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עמוד בית
Fri, 31.05.24

Search results


December 2023
Roy Bitan MD, Michal Youngster MD, Ana Umanski MD, Sarita Kaufman MD, Alon Kedem MD, Sarit Avraham MD, Gil Yerushalmi MD, Ariel Hourvitz MD, Itai Gat MD

Background: Sperm banks initially focused on providing sperm donation (SD) to heterosexual couples grappling with severe male infertility. Notable advancements in fertility treatments and sociological trends have broadened the scope of SD toward single women and same sex female couples.

Objectives: To evaluate SD recipient characteristics over the last three decades in Israel according to demographic parameters.

Methods: This retrospective cohort study included 5489 women who received SD between January 1992 and December 2021 from a tertiary referral center. We divided the overall period into six groups of five years each. A comparison of demographic characteristics of women who received SD in different periods was performed according to age at the beginning of the treatment, marital status (single women and same sex female couples, heterosexual couples), and ethnic origin.

Results: The average age of women who received SD was 37.02 ± 5.36 years. The average patient age rose from 35.08 years in 1992–1997 to 37.43 years in 2017–2021 (P-value < 0.01). The use of SD was more common among single women and same sex female couples compared to heterosexual couples in later years. Regarding single and same sex female couple, the percentage of SD recipients increased radically from 33% to 88.1% (P-value < 0.01).

Conclusions: Modern sperm banks treat older patients in non-heterosexual relationships. These trends encompass not only medical implications (e.g., in vitro fertilization vs. intrauterine insemination) but also delve into the personal and sociological impact experienced by both patients and offspring.

August 2022
Daphna Landau Prat MD, Shira Sandbank MD, Tal Davidy MD, Ofira Zloto MD, and Guy J. Ben Simon MD

Background: Upper eyelid blepharoplasty surgery is one of the most common plastic surgeries. Khat is used topically to reduce tissue edema.

Objectives: To evaluate the effect of topical khat administration after eyelid surgery on postoperative healing.

Methods: Our prospective comparative study included 24 patients who underwent upper eyelid blepharoplasty or ptosis surgery between 2019 and 2020. Patients were randomly assigned to 48 hours of cold dressing with frozen khat leaves and frozen peas dressing (common practice). Postoperative photographs of the eyes were evaluated for the degree of ecchymosis and edema on postoperative days (PODs) 1, 3, and 7 by three blinded observers. Measures included tissue swelling and hemorrhage on PODs 1, 3, and 7.

Results: The mean age of the cohort was 67 ± 7 years; 17 females (71%). Khat application was associated with lower postoperative ecchymosis at each time point. Females had lower levels of postoperative ecchymosis on POD 7 (P = 0.07). Eyelid edema was more pronounced in the khat group on PODs 1 and 3, but this was reversed on POD 7. There was good agreement among all three observers in grading ecchymosis and edema (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: The use of khat was associated with less tissue ecchymosis after oculoplastic surgery, although this was not statistically significant even following sub-population analysis. The outcome can be attributed to the active ingredients of cathinone and cathine, which cause vasoconstriction and lipolysis, and to the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative flavonoids and phenolic compounds. These encouraging preliminary findings warrant additional studies on a biochemical/cellular level.

January 2021
Mathilda Mandel MD, Michael Gurevich PhD, Michal Mandelboim PhD, Howard Amital MD, and Anat Achiron MD PhD

Background: During the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic outbreak our blood bank developed protocols to guarantee accurate blood components to COVID-19 patients.

Objectives: To provide convalescent whole blood donor screening strategies for patients recovering from COVID-19.

Methods: We recruited COVID-19 recovering patients who met our defined inclusion criteria for whole blood donation. All blood units were screened for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) RNA by real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and SARS-COV-2 immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the S1 domain.

Results: We screened 180 blood units from patients recovering from COVID-19. All results were negative for SARS-CoV-2 RNA and 87.2% were positive for SARS-COV-2 IgG antibodies in the plasma.

Conclusions: Blood component units from recovering COVID-19 patients are safe. Plasma units with positive IgG antibodies could serve as an efficient passive immunization for COVID-19 patients. Moreover, in the face of increased transfusion demand for treatment of anemia and coagulation dysfunction in critical ill COVID-19 patients, red blood cells units and random platelets units from convalescent donors can be safely transfused.

