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עמוד בית
Sat, 20.07.24

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December 2020
Rachel Shemesh BSc, Guy J. Ben Simon MD, Lev Bedrin MD, and Arkadi Yakirevitch MD
November 2019
Ruth Yousovich MD, Shay I. Duvdevani MD, Noga Lipschitz MD, Michael Wolf MD, Lela Migirov MD, and Arkadi Yakirevitch MD

Background: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of vertigo. It is assumed that sleep is involved in the pathogenesis of BPPV, and that habitual head-lying side during sleep correlates with the affected side in the posterior semicircular canal BPPV.

Objectives: To investigate the relationship between the preferred sleeping position and the affected semicircular canal in patients with BPPV.

Methods: We performed a retrospective data review of patients seeking help for vertigo/dizziness who had undergone clinical evaluation including a Dix–Hallpike test. Patients diagnosed with posterior canal BPPV (p-BPPV) were asked to define their preferred lying side (right, left, supine, or variable) during the night sleep. Affected semicircular canal (right posterior or left posterior) was registered along with demographic data.

Results: In all, 237 patients were diagnosed with p-BPPV. Patients with horizontal semicircular canal BPPV (n=11) were excluded. Patient mean age was 57 years (range 14–87). There were 150 patients with right p-BPPV and 87 patients with left p-BPPV. Among the patients, 122 (52%) habitually slept on the right side. Of those, 102 (84%) were diagnosed with right p-BPPV (P = 0.0006), while 82 patients (34%) habitually slept on the left side. Fifty-three (65%) were diagnosed with left p-BPPV (P < 0.0001). There were no differences in right vs. left p-BPPV in the 33 patients (14%) who expressed no preference concerning their sleeping positions.

Conclusions: Our study highlights the etiology of BPPV and showed that changing sleep position habits might be helpful in preventing recurrent BPPV.

June 2013
A. Yakirevitch, G. Nakache, N. Lipschitz, E.E. Alon, M. Wolf and Y.P. Talmi
 Background: Tracheostomy is a frequent, and at times semiurgent, surgical procedure. It is performed in close proximity to the thyroid gland, and in many cases requires division of its isthmus putting a patient in danger of significant bleeding.

Objectives: To examine prospectively the feasibility of vessel sealing in tracheostomy.

Methods: A vessel-sealing device was used in 24 consecutive patients undergoing tracheostomy. There were no exclusion criteria for enrolling the patients. No other hemostatic technique was used for dividing the isthmus.

Results: There were no bleeding events throughout the postoperative period. The operating time savingwas 5–10 minutes.

Conclusions: Use of the vessel sealer was found to be straightforward, efficacious, rapid and safe. 

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