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עמוד בית
Mon, 28.11.22

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November 2013
E. Ganelin-Cohen and A. Ashkenasi
 There is a well-established correlation between sleep disturbances and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A large number of pediatric patients diagnosed with ADHD have sleep problems, while patients with sleep disturbances often display behavioral patterns that resemble some features of ADHD. Despite these observations, the relationship between sleep problems and ADHD is not yet fully understood. It is often difficult to pinpoint which of the disorders is the primary and which a byproduct of the other. A complicating factor is that stimulant medication such as methylphenidate, a drug of choice for ADHD, may adversely affect sleep quality in ADHD patients. However, there have also been reports that it may actually improve sleep quality. This review examines the latest trends in the contemporary literature on this clinical dilemma.

August 2013
M. Drendel, E. Carmel, P. Kerimis, M. Wolf and Y. Finkelstein
 Background: Cricopharyngeal achalasia (CA) is a rare cause of dysphagia in children presenting with non-specific symptoms such as choking, food regurgitation, nasal reflux, coughing, recurrent pneumonia, cyanosis, and failure to thrive. It results from failure of relaxation of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) and may appear either as an isolated lesion or in conjunction with other pathologies. Recognition and early diagnosis of this condition may minimize children's morbidity.

Objectives: To evaluate the clinical course of four children with cricopharyngeal achalasia presenting to our clinic.

Methods: We conducted a 5 year retrospective chart review in a tertiary referral center.

Results: Four children were diagnosed with primary cricopharyngeal achalasia between 2006 and 2010. Diagnosis was established by videofluoroscopy and all underwent uneventful cricopharyngeal myotomy. Three children recovered completely and one child showed partial improvement. For residual UES spasm in a partially improved patient, botulinum toxin was injected into the UES which led to further improvement. Dysphagia recurred in one child who was successfully treated with botulinum toxin injection.

Conclusions: Cricopharyngeal myotomy is a safe procedure in infants and young children. Botulinum toxin injection of the UES was found to be effective in refractory cases. 

July 2013
G. Korchia, Y. Amitai, G. Moshe, L. Korchia, A. Tenenbaum, J. Rosenblum and A. Schechter

Background: Hypovitaminosis D is common worldwide, even in sunny regions.

Objectives: To assess the prevalence and determinants of vitamin D deficiency in toddlers.

Methods: A cross-sectional prospective study was conducted in healthy Jewish children aged 1.5–6 years at five primary care pediatric clinics in the Jerusalem area during the period October 2009 to November 2010. Parents were interviewed regarding personal and demographic data and sun exposure. Blood samples were obtained for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25-OHD] level. Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were defined as 25-OHD < 20 ng/ml and < 30 ng/ml, respectively.

Results: Of 247 children studied, 188 (76%) were ultra-Orthodox and 59 (24%) were Orthodox, traditional or secular. Mean (± SD) 25-OHD level was 25.7 ± 10 ng/ml. Only 73 children (29.6%) had sufficient 25-OHD levels, 104 (42.1%) had insufficiency, and 70 (28.3%) had 25-OHD deficiency. The difference between ultra-Orthodox and others was insignificant (25 ± 10 vs. 27.8 ± 10.5 ng/ml respectively, P = 0.062). Children aged 1.5–3 years had higher 25-OHD levels than those aged 3–6 years (28.6 ± 10.7 and 24 ± 9.2 ng/ml respectively, P < 0.001). Vitamin D deficiency was more common in winter (53%) and autumn (36%) than in summer (19%) and spring (16%). Toddlers attending long-day kindergartens had higher 25-OHD level than those staying at home or at short-day kindergartens (28.8 ± 11.5 and 24.7 ± 9.6 ng/ml respectively, P < 0.05).

Conclusions: A high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was found in toddlers in our study, mainly in older children and in the winter and autumn. We recommend routine supplementation of vitamin D for children beyond the agear.