March 2018
Ravit Bassal PhD, Yoav Guilburd MD, Hagit Shapira PhD, Joseph Azuri MD, Judith Zandbank PhD and Eduardo Schejter MD

Background: The human papillomavirus (HPV) test has proven to be efficient in triaging women with abnormal Pap findings in women with low cytological atypia, but there is no data about the accuracy for large loop excision of transformation zone in cases of recurrent atypia.

Objectives: To assess the clinical correlation between results of HPV typing and conization histology in women who had recurrent abnormal Pap test results with no colposcopy findings.

Methods: Our retrospective cohort study included 138 women enrolled in the Maccabi Healthcare Services who had consecutive atypical Pap test results for 2 years in which no abnormal colposcopic findings were detected. These women had an HPV typing and then conization.

Results: Among the total study population (n=138), 71.7% had negative histology, 19.6% had ≤ cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (≤ CIN1), and 8.7% had CIN2+. With regard to HPV typing, 34.8% were negative and 65.2% were positive. Of those testing positive, 34.4% were positive for HPV 16 or 18. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive values of HPV typing for women were 89.7%, 44.4%, 38.9%, and 91.7%, respectively, and for HPV 16 or 18: 71.4%, 67.7%, 32.3%, and 100.0%, respectively. After stratification by cytological grades, for women with high-grade cervical cytology, the sensitivity and negative predictive values of the HPV typing were higher than among low-grade cervical cytology, while specificity and positive predictive values were lower.

Conclusions: HPV typing is a useful tool for the management of patients with persistently abnormal Pap test results.

November 2017
Ron Lavy MD, Yehuda Hershkovitz MD, Ayyad Muhamad MD, Judith Sandbank MD and Ariel Halevy MD

Background: In colon cancer, data regarding proximal and distal metastasis to lymph nodes remains scarce.

Objectives: To evaluate lymph node distribution along the longitudinal axis of the colon as related to a tumor to re-examine the common practice of 5 cm proximal and 2 cm distal resection margins.

Methods: We studied 106 patients (53 males and 53 females, mean age 67.9 ± 10 years) who had undergone left hemicolectomy or sigmoidectomy. Colonic cancer specimens were divided into five zones proximally and distally to the tumor. For each zone, overall lymph node evaluation and ratio was performed.

Results: The mean number of retrieved lymph nodes per patient was 24.3 ± 12, with 54.9% of the nodes concentrated in zone I, 22.1% in zone II, 9.5% in zone III, 10.3% in zone IV, and 3% in zone V. While most positive nodes were found in zone I, significant numbers were also detected in both directions proximally and distally to the tumor.

Conclusions: It seems that longer colonic segments proximally, and especially distally, should be considered for resection to significantly reduce the chances of finding involved lymph node.

October 2016
December 2015
Ron Lavy MD, Yehuda Hershkovitz MD, Bar Chikman MD, Zahar Shapira MD, Natan Poluksht MD, Nirit Yarom MD, Judth Sandbank MD and Ariel Halevy MD
 

Background: Despite the ongoing decrease in the incidence of gastric cancer, this disease is still a major cause of death. It is still debatable whether D2 lymphadenectomy improves survival and whether this procedure should be performed routinely or selectively.


Objectives: To compare the pathological and short-term results following radical D2-type gastric resection and lymphadenectomy versus the more limited D1 type resection and lymphadenectomy.


Methods: We conducted a retrospective study on 4 years experience treating 164 patients suffering from gastric cancer. We compared the results between the group of patients who underwent a radical D2 type gastric resection and lymphadenectomy (n=100) and those of a relatively small group of patients who intentionally underwent the more limited D1 type (n=34). 


Results: The overall number of harvested lymph nodes was 9 ± 4 in the D1 group compared to 30 ± 12 (range 16–69) in the D2 group (P = 0.001). Of the 100 patients undergoing a D2 lymphadenectomy, 57% had positive nodes compared to 38% of the 34 patients in the D1 group (P = 0.045).


Conclusions: We showed statistically significant differences between D1 and D2 procedures in the overall number of harvested lymph nodes and the proportion of positive nodes to the overall number. Our results support the fact that D2 resection should be recommended as the standard approach of treatment for gastric cancer patients, ensuring a larger number of retrieved lymph nodes and a comparable rate of complications and mortality. 


