived. Of the five patients who underwent emergency surgery, three died (60%, P = 0.16) and one presented with major morbidity. One of the two survivors required reintervention. In total, 12 interventions were performed on this group of patients.

Conclusions: It is safe to perform elective abdominal procedures for LVAD-supported patients. The prognosis of these patients undergoing emergency surgery is poor and has high mortality and morbidity rates.

June 2018
Osher Cohen MD, Arthur Baazov MD, Inbal Samuk MD, Michael Schwarz MD, Dragan Kravarusic MD1 and Enrique Freud MD

Background: Wandering spleen is a rare entity that may pose a surgical emergency following torsion of the splenic vessels, mainly because of a delayed diagnosis. Complications after surgery for wandering spleen may necessitate emergency treatment.

Objectives: To describe the clinical course and treatment for children who underwent emergency surgeries for wandering spleen at a tertiary pediatric medical center over a 21 year period and to indicate the pitfalls in diagnosis and treatment as reflected by our experience and in the literature.

Methods: The database of a tertiary pediatric medical center was searched retrospectively for all children who underwent emergency treatment for wandering spleen between 1996 and 2017. Data were collected from the medical files. The relevant literature was reviewed.

Results: Of ten patients who underwent surgery for wandering spleen during the study period, five underwent seven emergency surgeries. One patient underwent surgery immediately at initial presentation. In the other four, surgical treatment was delayed either due to misdiagnosis or for repeated imaging studies to confirm the diagnosis. Emergency laparotomy revealed an ischemic spleen in all patients; splenectomy was performed in two and the spleen was preserved in three. Four of the seven emergency operations were performed as the primary surgery and three were performed to treat complications.

Conclusions: Wandering spleen should ideally be treated on an elective or semi-elective basis. Surgical delays could be partially minimized by a high index of suspicion at diagnosis and by eliminating unnecessary and time-consuming repeated imaging studies.

April 2018
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