June 2013
A. Hilmi, Y. Pasternak, M. Friger, N. Loewenthal, A. Haim and E. Hershkovitz
 Background: The existent glycemic control of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients in daily practice might not reach the goals determined in guidelines. Ethnic diversity was also shown to influence glycemic control.

Objectives: To evaluate glycemic control, prevalence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) at presentation, diabetic complications rate, and associated autoimmune diseases in a pediatric T1DM patient population in the Negev area.

Methods: Clinical and demographic details of 168 T1DM patients were evaluated, including HbA1C levels, long-term complications, related autoimmune diseases, and insulin pump usage. The data were analyzed and the Jewish and Bedouin patient groups compared.

Results: Only 13.1% of the patients had reached the HbA1C levels recommended by the current guidelines at the first and second year follow-up visits, and 9.5% and 7.1% at the third and fourth year visits, respectively. A significant difference in HbA1c levels between Jewish and Bedouin patients was found (P = 0.045 at the first year follow-up, P ≤ 0.01 thereafter). Significant difference was found between the Jewish and the Bedouin groups regarding presentation with DKA, 33% and 56% of the patients respectively (P = 0.01).

Conclusions: Existent glycemic control in daily practice is far from the guideline goals. Bedouin ethnicity was associated with less favorable diabetes control, emphasizing the need for better awareness of T1DM and its treatment options in this population. More resources should be directed to address T1DM in the general population, especially among the Bedouin.

 

August 2012
A. Ballin, Y. Senecky, U. Rubinstein, E. Schaefer, R. Peri, S. Amsel, M. Vol, Y. Amit and M. Boaz

Background: The pathogenesis of anemia associated with acute infection in children has not been well delineated.

Objectives: To characterize this type of anemia in children with acute infection, mainly in relation to iron status.

Methods: These two cross-sectional studies compared the prevalence and severity of anemia between outpatient febrile children and age-matched non-febrile controls.

Results: In part 1 of the study, children with acute infection (n=58) had a significant decrease in hemoglobin levels compared with 54 non-febrile controls. Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) did not change this association. Moreover, there was no significant difference in MCV, mean cell hemoglobin or red cell distribution width values between the two groups. Regarding part 2, of the 6534 blood counts obtained in community clinics, 229 were defined as “bacterial infection.” Chart survey confirmed this diagnosis. White blood cell level was significantly inversely associated with hemoglobin level (r = -0.36, P < 0.0001). Anemia was significantly more prevalent among children with bacterial infection compared to those without: 21.4% vs. 14.1% (P = 0.002). Mean values of iron status parameters were all within normal limits.

Conclusions: Acute illness is associated with anemia. The pathogenesis of this anemia does not appear to be associated with disruption of iron metabolism.

May 2012
A. Zamora-Ustaran, R.O. Escarcega-Alarcón, M. Garcia-Carrasco, E. Faugier, S. Mendieta-Zeron, C. Mendoza-Pinto, Á. Montiel-Jarquin, M. Muñoz-Guarneros, A. Lopez-Colombo and R. Cervera

Background: Data on pediatric antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are very sparse.

Objectives: To describe the main clinical characteristics, laboratory data and complications of pediatric APS patients, and to analyze the differences between primary APS and APS associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed clinical and laboratory data of 32 children at “Federico Gomez,” the children’s hospital of México. Nineteen patients had SLE, 12 (37.5%) had primary APS and 1 (3%) had immune thrombocytopenic purpura. We collected information on sociodemographic variables, vaccinations, age at onset, and family history of rheumatic disease, hematological disorders, skin disorders and non-thrombotic neurological disorders. Immunological features included immunoglobulin (Ig) G and M aCl antibodies, IgG and IgM b2 glycoprotein I, lupus anticoagulant, anti-dsDNA and antinuclear antibodies.