 
November 2015
Asnat Raziel MD, Nasser Sakran MD, Amir Szold MD, Judith Sandbank MD, Dan Hershko MD and David Goitein MD

Background: Gallbladder (GB) cancer is rare. Most cases are incidentally found in specimens after a cholecystectomy. Cholelithiasis is almost always present when this diagnosis is made. Obesity is a known risk factor for gallstone formation and thus may be related to GB cancer. 

Objectives: To highlight the importance of evaluation of the gallbladder before surgery, resection of the gallbladder whenever required, and screening the resected tissue for malignancy.

Methods: We retrospectively queried a prospectively maintained database of all bariatric procedures during the last 8 years for cases of concomitant laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Pathologic reports of the gallbladders were reviewed. Demographic data and perioperative parameters were documented. 

Results: Of 2708 patients reviewed, 1721 (63.55%) were females and 987 (36.45%) males. Excluded were 145 (5.35%) who had a previous cholecystectomy. Of the remaining 2563, 180 (7.02%) had symptomatic gallbladder disease and underwent LSG with LC. Of these, two females (BMI 53 kg/m² and BMI 47 kg/m², both age 60) were found by histological examination to have adenocarcinoma in their GB specimens (1.11%). Both were reoperated, which included partial hepatectomy of the GB bed, resection of the cystic stump, lymph node dissection, and resection of the port sites. One patient is doing well, with no evidence of disease at a postoperative follow-up of 4 years. The second patient had recurrent disease with peritoneal spread and ascites 20 months post-surgery and died 18 months later. 

Conclusions: GB cancer is a rare finding in cholecystectomy specimens. The incidence of this entity might be higher in obese older females owing to the higher incidence of cholelithiasis in these patients. 

 

January 2015
Yehiel Ziv MD, Avinoam Nevler MD, Ehud Willenz DVM, Ofer Doron, Andrew Zbar MD, Aino Shperber MD and Judith Sandbank MD

Background: New animal models provide insights into the pathogenesis of different types of inflammatory bowel disease as well as novel pathways for new therapeutic options. However, the scarcity of large animal models hinders the research and development of new surgical procedures and technological devices in inflammatory bowel disease surgery. Common small animal inducible models involve chemical agents that result in the development of acute intestinal inflammation.

Objectives: To assess a novel method for the induction of Crohn’s-like colitis using intramural injection of sclerosants in a porcine model.

Methods: Seven domestic pigs underwent several experimental protocols to assess the efficacy of intramural colonic injections of two different compounds (lauromacrogol, and phenol in almond oil). Twenty-five different large bowel segments were treated with intramural injections of the compounds. The animals were followed for 6 weeks, and treated colonic segments were resected for histopathological examination.

Results: Intramural injection of lauromacrogol resulted in non-specific, mild reactive foreign body changes only. Injection of various dosages of 5% phenol in almond oil caused a range of histopathological changes varying from focal fibrosis to Crohn’s-like reactions comprising acute and chronic infiltrates, mucosal ulceration and focal necrosis with enteric and lymphoid non-caseating granulomas.

Conclusions: Intramural colonic phenol in almond oil injection in pigs induces inflammatory reactions that histologically resemble Crohn's disease in humans. 

March 2014
Hasan Kais MD, Yehuda Hershkovitz MD, Judith Sandbank MD and Ariel Halevy
July 2013
A. Shalom, M. Westreich and S. Sandbank
 Background: Loss of an excised lesion can have devastating clinical and legal consequences. Previously, the incidence of pathological specimen loss was 1/1466 (0.07%) due to failure to place pathology specimens in correctly labeled containers. We theorized that a strict protocol for handling specimens would help reduce losses.

Objectives: To devise a protocol to reduce the loss of pathology specimens.

Methods: In this study, 7105 specimens excised by one plastic surgeon were sent to the pathology laboratory using a strict protocol, which included: using a carefully labeled specimen container, inserting the specimen into the container immediately after excision (not at the end of the procedure), positioning the specimen container close to the surgical field during the surgery, and both the nurse and surgeon signing their names on the container at the end of the procedure to confirm the contents and labeling.

Results: One Mohs specimen was accidentally thrown away by a pathology laboratory technician after the frozen section report was written (an incidence of 1/7105, 0.00014%). All specimens arrived in the pathology department and no lesions were lost in the operating room.

Conclusions: A strict written protocol for specimen handling significantly reduces loss of pathology specimens.

