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עמוד בית
Wed, 17.07.24

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January 2020
Ophir Ilan MD PhD, Yuval Tal MD PhD, Alon Y. Hershko MD PhD, Oded Shamriz MD, Emilie Bohbot MD, Shay Tayeb PhD, Daphna Regev M.Sc, Amos Panet PhD and Ron Eliashar MD

Background: Nasal polyps are three-dimensional structures arising from the mucosa of the upper airway. Due to their complexity, the reliability of single-layer cell cultures and animal systems as research models is limited.

Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of an ex vivo organ culture of human polyps, preserving tissue structure and function.

Methods: Nasal polyps were excised during routine endoscopic sinus surgery for chronic rhinosinusitis and polyposis. Fresh tissue samples were used for pathological evaluation and for the preparation of 250–500 µm sections, which were incubated in culture media. Tissue viability was assessed by visualisation of cilia motility, measurement of glucose uptake, and an infectivity assay. Cytokine secretion was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction before and after the introduction of steroids.

Results: Polyp tissue viability was retained for 2–3 days as demonstrated by cilia motility, glucose uptake and preserved cellular composition. Tissue samples maintained their capacity to respond to infection by herpes simplex virus 1 and adenovirus. Introduction of dexamethasone to cultured tissue samples led to suppression of interferon-g production.

Conclusions: The ex vivo nasal polyp organ culture reproduces the physiological, metabolic, and cellular features of nasal polyps. Furthermore, it shows a preserved capacity for viral infection and response to drugs. This system is a useful tool for the investigation nasal-polyps and for the development of novel therapies.

June 2014
Ephraim Eviatar MD, Koby Pitaro MD, Haim Gavriel MD and Daniel Krakovsky MD

Background: Over the past 20 years, advances in endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) techniques have led to widespread applications of this technology in both adult and pediatric populations with better results and lower morbidity.

Objectives: To update data regarding the rate of minor and major complications following ESS procedures that used powered instrumentation.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of all patients who, with general anesthesia, underwent ESS utilizing powered instrumentation between January 1996 and December 2006. Age, gender, indication for surgery, length of hospitalization, and type and rate of surgical complications were recorded.

Results: A total of 1190 patients were included in our study (1309 surgeries). The male:female ratio was 1.7:1.0 and the average age was 39 years (range 4–86 years). The most common indication for surgery was chronic rhinosinusitis. The rate of major complications was 0.31% and that of minor complications 1.37%. The only major complication that occurred was cerebrospinal fluid leak. The minor complications included epistaxis, periorbital emphysema, ecchymosis and mucocele formation.

Conclusions: Compared to previously published series, the rate of major and minor complications in our study was low. The results indicate that the use of powered instruments during ESS is safe.

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