Results: The patients included 24 females and 8 males. The most common thrombotic events were small vessel thrombosis (44%), venous thrombosis (28%) mainly deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in lower extremities, and arterial thrombosis (25%). The most common clinical non-thrombotic manifestations were hematological (53%) and neurological disorders (22%). There were no significant differences between groups with regard to the site of thrombosis, non-thrombotic clinical manifestations or laboratory features.

Conclusions: There were some important differences between the clinical manifestations of APS in children compared with adults, but we found no significant differences between patients with primary and APS associated with SLE. Larger studies in Latin American APS children are necessary to determine whether there are differences between ethnic groups.

 


April 2012
A. Achiron, B.-Z. Garty, S. Menascu, D. Magalashvili, M. Dolev, B. Ben-Zeev and O. Pinhas-Hamiel
Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) occurs in young adults and infrequently appears in childhood.

Objectives: To determine the incidence of MS and describe the clinical, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings at onset MS in children in Israel.

Methods: Incidence and case-specific data were obtained through the MS Center Database and Israeli Health Statistics Census Data over 15 years, from 1995 to 2009, and compared between patients with childhood (< 12 years), juvenile (> 12 years, < 18 years) and adult (> 18 years) onset MS.

Results: Of 1129 eligible MS patients, we identified 10 (0.89%) with childhood-onset MS, 74 (6.55%) with juvenile-onset MS, and 1045 (92.56%) with adult-onset MS. There were 0 to 3 incident childhood cases/year, leading to an annual incidence of 0.1/100,000 among Israeli children the incidence of juvenile and adult MS was 2.6 and 5.4/100,000, respectively. Neurological presentation among children with MS was optic neuritis, motor weakness or brainstem involvement. CSF oligoclonal immunoglobulin (IgG) were positive in 62.5%. The most frequent MRI finding was the occurrence of ¡Ý 3 periventricular white matter lesions followed by corpus callosum lesions, with 71% co-occurrence. Cervical and thoracic lesions occurred in 33% and 43%, respectively. Time to second neurological event ranged from 0.3 to 4.2 years and none of the patients with childhood MS reached EDSS=6.0 within a mean follow-up period of 8.4 years.

Conclusions: Childhood-onset MS is rare, with an incidence of 0.1/100,000 Israeli children. Childhood MS does not differ significantly from juvenile and adult-onset MS in terms of clinical, laboratory and imaging findings.
January 2012
Mauro Calvani, MD, Iride Dello Iacono, MD, Valentina Giorgio, MD, Stefano Miceli Sopo, Valentina Panetta, MD and Salvatore Tripodi, MD.

Background: The diagnostic gold standard for food allergy is an oral food challenge (OFC) with the suspected food. Usually, an OFC is stopped at the onset of mild objective symptoms for fear of severe reactions. However, there is no consensus on this issue.

Objective: To investigate the effectiveness and side effects of a new model of oral milk challenge in order to increase the diagnostic accuracy of cow¡¯s milk protein allergy and reduce the number of many useless elimination diets. This model is characterized by a conservative diagnostic protocol and ¡°step-up cow’s milk administered dosing.¡± The secondary aim was to investigate possible factors influencing severe reactions.   

Methods: Sixty-six children (median age 1 year, range 1¨C18) with suspected immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated cow’s milk allergy performed a conservative oral food challenge (OFC), i.e., the OFC was continued even in the presence of subjective, even repeated, or mild local or multiple organ objective symptoms. If the first objective reaction occurred when the quantity of milk was > 10 ml, the investigator would decide whether to continue the OFC or prescribe a gradual increase in milk feeding at home.

Results: Symptoms developed during the OFC in 42.4% of the children. Local, generalized and severe generalized reactions developed in 11 (16.7%), 11 (16.7%) and 6 (9.1%) children, respectively. Only 14/28 (50%) who developed objective symptoms during the OFC were considered to be affected by cow’s milk allergy. In the remaining 14 both subjective and objective symptoms developed and the OFC was continued without the emergence of additional symptoms. Epinephrine was administered to 6 of the 28 children (21.4%) who developed objective symptoms. All but one had subjective symptoms following the early doses of milk, whereas all children who later tolerated milk had their first subjective or mild symptoms following doses ¡Ý 10 ml.