March 2012
A Kapiev, R. Lavy, J. Sandbank and A. Halevy
September 2011
I. Rabin, A. Kapiev, B. Chikman, Z. Halpern, N. Poluksht, I. Wassermann, J. Sandbank and A. Halevy

Background: Gastric stump cancer is often described as a tumor with a poor prognosis and low resectability rates.

Objectives: To compare the pathological characteristics of gastric stump cancer patients with those of patients with proximal gastric cancer.

Methods: This retrospective study was based on the demographic and pathological data of patients diagnosed with gastric cancer and treated at Assaf Harofeh Medical Center during an 11 year period. The patients were divided into two groups: those undergoing proximal gastrectomy for proximal gastric cancer and those undergoing total gastrectomy for gastric stump cancer.

Results: Patients with gastric stump cancer were predominantly male, older (P = 0.202, not significant), and had a lower T stage with less signet-ring type histology, fewer harvested and fewer involved lymph nodes (P = 0.03, statistically significant) and less vascular/lymphatic involvement than patients with proximal gastric cancer.

Conclusions: The lower incidence of involved lymph nodes and lymphovascular invasion in gastric stump cancer as compared to proximal gastric cancer in this study may imply that the prognosis of gastric stump cancer may be better than that of proximal gastric cancer. However, to verify this assumption a study comparing patient survival is required.
 

November 2010
B. Chikman, R. Lavy, T. Davidson, I. Wassermann, J. Sandbank, N. Siegelmann-Danieli and A. Halevy

Background: Infiltrating ductal carcinoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma account for more than 90% of all invasive breast cancer histological types. The rate of ILC[1] is reported to be increasing steadily in the United States and Europe.

Objectives: To describe the trend in the incidence of ILC in a large cohort of patients who underwent surgery in a single institution over an 18 year period.

Methods: Our comprehensive database of 2175 consecutive patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed during the period 1992–2009 served for the analysis. Several potential factors associated with lobular carcinoma as compared with ductal carcinoma were evaluated.

Results: During this period, a 2.4-fold increase in the incidence of pure ILC was noted, from 4.6% in the years 1992–1994 to 10.9% in 2004–2006, followed by a modest decrease to 8.7% in 2007–2009. A significant association of lobular malignancies with external hormonal use was noted, including hormone replacement therapy exposure in patients diagnosed at age 50–64, and ovarian overstimulation during in vitro fertilization in those diagnosed at age 50 or less.  

Conclusions: Better diagnostic tools – such as the liberal use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging – and more accurate pathological definition for ILC type appear to influence the changes in the incidence of ILC in the subgroups of invasive breast cancer.






[1] ILC = infiltrating lobular carcinoma


February 2009
I. Rabin, B. Chikman, R. Lavy, J. Sandbank, M. Maklakovsky, R. Gold-Deutch, Z. Halpren, I. Wassermann and A. Halevy

Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the human gastrointestinal tract.

Objectives: To review our accumulated experience using surgery to treat gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

Methods: We reviewed all patient charts and histological diagnoses of leiomyomas, leiomyosarcomas, leiomyoblastomas and schwannomas. Only tumors that displayed c-kit (CD117) immunopositivity were defined as GISTs[1].

Results: The study group comprised 40 female and 53 male patients (age 26–89 years); 40.9% of the tumors were classified as malignant, 39.8% as benign, and 19.4% as of uncertain malignancy. Fifty-six GISTs were located in the stomach (60.2%), 29 in the small bowel (31.2%), 4 in the duodenum (4.3%), 2 in the colon (2.1%) and 2 in the rectum (2.1%). Incidental GISTs were found in 23.7% of our patients. Mean overall survival time for malignant gastric GISTs was 102.6 months (95% confidence interval 74.2–131.1) as compared to 61.4 months mean overall survival for malignant small bowel GISTs (95% CI[2] 35.7–87) (P = 0.262). The mean disease-free survival period for patients with malignant gastric GISTs was 97.5 months (95% CI 69.7–125.2) as compared to only 49.6 months (95% CI 27.4–71.7) for patients with small bowel malignant GISTs (P = 0.041).

Conclusions: We found a high percentage of incidental GISTs. Gastric GISTs are more common than small bowel GISTs. Patients with malignant gastric GISTs have a significantly better prognosis than patients with malignant small bowel GISTs. A statistically significant correlation was found between age and malignant potential of the GIST.






[1] GISTs = gastrointestinal stromal tumors

[2] CI = confidence interval



 
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