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עמוד בית
Fri, 19.07.24

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May 2023
Alon Bnaya MD, Gabriel S. Breuer MD, Eliel Ben-David MD, Linda Shavit MD

The patient, a 32-year-old woman diagnosed with Sjögren's syndrome (SS), according to the 2016 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR)/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, presented with paresthesia of her face and limbs. Extra glandular manifestations of her primary disease included severe Raynaud's phenomenon and chronic interstitial nephritis. There was no family history of neurologic diseases. Neurological examination was notable for symmetrical decreased sensation in the upper limbs distally. The rest of the neurological examination was unremarkable.

October 2015
Idit Yedidya MD, Elad Goldberg MD, Ram Sharoni MD, Alex Sagie MD and Mordehay Vaturi MD
July 2007
S.Atar, K.Tolstrup, B.Cercek, and R.J. Siegel.

Background: Chlamydia pneumoniae has previously been associated with higher prevalence of valvular and cardiac calcifications.

Objectives: To investigate a possible association of seropositivity for C. pneumoniae and the presence of cardiac calcifications (mitral annular or aortic root calcification, and aortic valve sclerosis).

Methods: We retrospectively analyzed serological data (immunoglobulin G TWAR antibodies) from the AZACS trial (Azithromycin in Acute Coronary Syndromes), and correlated the serological findings according to titer levels with the presence of cardiac calcifications as detected by transthoracic echocardiography.

Results: In 271 patients, age 69 ± 13 years, who underwent both serological and echocardiographic evaluation, we found no significant association between the "calcification sum score" (on a scale of 0–3) in seropositive compared to seronegative patients (1.56 ± 1.15 vs.1.35 ± 1.15, respectively, P = 0.26). The median "calcification sum score" was 1 (interquartile range 0–3) for the seronegative group, and 2 (interquartile range 0–3) for the seropositive group (P = 0.2757). In addition, we did not find a significant correlation of any of the individual sites of cardiac calcification and Chlamydia pneumoniae seropositivity.

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that past C. pneumoniae infection may not be associated with the pathogenesis of valvular and cardiac calcifications.
 

April 2007
A. Eisen, A. Tenenbaum, N. Koren-Morag, D. Tanne, J. Shemesh, A. Golan, E. Z. Fisman, M. Motro, E. Schwammenthal and Y. Adler

Background: Coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in adults, and cerebrovascular disease is associated with the presence of symptomatic and asymptomatic CHD[1]. Several studies noted an association between coronary calcification and thoracic aorta calcification by several imaging techniques, but this association has not yet been examined in stable angina pectoris patients with the use of spiral computed tomography.

Objectives: To examine by spiral CT the association between the presence and severity of CC[2] and thoracic aorta calcification in patients with stable angina pectoris.

Methods: The patients were enrolled in ACTION (A Coronary Disease Trial Investigating Outcome with Nifedipine GITS) in Israel. The 432 patients (371 men and 61 women aged 40–89 years) underwent chest CT and were evaluated for CC and aortic calcification.

Results: CC was documented in 90% of the patients (n=392) and aortic calcification in 70% (n=303). A significant association (P < 0.05) was found between severity of CC and severity of aortic calcification (as measured by area, volume and slices of calcification). We also found an association between the number of coronary vessels calcified and the presence of aortic calcification: 90% of patients with triple-vessel disease (n=157) were also positive for aortic calcification (P < 0.05). Age also had an effect: 87% of patients ≥ 65 years (n=219) were positive for both coronary and aortic calcification (P = 0.005) while only 57% ≤ 65 (n=209) were positive for both (P = 0.081).

Conclusions: Our study demonstrates a strong association between the presence and severity of CC and the presence and severity of calcification of thoracic aorta in patients with stable angina pectoris as detected by spiral CT.

 






[1] CHD = coronary heart disease



[2] CC = coronary calcification


July 2006
Y. Turgeman, P. Levahar, I. Lavi, A. Shneor, R. Colodner, Z. Samra, L. Bloch and T. Rosenfeld
 Background: Adult calcific aortic stenosis is a well-known clinical entity but its pathophysiology and cellular mechanism have yet to be defined.

Objectives: To determine whether there is an association between the presence and severity of adult calcific aortic stenosis and Chlamydia pneumoniae seropositivity

Methods: Forty adult patients (23 women, 17 men) were divided into three groups according to echocardiographic aortic valve area: Group A – 7 symptomatic subjects (age 67 ± 7 years) with normal aortic valve and normal coronary angiogram, Group B – 16 patients (age 73 ± 6) with moderate ACAS[1] (AVA[2]> 0.8 £ 1.5 cm2), and Group C – 17 patients (age 76 ± 7) with severe ACAS (AVA £ 0.8 cm2). We tested for immunoglobulins M, G and A as retrospective evidence of C. pneumoniae infection using the micro-immunofluorescence method. Past C. pneumoniae infection was defined by IgG titer > 16 £ 512.

Results: No patients in Group A showed positive Ig[3] for C. pneumoniae. IgM was not detected in any of the patients with ACAS (groups B and C) while 2 of 17 patients (12%) in group C showed IgA for the pathogen. High titers of IgG were found in 14 of 33 (42%) of the patients with moderate or severe ACAS: 5 of 16 (31%) in group B and 9 of 17 (53%) in group C (P = 0.2). Both groups had the same prevalence of coronary artery disease (66%). AVA was lower in IgG-seropositive patients than in the seronegative group (0.88 ± 0.3 cm2 vs. 1.22 ± 0.4 cm2, respectively, P = 0.02).

Conclusions: Past C. pneumoniae infection may be associated with a higher prevalence and greater severity of ACAS.


 





[1] ACAS = adult calcific aortic stenosis

[2] AVA = aortic valve area

[3] Ig = immunoglobulin


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