Conclusions: This new model of oral milk challenge criteria led to frequent severe allergic reactions hence its use in daily practice seems inadvisable. However, our study provides evidence that a severe allergic reaction does not invariably occur if the offending food continues to be administered after the onset of symptoms. If mild symptoms appear at doses higher than 10 ml, continued milk administration, on the same day or in subsequent days, seems to facilitate the development of tolerance and may reduce the number of useless elimination diets.


Pedro Ojeda, MD, MPH, Isabel Ojeda, MD, Gema Rubio, MD and Fernando Pineda, PhD.

Background: In the last decade the use of different types of oral immunotherapy for food-allergic patients has increased with generally satisfactory outcomes. Cow’s milk and hen’s egg, a common element in the daily diet, have received the main interest. Most of these immunotherapy regimens are performed in the hospital, causing inconvenience for both children and their parents.

Objectives: To assess the efficacy and safety of a home-based oral immunotherapy regimen with raw pasteurized egg.

Methods: The study group comprised children aged 6 years and older with allergy to hen’s egg proteins, proven by positive skin prick-tests (SPT) and/or specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE) and positive open oral food challenge (OOFC) with boiled or raw egg. Patients who met the inclusion criteria and signed the informed consent form underwent egg immunotherapy according to an established schedule.

Results: The treatment was given to 31 of the 36 recruited patients: 80.6% of the intention to treat population achieved complete tolerance to the maximum dose equivalent to one raw hen’s egg, 3.2% achieved incomplete tolerance, and 16.2% did not achieve an acceptable tolerance dose. Most of the latter patients had a positive baseline OOFC with low doses of boiled egg. The average number of reactions per treated patient was 5.8, most of them grades 1 and 2 there were no grade 4 reactions.

Conclusions: This home-based oral immunotherapy protocol proved to effectively induce tolerance to hen’s egg in most of the egg-allergic children and its safety profile was acceptable.

Silvia Sanchez-Garcia, MD, Pablo Rodriguez del Rio, MD, Carmelo Escudero, MD, Cristina Garcia-Fernandez, MD, Antonio Ramirez, MD and M.D. Ibanez, MD, PhD

Background: In the last two decades milk oral immunotherapy has gained interest as an effective treatment option for milk-allergic patients.

Objectives: To report on the efficacy of a milk oral immunotherapy.

Methods: Children with immunoglobulin E-mediated cow’s milk allergy were included in the protocol. The treatment consisted of an induction phase in which milk doses were increased weekly in the hospital, while the tolerated dose was continued daily at home. The goal was to achieve a minimum milk intake of 200 ml a day. During the maintenance phase, patients ingested at least 200 ml of milk in a single dose every day.

Results: The protocol was applied to 105 milk-allergic children diagnosed by specific IgE to milk and controlled oral food challenge. The mean duration of the induction phase was 19 weeks. Of the 105 subjects, 86 (81.9%) successfully complied with the protocol and 19 (19.1%) failed. Causes of failure were moderate/severe reactions in 12 patients (12.44%) and personal reasons in 7 (6.66%). A total of 182 adverse reactions occurred during the induction phase, most of them mild. Baseline specific IgE to milk and casein were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the successfully treated group compared to the group in which the treatment failed.

Conclusions: Milk oral immunotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for milk-allergic children, although adverse reactions may occur. Baseline milk and casein-specific IgE may be useful to predict a good response to milk oral immunotherapy.

