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עמוד בית
Thu, 18.07.24

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December 2015
Eleonora Plotkin MD, Sydney Benchetrit MD, Tanya Zahavi MD, Oded Kimhi MD and Ze'ev Korzets MBBS
December 2013
Daniel Silverberg, Tal Yalon, Uri Rimon, Emanuel R. Reinitz, Dmitry Yakubovitch, Jacob Schneiderman and Moshe Halak
 Background: Peripheral arterial occlusive disease is common in patients with chronic renal failure requiring dialysis. Despite the increasing use of endovascular revascularization for lower extremity ischemia, the success rates of treating lower extremity ischemia in this challenging population remain obscure. 

Objectives: To assess the results of endovascular revascularization for lower extremity ischemia in dialysis patients.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of all dialysis patients who underwent endovascular treatment for critical limb ischemia (CLI) in our institution between 2007 and 2011. Data collected included comorbidities, clinical presentation, anatomic distribution of vascular lesions, amputation and survival rates.

Results: We identified 50 limbs (41 patients). Indications included: gangrene in 22%, non-healing wounds in 45%, rest pain in 31%, and debilitating claudication in 4%. Mean follow-up was 12 months (1–51 months). Nineteen patients required amputations. Freedom from amputation at 5 years was 40%. Factors associated with amputation included non-healing wounds or gangrene (68% and 36% respectively) and diabetes (P < 0.05). The survival rate was 80% after 5 years.

Conclusions:  Despite improvement in endovascular techniques for lower extremity revascularization, the incidence of limb salvage among dialysis patients remains poor, resulting in a high rate of major amputations. 

March 2002
Alfred Drukker, MD, PhD

Recent data have shed significant new light on the structural and functional development of the kidneys, as well as on a rare congenital form of bilateral renal hypoplasia called congenital oligomeganephronia. In this renal disorder, few greatly enlarged and hard-working nephrons are found that will ultimately sclerose and lead to end-stage renal failure during early childhood. At the same time it has been recognized that the number of nephrons in the kidneys of various animal species and humans is correlated to renal mass. Therefore, premature babies and/or infants small for gestational age due to intrauterine malnutrition will be born with relatively small kidneys and a certain nephron deficit, a condition called congenital oligonephropathy. Extensive worldwide epidemiologic studies have now shown that these premature or SGA[1] infants have a high incidence of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes and renal failure in adulthood. Although the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for these complications of premature birth are not entirely understood, it has become clear that the described association may pose a possible health problem in the adult population. This review describes the background of COMN[2] and CON[3] as well as the evidence that has accumulated on the adult complications of the latter. In addition, some thoughts are presented on the importance of identifying subjects possibly affected by CON, such that early recognition may alter the ultimate outcome.

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[1] SGA = small for gestational age

[2] COMN = congenital oligomeganephronia

[3] CON = congenital oligonephropathy


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