______

[1] IgE = immunoglobulin E

September 2011
E. Lahat, E. Heyman, A. Livne, M. Goldman, M. Berkovitch and D. Zachor

Background: Several studies have suggested that iron deficiency may be related to the pathophysiology of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) due to the role of iron in the production of dopamine and noradrenaline.

Objectives: To evaluate the status of iron deficiency in ADHD children, using ferritin levels, a reliable measure of iron storage in body tissue, as an iron status marker, and to investigate a possible correlation between ferritin levels and the diagnosis of ADHD.

Methods: The study group included 113 newly referred ADHD children aged 5–15 years (mean age 8.8 ± 2.7).

Results: Ferritin levels were below 20 ng/ml in 67 children (59%) and above 20 ng/ml in 45 (41%). There was a very low inverse statistical correlation between scores on Conners’ Rating Scale and ferritin levels, probably without clinical significance. 

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that low iron stores may be related to ADHD pathophysiology; therefore, ferritin should be included in the overall evaluation of children with ADHD.

 
 

I.N. Kochin, T.A Miloh, R. Arnon, K.R. Iyer, F.J Suchy and N. Kerkar

Background: Primary liver masses in children may require intervention because of symptoms or concern about malignant transformation.

Objectives: To review the management and outcomes of benign liver masses in children. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of children with liver masses referred to our institution during the period 19972009.

Results: Benign liver masses were identified in 53 children. Sixteen of these children (30%) had hemangioma/infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma (IHH) and 15 (28%) had focal nodular hyperplasia. The remainder had 6 cysts, 4 hamartomas, 3 nodular regenerative hyperplasia, 2 adenomas, 2 vascular malformations, and one each of polyarteritis nodosa, granuloma, hepatic hematoma, lymphangioma, and infarction. Median age at presentation was 6 years, and 30 (57%) were female. Masses were initially noticed on imaging studies performed for unrelated symptoms in 33 children (62%), laboratory abnormalities consistent with liver disease in 11 (21%), and palpable abdominal masses in 9 (17%). Diagnosis was made based on characteristic radiographic findings in 31 (58%), but histopathological examination was required for the remaining 22 (42%). Of the 53 children, 27 (51%) were under observation while 17 (32%) had masses resected. Medications targeting masses were used in 9 (17%) and liver transplantation was performed in 4 (8%). The only death (2%) occurred in a child with multifocal IHH unresponsive to medical management and prior to liver transplant availability.

Conclusions: IHH and focal nodular hyperplasia were the most common lesions. The majority of benign lesions were found incidentally and diagnosed radiologically. Expectant management was sufficient in most children after diagnosis, although surgical intervention including liver transplant was occasionally necessary.
 

August 2011
A. Fattal-Valevski, H. Bassan, J. Bernheim, B. Redianu, Y. Leitner and S. Harel

Background: Epidemiological studies have found that intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is closely related to hypertension and is associated with a reduced number of nephrons that may be a predisposing factor for the development of hypertension.

Objectives: To determine whether blood pressure levels of children with a history of IUGR are higher than those of children without IUGR.

Methods: Diastolic, systolic and mean arterial blood pressure levels were measured in 64 children aged 8–12 years old with a history of IUGR (mean birth weight 1780
± 422 g) and compared with 64 age and gender-matched controls who had a normal birth weight (mean 3134 ±  594 g).

Results: Contrary to previous reports, systolic blood pressure values were significantly lower in the IUGR group compared to the controls (91.6
±11.3 vs. 96.6 ±13.9, P = 0.027). There was no difference in diastolic blood pressure values. In the IUGR group, systolic blood pressure correlated significantly with current weight (P < 0.01) and body mass index (P < 0.05), and diastolic blood pressure with weight gain between age 2 and 4 years (P < 0.05). None of the blood pressure values correlated with birth weight.

Conclusions: Children born with IUGR have lower systolic blood pressure levels than matched controls at age 8–12 years. These data indicate that postnatal weight gain in this group has a greater impact on systolic blood pressure than birth weight.
 

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